Posts Tagged ‘Thoughts’

People who enjoy the most wellbeing _______ ?

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People who enjoy the most wellbeing let the constant flow of thoughts pass on through, unattended.


Some have done this with no meditation practice, just an innate knowing life is most vibrant right now, empty of thought.

 

We travel to exotic places at the ends of the earth on vacation to see the sights, not think about them.

 

We could stay at home and think about the places in outer space we can not reach.

 

For the majority of us, a daily meditation practice, is the tool we use to release thought and stay focused on now.

 

Twenty focused minutes a day can bring change.

 

We have to work, take daily action to train our mind.

 

Depends if you desire thought to rule your mind or you would rather captain this ship.
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Fear part two: our perception

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The mechanism of fear (fight or flight mechanism) contains no fear inside itself. It is just our defense mechanism, preparing us for a perceived lethal threat.

 

PTSD has temporary access to the switch activating our adrenal stress response (fight or flight). Real danger is never present when my childhood PTSD activates now.

 

Think about that! No real danger can exist when my abuser is dead. He can not hurt me now.

 

The fear created comes from the storyline I add.

 

With my focused breath, I can dissipate the Tunnel Vision, the Auditory Exclusion, the Loss of fine motor skills, the Tai-chi-Psyche, and the increased heart rate, blood pressure and respiration.

What is left?

 

Our trauma thoughts and emotions standing by themselves.

So much easier to live with and heal when our fight or flight mechanism does not scare us.

 

Our defense mechanism is there to help save our life, not make it a living hell.
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Healing from childhood abuse

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Trauma is stored in the right amygdala as implicit memory at the time it occurs.

 

It is stored along side your capabilities at that age.  Abused at five or ten and you feel like a child when trauma erupts. 

 

Part of healing integrates this trauma to the present moment.

 

My trauma is many decades old and my abuser is dead, so real danger is a mirage in real life.

 

The adrenaline and cortisol that jolts my nervous system is real. Our fight or flight mechanism is broken, reading danger everywhere.

 

Our goal is to integrate this implicit memory to now. We are not a 10-year-old anymore and have many more skills and alternatives now.

 

Our trauma happened before our minds developed fully thus confusing development with trauma.

 

Know the mechanism and characteristics of your abuse.  Write your triggers down to limit their power and their ability to impact your nervous system.

 

Develop a plan and a daily practice to confront this disorder.

 

Take action!

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My Thoughts are Endless!

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Thoughts are definitely my issue. I can discount the emotion attached to a thought or at least lessen the impact.

 

Thoughts spring from an unknown well, deep inside the cavern of our mind. We are not responsible for their content or origin.

 

 

Some thoughts shock me. I never would consider behaving in a manner detailed by some of my thoughts. Seems my “Ego” is insulted easily, seeks retribution or even revenge on that offending person. Wishing bad luck on them appears in vivid illustration and joy. Oh my, that is not me is it?

 

 

For me, letting my mind ruminate or wander aimlessly leads to trouble. In our default mode thoughts look into the unworthiness of the “I” we created. That is a target rich environment for me.

 

 

I am the happiest when I am in the moment, observing life, judging little and smiling more.

 

 

When my PTSD is triggered, thoughts arrive at a staggering rate and intensity. Combined with cortisol, adrenaline and the other physiological changes, these thoughts can wield enormous power.

 

 

Thinking becomes irrational when triggers ignite. We believe crazy thoughts easily. Fear and anxiety accelerate our pace of thinking and avoiding.

 


My relief arrives when I focus on my breath, intently, letting go of the thought, choosing to breathe into the body sensations.

 


I watch my thoughts fade when possible.  Very, very empowering to see thoughts fade, emotions melt and the mind find clarity.
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Attachment to things influences our mood, behavior, wellbeing

The Tennis Court Oath of the French Revolution.

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Our moods ebb and tide. Thoughts and emotions impact these changes.

 


The Zen Buddhists point the finger at attachment, identifying with our thoughts and “Ego.”

 

Judging an event, a person, or a situation attaches a ball and chain around our ankle.

 

 

We will defend, argue and sometimes fight to uphold that judgment. This is exhausting and drains vital energy.

 

 

Judgment is “Ego” based, emotionally charged. I, me, mine can be pissed, enraged, jealous, anxious, traumatized or joyful.

 

 

These emotions and moods can change instantly with external stimuli or focused attention.

 

 

Look at this election, people hating for their attachment to one party or the other, belief in a proposition.

 

 

Strong negative emotions remove us from our chance at happiness.

 

 

Hate and happiness are never in the same ballpark, never linked.

 


Where one is present the other is absent.
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Triggers part two,,2,,

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Let’s be realistic about our expectations. Our healing path will have set backs, frustrating results, intense anxiety mixed with fear.

 

Our trauma (PTSD) has access to our fight or flight mechanism. A trigger thought, a sound or smell ignites our fight or flight mechanism. We are preparing for a lethal threat from the past, but none currently exists.

 

PTSD is a mirage, a stored implicit memory of trauma. The physical changes and drugs our body secretes are real.

 

There is no real danger, just our own defense mechanism. Hopefully, this wisdom helps us resist avoiding, ruminating or freezing (shutting down).

 

In my mindfulness group, if someone is triggered, I trace five slow, intense breaths with them. Eyes open, I sit across from them, tracing the breathing track together.

 

I reassure them of their safety, using slow breaths to dissipate the cortisol and adrenaline. They are instructed to let go of the storyline and absorb the cortisol with their slow exhales.

 

It may take five or more breaths. They realize you can impact PTSD fear and anxiety.

 

It surprises them when things calm a bit. The intense fear and anxiety can be influenced.

 

PTSD loses some power each time we focus, let go and breathe deeply.

 

Our fearful thoughts and judgments soften and fade.


Each time we let the storyline go, we inch closer to wellbeing.

 


This is when PTSD is at its strongest, triggering the fight or flight mechanism. We fear triggers so much we avoid people and situations that ignite our trauma.

 


This is also the time when PTSD is at its most vulnerable.

 

If you can entertain the thought that PTSD is a bluff, that no real power or danger is present, healing is possible.

 


If we can stay present, focused, PTSD loses power.

 

 

You will discover no real danger exists inside our defense mechanism.

 

 

With practice we can learn to accept the anxious, scary mechanism as normal.

 

 

My fight or flight mechanism does not fire around my triggers anymore.

 


You can also integrate your trauma and calm your nervous system!

Continue reading

The Moment Before

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“Well,” said Pooh,

 

“what I like best,”

 

and then he had to stop and think.

 

Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do,

 

there was a moment just before you began to eat it

 
which was better than when you were,

 

 

but he didn’t know what it was called.

 

~A.A. Milne
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My two cents: Even a simple mind can exhibit clarity and awareness of his/her inner world.

 

 

Studies have demonstrated that the most enjoyable part of a vacation can be the planning and anticipation of the trip.

 

 


Satisfaction rarely lives up to our emotional desires.

 

 


Satisfaction never quenches the ever-present desire for more.

 

 

 

Pooh realizes that the anticipation carries the most weight, not the fulfillment.
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