Posts Tagged ‘Thoughts’

Trauma Victims

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“Trauma victims cannot recover until they become familiar with and befriend the sensations in their bodies. . . . 

Physical self-awareness is the first step in releasing the tyranny of the past.”

 —Bessel van der Kolk

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 My two cents:  Start with becoming friends with the nervous system.

 

 

Use the breath to activate our parasympathetic nervous system (the brakes)

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Part two: 3 Ways Highly Successful People Handle Self-Doubt By Melody Wilding, LMSW

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How Highly Successful Deal with Impostor Syndrome

 

1. They recognize repetitive thought patterns and actively change their mindset

 

Out of the 60,000 to 70,000 thoughts we have every day, estimates suggest 98% of them are the same. This means your inner-critic is really a habit– a thought pattern you can get control of.

 

Start by identifying underlying beliefs (potentially rooted in childhood) that may make you feel as though you don’t deserve your success. Look for exaggerated, irrational, or unrealistic thoughts that come up again and again, and practice identifying common cognitive distortions that trip you up.

 

2. They get curious and ask questions

 

Your inner-critic is really there to protect you, so do your best to practice self-compassion. Take the questions it poses at face value and use them for problem solving.

 

For example, if your inner-critic is cautioning that you may not be ready to pursue a new career path, address its concerns constructively. Use it as an opportunity to honestly assess your skills and evaluate gaps you need to fill.

 

3. They don’t let fear get in the way of their purpose

 

We all experience worry and confusion in the face of change and uncertainty. It’s normal to be afraid. Our inner-critic will always speak up anytime we try to do big things no matter how positive we try to be. Hearing the voice of your inner-critic can mean you’re about to do something brave and important to you. No one gets the luxury of living without fear–not even confident people.

 

So, it’s time to start viewing your emotions — the good and the bad — for what they are: your greatest strength and most valuable tool.
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What is the smallest, easiest, quickest way to start healing, improving, living fully

 

 

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ONE BREATH!

 

ONE BREATH!

 

You can not exert any less energy than following one breath with specific, intense focus.

 

It takes 10 seconds to a max of 20 seconds.

 

 

This post is an attempt to reach the 95 out of 100 PTSD sufferers who have not taken that first step!

 

 

PTSD is epidemic, our military can not slow down the 20 suicides a day.

 

 

There exists a healing path for the vast majority of PTSD sufferers.

 

 

If you are suffering from Depression, anxiety, PTSD or another disorder, please explore why even 20 seconds of trying remains elusive.

 

 

This is an invitation, a plea to take this small action, or an action of your choosing.

 

 

Deciding not to try, to not change, is as momentous a decision as changing drastically.

 

 

What has to happen before you take action?

 

 

 

Avoiding this question could cost you everything!

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“Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors”: How Understanding the Brain Can Help By Dawn McClelland, PHD, and Chris Gilyard, MA

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Excerpt:
UNDERSTANDING THE BRAIN AND BODY IN TRAUMA

“Several parts of the brain are important in understanding how the brain and body function during trauma. They include the forebrain (the prefrontal cortex); the limbic system, which is located in the center of the brain; and the brain stem.

 

When a person experiences a traumatic event, adrenalin rushes through the body and the memory is imprinted into the amygdala, which is part of the limbic system. The amygdala holds the emotional significance of the event (the intensity and impulse of emotion). For example, if you’re on a roller coaster, your sensory information is “fear, speed, stress, excitement, not life threatening.” The amygdala can read the emotional significance of the event: “it’s a ride, it’s fun, you are done in 3 minutes.” The amygdala stores the visual images of trauma as sensory fragments, which means the trauma memory is not stored like a story, but by how our five senses were experiencing the trauma at the time it was occurring. The memories are stored through fragments of visual images, smells, sounds, tastes, or touch.

 

 

Consequently, after trauma, the brain can easily be triggered by sensory input, reading normal circumstances as dangerous. For example, a red light is no longer a red light, now it’s a possible spark. A barbecue had been just a barbecue, but now it sounds like an explosion. The sensory fragments are misinterpreted and the brain loses its ability to discriminate between what is threatening and what is normal.

 

 

The rational part of our brain is the prefrontal cortex. This is the front part of our brain, where consciousness lives, processing and reasoning occur, and we make meaning of language. When a trauma occurs, people enter into a fight, flight, or freeze state, which can result in the prefrontal cortex shutting down. The brain becomes somewhat disorganized and overwhelmed because of the trauma, while the body goes into a survival mode and shuts down the higher reasoning and language structures of the brain. The result of the metabolic shutdown is a profound imprinted stress response.”

 

 

https://www.phoenix-society.org/resources/entry/calming-trauma-how-understanding-the-brain-can-help
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Lining up our healing practice!

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Let us train the brain, the mind to let go of all the negative, all the judgment, all the resentment, all the anger, all the unworthiness, all the helpless, hopeless thought and emotion.

 

We need to line up our healing, have all of our oars rowing in the right direction, then at the right cadence of our being.

 

First our self image needs affirmations repeated out-loud. This addresses the unworthiness we harbor.

 

Second, we initiate a daily focus practice (Meditation) along with constant application of staying present.

 

Third, Physical exercise, preferably aerobic to exhaustion for flushing the toxins, strengthening the mind and body, and mental and physical accomplishment.

 

Work on observing strong emotions, judgments or comparisons from a distance. Observe means a neutral, a distant look, like watching a rerun of a past eposode of your life.

 

A reun is over, already happened, impossible to change or influence. A complete waste of time and energy. Remember happiness only exists in the present moment, all other pursuit robs us.

 

Relax, smile, challenges are part of life, accept them and exert maximum effort with a positive attitude.

 

Results are not our concern!!!!!!

 

No matter what happens, our goal is to give maximum effort with the most positive attitude we can muster.

 

Then smile and enjoy the journey.
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Meditation: Mind Observing Mind: part two: Matthew Ricard!

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Thoughts arise.
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The mind exists in some way, because you experience it.
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Apart from that, what could be said about it?
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Examine your mind and the thoughts that arise there.
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Can any concrete characteristics be attributed to them?
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Do they have a location?
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Do they have a color?
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A form?
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The more you look, the less you find.
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You note of course that the mind has a capacity to know, but it has no other intrinsic and real characteristic.
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This is the reason Buddhism defines the mind as a continuum of experiences.
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It does not constitute a distinct entity; it is “empty of inherent existence.”
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Having found nothing in any way substantial, remain for a few moments in this state of not having found anything.
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When a thought appears, just let it arise and pass away by itself, without either blocking or prolonging it.
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During the brief time that your mind is not burdened by any discursive thought, contemplate its nature.
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In this gap, after past thoughts have ceased and future thoughts have not yet appeared, do you perceive a consciousness that is pure and luminous?
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Remain a few moments in this state of natural simplicity, free from concepts.
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Mindfulness Practice: “Living with the Heart Wide open”

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Mindful Self-Inquiry
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We can learn to be suspicious of particular thoughts, such as most judgmental and repetitive thoughts and any self-hating thoughts.
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There’s wisdom in suspecting that something is amiss in this kind of thinking.
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It can lead to investigations and discoveries about how you color your world and how you make yourself miserable or happy through the filter of your thoughts.
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This type of investigation can help you see what is real and what isn’t, and what thoughts to believe or not.
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When you don’t automatically believe all of your thoughts, they’ll lose their power to shape a faulty sense of self.
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Mindful self-inquiry is a practice that can help you investigate anything, including the pain of old wounds, as well as other unpleasant thoughts and stories that create suffering.
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Because unworthiness is a kind of trance that obstructs clear seeing, self-inquiry can be useful in drawing back the veil and seeing the unconscious reactions that perpetuate the cycle of pain and suffering.
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It involves looking deeply and unflinchingly into your wounded heart in order to see things more objectively—without judgment and without avoidance.
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This work involves tenderness and a friendly kind of curiosity.
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