Posts Tagged ‘Thoughts’

Thoughts and emotions, Which comes first?

 

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In my mind, emotions attach to thoughts. Certain thoughts manifest with the same emotion every time they enter our consciousness.

 

Feeling helpless in a dangerous situation, imprints this trauma with these same emotions.


PTSD triggers can activate our fight or flight mechanism, dumping cortisol and adrenaline into our blood stream, intensifying the already scary emotions.

 

We think we are in real danger. The mind is in panic mode as emotional fear freezes us. We may try to fight our triggers fears the first couple of firings, however in due time, we freeze to the constant eruption of cortisol and panic.

 

What can we do?

 

Understand emotions are fleeting, ephemeral and transparent.

 

That means emotions come and go, over and over again. They arrive, stay a while then exit.  They are like ghosts, coming and going on their own.  

 

Count how many emotions you experience in an hour.

 

We all have the same amount of emotions. An emotion definitely does not define any of us.

 

Buddhist have no words for emotions, being present and aware is more important.

 

So we need to experience our emotions fully then release them.

 

We try to make good feelings or happiness last and bad feeling end.

 

 

That engages us in a tug of war we always lose.

 

 

Our greatest strength is our ability to experience these emotions then let them go.

 

We are not engaging cognitively or emotionally, we are focusing on the breath, exploring the body sensations with curiosity.

 

What fires together wires together. Where we place our attention thrives, where we withdraw our attention, whither and dies.

 

Know your emotions do not impact your thoughts. Discount your thoughts and emotions attached to them.

 

Why wrestle with past thought when life is passing us by.

 


Trade thought and emotion for the only place happiness thrives, now.

 

 

Observe from a distance, see the big picture.
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Are thoughts real, accurate or maybe noise

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Where do thoughts originate? Neuroscientists say 60,000 cross our path everyday on average. That is more than one every second.

 

60 thoughts every minute. Not one of those thoughts will lead you to happiness or healing. Spend your time handling these thoughts and you will waste your entire life.

 

Suffering will be your companion on this journey.


Those who suffer value these thoughts and give them power.


Attention and belief powers them inside our minds.


Sounds so simple to say let go and stay present.

 

These words mean nothing, it is the action of doing that frees us.


Meditation/Mindfulness is not an intellectual property. You can not read a book, take a class or think your way to healing or happiness.


Meditation/Mindfulness has to be practiced. You have to sit quietly with your mind and observe, let go and trust.

 

It sounds extremely simple.

 

It is not!
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How do we motivate ourselves?

Photo by Kenrick Mills on Unsplash

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First, a positive attitude is essential. How many depressed people seem motivated? That first step is a formidable one for a seriously depressed person.


Second, an emotional purpose reigns supreme. Write down your purpose and the daily activity to fulfill your purpose. Get it out of your head, on paper with the ability to look at it realistically.


We can distort anything that remains in our minds only. Meditation allows us to let go of the judgments and stay present. In this moment, unencumbered by thought motivation seems easier.


We yearn to be free again, the ability to relax, to enjoy the simple things in life. Is that emotionally charged enough for you to take daily action?

 

Next, it is much easier to take on smaller, specific tasks, to start our journey. We eat the elephant one bite at a time, we develop great focus starting with ten minutes a day.

 

We need to realize daily exertion of energy and desire over long periods of time accomplishes much more for us.

 

Accountability is also important. Write down your day to day goals. We can commit to all out effort. I may not succeed but I will show up and practice with passion. It is half the battle.

 

Give yourself praise for your effort. Leave accomplishment alone for a while. Observe, not judge your performance.


Reward yourself, self soothe with kind words and actions.

 

Smile, your perception shapes your attitude. Believe in yourself and it will come true.

 

It is a process, a journey not a destination.

 

Remember happiness is right now, not tomorrow or ten years from now.


Act like it and enjoy the journey, the details, life.

 

Please share your motivational secrets.
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Dissolve your problems: “Breath to Breath”

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If you’ve sat with the breath for even a few minutes, you’ve seen that this practice is an open invitation for everything inside you to come up.

 

You see your wild mind, which we all have, and which can be quite overwhelming at first. 

 

It has been there all along, of course, but this concentration has brought it into relief.

 

The ultimate goal—though this is no easy thing and takes time to develop—is to allow everything to come up, with all its energy: 

 

all of, for instance, your anger and loneliness and despair, to allow these things to arise and be transformed by the light of awareness. 

 

There is tremendous energy in these states, and much of the time we suppress them, so that we not only lose all the energy that is in them but also expend a great deal keeping them down. 

 

What we gradually learn is to let these things come up and be transformed, to release their energy. 

 

You don’t solve your problems in this practice, it is sometimes said, you dissolve them. 

 

But the wild mind that we all confront when we start discourages many practitioners. 

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Another look at Worry


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Worry seems to have its own engine, a way of entering our consciousness without an invitation. It seems to be one of the function of our mind, everyone has worried, some incessantly.


When we worry the mind is engaged cognitively in the past and future, it’s speed increases. Awareness of reality, of this present moment, disappears when the mind speeds up.


Fear enters our consciousness with the possible consequences of our worry. Mental confusion makes it difficult to move, to take action, to let go of this created problem (Worry).

 

Worry seems to be a battle between the what if’s in life and living freely.  Worry in a way is a prediction of future doom created inside our doubts and fears.

 

So for me, my first task when confronting worry, is to slow my mind. I slow my breath, try to slow my heart and focus intently below the thoughts and emotions.

 

I know when my mind is racing, trouble is coming.


We always have our practice to slow us down and bring us back to now.


Worry does not exist with a mind that is present, empty and focused on the senses.

 

Worry will still visit but the stay will be shorter.
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What is the mind? : “Meditation for the Love of it”

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According to the tantras, the phenomenon we experience as “mind” is actually a particularly vibrant and subtle kind of energy.

 


An ocean of energy, in fact, in which waves of thoughts and emotions arise and subside.


Your thoughts and feelings—the difficult, negative, obsessive ones, as well as the peaceful and clever ones—are all made of the same subtle, invisible, highly dynamic “stuff.”

 

Mindenergy is so evanescent that it can dissolve in a moment, yet so powerful that it can create “stories” that run you for a lifetime.

 


The secret revealed by the tantric sages is that if you can recognize thoughts for what they are—if you can see that a thought is nothing but mind-energy—your thoughts will stop troubling you.

 

That doesn’t mean they’ll stop.

 

But you’ll no longer be at their mercy.
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Definitions:

* Tantra denotes the esoteric traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism that co-developed most likely about the middle of the 1st millennium AD. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable “text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice”.

 

* evanescent
ev·a·nes·cent: adjective
soon passing out of sight, memory, or existence; quickly fading or disappearing

“a shimmering evanescent bubble”
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Wasting precious time

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Well, which is it, half full or empty?

 

This  judgment wastes precious time, time spent without a chance for wellbeing.

 

Better to have the mind empty than filled with useless judgments.


Actually it is 4 ounces in an 8 ounce glass, if you want to be accurate. Neither half full or empty.   Add an ounce and do we say 60/40?  Who cares?

 

Waste it on life’s half full or empty judgments and lose.

 

We have to be able to let these easy judgments go or the emotionally charged ones will run our life.

 

Try letting go of as many judgments as possible today.

 

Make more room for being in the space where happy lives.
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