Posts Tagged ‘Thoughts’

My Thoughts are Endless!

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Thoughts are definitely my issue. I can discount the emotion attached to a thought or at least lessen the impact.

 

Thoughts spring from an unknown well, deep inside the cavern of our mind. We are not responsible for their content or origin.

 

 

Some thoughts shock me. I never would consider behaving in a manner detailed by some of my thoughts. Seems my “Ego” is insulted easily, seeks retribution or even revenge on that offending person. Wishing bad luck on them appears in vivid illustration and joy. Oh my, that is not me is it?

 

 

For me, letting my mind ruminate or wander aimlessly leads to trouble. In our default mode thoughts look into the unworthiness of the “I” we created. That is a target rich environment for me.

 

 

I am the happiest when I am in the moment, observing life, judging little and smiling more.

 

 

When my PTSD is triggered, thoughts arrive at a staggering rate and intensity. Combined with cortisol, adrenaline and the other physiological changes, these thoughts can wield enormous power.

 

 

Thinking becomes irrational when triggers ignite. We believe crazy thoughts easily. Fear and anxiety accelerate our pace of thinking and avoiding.

 


My relief arrives when I focus on my breath, intently, letting go of the thought, choosing to breathe into the body sensations.

 


I watch my thoughts fade when possible.  Very, very empowering to see thoughts fade, emotions melt and the mind find clarity.
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Attachment to things influences our mood, behavior, wellbeing

The Tennis Court Oath of the French Revolution.

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Our moods ebb and tide. Thoughts and emotions impact these changes.

 


The Zen Buddhists point the finger at attachment, identifying with our thoughts and “Ego.”

 

Judging an event, a person, or a situation attaches a ball and chain around our ankle.

 

 

We will defend, argue and sometimes fight to uphold that judgment. This is exhausting and drains vital energy.

 

 

Judgment is “Ego” based, emotionally charged. I, me, mine can be pissed, enraged, jealous, anxious, traumatized or joyful.

 

 

These emotions and moods can change instantly with external stimuli or focused attention.

 

 

Look at this election, people hating for their attachment to one party or the other, belief in a proposition.

 

 

Strong negative emotions remove us from our chance at happiness.

 

 

Hate and happiness are never in the same ballpark, never linked.

 


Where one is present the other is absent.
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Triggers part two,,2,,

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Let’s be realistic about our expectations. Our healing path will have set backs, frustrating results, intense anxiety mixed with fear.

 

Our trauma (PTSD) has access to our fight or flight mechanism. A trigger thought, a sound or smell ignites our fight or flight mechanism. We are preparing for a lethal threat from the past, but none currently exists.

 

PTSD is a mirage, a stored implicit memory of trauma. The physical changes and drugs our body secretes are real.

 

There is no real danger, just our own defense mechanism. Hopefully, this wisdom helps us resist avoiding, ruminating or freezing (shutting down).

 

In my mindfulness group, if someone is triggered, I trace five slow, intense breaths with them. Eyes open, I sit across from them, tracing the breathing track together.

 

I reassure them of their safety, using slow breaths to dissipate the cortisol and adrenaline. They are instructed to let go of the storyline and absorb the cortisol with their slow exhales.

 

It may take five or more breaths. They realize you can impact PTSD fear and anxiety.

 

It surprises them when things calm a bit. The intense fear and anxiety can be influenced.

 

PTSD loses some power each time we focus, let go and breathe deeply.

 

Our fearful thoughts and judgments soften and fade.


Each time we let the storyline go, we inch closer to wellbeing.

 


This is when PTSD is at its strongest, triggering the fight or flight mechanism. We fear triggers so much we avoid people and situations that ignite our trauma.

 


This is also the time when PTSD is at its most vulnerable.

 

If you can entertain the thought that PTSD is a bluff, that no real power or danger is present, healing is possible.

 


If we can stay present, focused, PTSD loses power.

 

 

You will discover no real danger exists inside our defense mechanism.

 

 

With practice we can learn to accept the anxious, scary mechanism as normal.

 

 

My fight or flight mechanism does not fire around my triggers anymore.

 


You can also integrate your trauma and calm your nervous system!

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The Moment Before

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“Well,” said Pooh,

 

“what I like best,”

 

and then he had to stop and think.

 

Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do,

 

there was a moment just before you began to eat it

 
which was better than when you were,

 

 

but he didn’t know what it was called.

 

~A.A. Milne
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My two cents: Even a simple mind can exhibit clarity and awareness of his/her inner world.

 

 

Studies have demonstrated that the most enjoyable part of a vacation can be the planning and anticipation of the trip.

 

 


Satisfaction rarely lives up to our emotional desires.

 

 


Satisfaction never quenches the ever-present desire for more.

 

 

 

Pooh realizes that the anticipation carries the most weight, not the fulfillment.
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Why is change so difficult???????????

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Where does all the resistance come from? Why do we isolate, avoid unpleasant situations and people. Why do we chase and covet pleasant situations, people who approve of us, accomplishment, power, status and security?

 

Seems a decent strategy to avoid pain and soak up accomplishment in the short-term. Counterintuitive, knowing this strategy leads to suffering.

 

We have practiced habits, patterns of behavior, some subconscious in origin. We have created an “Ego” to mirror our habitual patterns. Our identity is wrapped around this “Ego”. Be it a banker, athlete, monk, priest, accountant, home maker, actor, philanthropist, etc.

 

 

Inside this cocoon, we judge ourself, find a place where we believe we fit, belong. When we enter a room, our “Ego” scans the occupants and decides if we are superior or inferior, then ranks our status.

 

 

Yes, this is superficial and kind of crazy. First, the “Ego” is a mirage, we are not what we think or judge. Second those occupations are what we do, not who we are.

 

 

Our mind is the issue, also the solution.

 

 

Fear of the unknown and this “Ego” are the main culprits keeping us from changing. We would rather suffer a known situation than risk changing, even when there is a possibility of success.

 

 

The “Ego” covets complete control. Healing means the “Ego” loses more and more control. In reality the “Ego” does not know what is good or bad for us. The “Ego” only, desires complete control.

 

 

Remember he/she generates 60,000 thoughts daily to influence where we place our attention.

 

 

You will definitely encounter your own “Ego” if you take this healing journey. He/She is not evil, he/she is only a follower not our captain.

 

 

Training the mind to empty and focus takes power from the “Ego”.
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Meditation/Mindfulness: A different type of focus, intensity!!!!!! .

 

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Thoughts are endless, 60,000 daily on average.

 

 

Focus must be intense, not anxious or strained. Thoughts will sneak in.

 

 

Trying to suppress thought, leads to the proliferation of more thought.

 

 

Letting thoughts go is the solution. We must let them fade on their own.

 

 

Without intense focus on the breath, letting go is near impossible.

 

 

Practice focus on five breaths at a time. Rest, then focus on another five breaths.

 


Start your practice with 10 to 20 minutes sessions.

 

Forget judging, focus intently, relax and enjoy.

 

No right or wrong, no good or bad, no words, no past or future where we are headed.

 


This is how we train the brain/mind for wellbeing, gratitude and being happy.
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Ways to focus our mindfulness practice on the body ?

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Our mindfulness practice can be focused on connecting our awareness to our body.

 


This is the path that integrates trauma stored in the body. Our fight or flight mechanism does not need to fire for us to be influenced by residual trauma stored in the body.

 

 

When we feel our bodies triggered, an opportunity presents itself.

 

 

We can dissociate into thought, fueling PTSD or we can observe, feel and breathe into the part that is aroused. One fuels PTSD, the other calms and integrates.

 

 

Trauma stored in the body needs an intense exploration from a friendly unbiased observer.   We sit still, focus and listen to our interior world.

 

 

The first time I healed, my body trauma left me last.

 

 

A mindful practice brings intimate awareness of all these sensations without the storyline.

 

 

When we feel anxious, spooked or fearful, another opportunity arises.

 

 

Once our body trauma is felt without the storyline, it calms a little.

 

 

Repeated acceptance and befriending of our nervous system and body will integrate some of our PTSD.
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