Posts Tagged ‘Thoughts’

C-PTSD environmentally, not genetically, caused.

Pixabay: johnhain

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Complex PTSD: From Surviving to Thriving

“First, the good news about Cptsd. It is a learned set of responses, and a failure to complete numerous important developmental tasks.

This means that it is environmentally, not genetically, caused. In other words, unlike most of the diagnoses it is confused with, it is neither inborn nor characterological.

As such, it is learned. It is not inscribed in your DNA.

It is a disorder caused by nurture [or rather the lack of it] not nature.

This is especially good news because what is learned can be unlearned and vice versa.

What was not provided by your parents can now be provided by yourself and others.

Recovery from Cptsd typically has important self-help and relational components.

The relational piece can come from authors, friends, partners, teachers, therapists, therapeutic groups or any combination of these.

I like to call this reparenting by committee.”

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Aware Presence part one, 1,

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From “The Art of Peace and Happiness”

For a mind that has become accustomed for so many years to knowing only objects–that is, to focusing its attention and interests on the body, mind and world alone–it is inevitable that the desire to know oneself as some kind of a subtle object will persist.

We will search for this aware Presence and try to make it an object of our knowledge or experience.

However, if we return again and again to the experiential understanding that our self is the knower or witness of all objects, it becomes clear that it cannot itself be an object.

It is our simple experience that our self is present and aware but has no objective qualities.

As this experiential understanding deepens, so the attempt to search for our self as an object decreases correspondingly.

But the inability to know our self as an object does not mean that our self cannot be known.

It simply means that it cannot be known in the way that an object is usually known, that is, through the subject–object relationship.

Our true self is known in a more intimate and direct way, simply through being.

In fact, we discover that the only way to know our self is to be our self and not to mistake our self for any kind of an object.

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My two cents: The author details that this “Aware Presence” is not contained in the mind or body.

It is the observer of the mind and body.

It is not limited by the mind or body.

It has unlimited ability. 😎

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A follower answers “Why is it so hard to take action”

Pixabay: johnhain

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I am reflecting. For me I think part of it is being beat down to low or no self esteem. You get so convinced you cannot do anything right that you just quit trying. Why try one more thing so you can fail again? Just hide in the hole that has been dug for you to live in instead of taking the chance of crawling out by the fingernails one more time.

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Thank you for your input. PTSD is epidemic, how to heal is complex and not easily found or understood.

Without proper tools and direction, PTSD can be a formidable opponent. I tried to think my way out and ended up agoraphobic.

Can you tolerate trying one more time with some key wisdom and mindfulness skills?

PTSD will get worse as we heal. Healing was violent internally, highly emotional and anxious as my abuse integrated and let go.

Meditation is a roto rooter, it will dig up unworthiness, anxiety and trauma.

Meditation plots a course directly at the center of our trauma. We are on a collision course, the path less travelled.

I guess my blog and mindfulness group is about hope.

Giving hope to those who think getting better is impossible.

I failed over and over, tried one therapy after another, holistic healers, acupuncture, massage and out of the box cures. Nothing helped, I got worse.

My fathers abuse built a strong sense of determination, I was lucky.

We all have inner strengths and boundless worth inside us.

I would encourage everyone to start meditating, applying mindfulness daily.

Healing is incremental, a little each day.

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A world class Meditator faces capture and torture

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Matthew Ricard from the book “Happiness”

After the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1959, Tenzin Choedrak, the personal physician of the Dalai Lama, was first sent to a forced labor camp in northeastern Tibet along with some one hundred others.

Five prisoners, himself among them, survived.

He was transferred from camp to camp for nearly twenty years and often thought that he would die of hunger or of the abuse inflicted on him.

A psychiatrist who specializes in post-traumatic stress and who treated Doctor Choedrak was astonished that he showed not the least sign of post-traumatic stress syndrome.

He was not bitter, felt no resentment, displayed serene kindness, and had none of the usual psychological problems, such as anxiety, nightmares, and so on.

Choedrak acknowledged that he occasionally felt hatred for his torturers, but that he always returned to the practice of meditation on inner peace and compassion.

That was what sustained his desire to go on living and ultimately saved him.

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My two cents: This meditator did not get PTSD, did not become hyper vigilant, or contemplate suicide.

We do not know what thoughts (demons) any man faces but these world class meditators live life fully.

Suicide is extremely rare or non existent for these world class meditators.

In my mind, a focused meditator will not commit suicide unless there is a severe disorder or a traumatic brain injury.

“He occasionally felt hatred for his torturers, but that he always returned to the practice of meditation on inner peace and compassion.”

We let those hateful, harmful, suicide thoughts pass on through.

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Suicide prevention month finds two prominent depression and suicide prevention leaders committing suicide!

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Jarrid Wilson, a Southern California megachurch pastor and mental health advocate, died by suicide Monday.

“Wilson, 30, was associate pastor at Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverside, under Pastor Greg Laurie. He co-founded Anthem of Hope, a mental health nonprofit helping people dealing with depression and suicidal thoughts. He is survived by his wife, Julianne, and two sons, Finch and Denham.”

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“The executive director of counseling and psychological services at the University of Pennsylvania died by suicide Monday morning in Philadelphia, officials said.

Gregory Eells became the head of the department at UPENN in March.”

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My two cents: WOW! I am perplexed on many levels, extreme sadness is one emotion.

How does religion handle a suicide like this? Usually your condemned, a mortal sin in the Catholic Church. This pastor lived an exemplary life of giving and service.

On a personal level, they had a role similar to mine. The pastor mentored others with depression and mental illness, like this blog and my mindfulness group.

This is conflicting for me, I have compassion for their struggles but my father would win if I committed suicide.

All those that follow me or have been helped by me would be impacted negatively.

If you are the leader and committ suicide, have you considered those your leaving behind?

In the confusing throws of negative thought and unhealthy emotions reality slips away.

One thought dominates after a while, we never know what another is experiencing or thinking.

I have been touched by suicide in my mindfulness group. It is devastating for the survivors.

I wonder if one of the Dalai Lamas has ever committed suicide?

Next post will be on Dalai Lamas physician who was captured by the Chinese and tortured. An Amazing story.

Please share your thoughts.

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the Thinker has patterns

Pixabay: makeitclear

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The Buddhists call it non-dualism, the “Ego” is created, like a ventriloquists dummy.

In today’s vernacular our Facebook page carries only the things we want others to see. It is the persona we present as I, me, mine.

That persona wants to keep up appearances to the outside world.

Our feelings and emotions become connected with performance and behavior that gets approval.

We can get lost chasing this lochness monster.

Can you tolerate looking below the surface, observing how the “Ego” feels and makes decisions.

Ever wonder why all that effort never brings the satisfaction you desire?

Can you tolerate not being important?

Can you tolerate not controlling, or being right or most powerful?

Can you just be in the present moment without a construct (”Ego”).

Do we need to compete with other “Egos” or can we exist in harmony, sharing this journey.

What are your patterns?

What will you do for approval?

Does that satisfaction last or quench your desire?

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Sheila Catherine: subtle motivations behind your speech today

 

Pixabay: vinsky200

 

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Notice the subtle motivations behind your speech today. When is the primary communication merely your own existence?


Sometimes what is said is not very important; what we are really saying is, “notice me, I’m here, I’m special, I am like this, I am.”


It can be useful to grow sensitive to the tendency to seek respect, appreciation, confirmation, praise, or recognition.


You don’t need to squelch these desires should they arise, but notice how they contribute to the development of self-formations.


Are you in a phase in your life when self-formations are valuable, or are you ready to deconstruct these processes?


You can also observe your internal dialog, ruminations, and daydreams.


“Make a note of moments when the thought “I am” forms. How much of your thinking is recreating and reinforcing the story of being you?


What would the experience of your life be like without the burden of incessant becoming?”
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