Posts Tagged ‘Suicide’

A great friend loses her battle with Bipolar disorder

 

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I found out Thursday at my mindfulness group, Mechelle had committed suicide. She had a troubled childhood complicated by bipolar symptoms.


This news was shocking for all that knew her. She had changed her life, exhibited incredible bravery, discipline and focus. I met her at NAMI, she was a volunteer, always helping others to a fault.


I have facilitated a mindfulness group for five years. Mechelle improved the most, overcame the most and worked the hardest of anyone in those five years. She was an inspiration to others in my group. Her insight always made a great dynamic foil for my technical expertise.


This is shocking for all that knew her. I have been lost, scratching my head, trying to understand. Balancing her meds  brought intense fear into her life. She had other stressors she kept secret.


We will never find out what happened. Her life was the best for three or four years until something went wrong.


For me, not being a trained therapist.  I now see the danger of helping at risk people. Earlier this year I received a text from Jennifer’s niece. Jenifer followed me the longest, healed and found self worth for the first time in her life.


She also made great strides in healing. A few months ago that text informed me she passed away overnight.  


This year I have lost the two ladies that I have helped the most. It shakes me to my core. After much thought, my take is that I helped them enjoy the best part of their lives.  

I judge my giving as positive and my journey more difficult than I imagined. I see how life is so unfair.


It reminds me that all we have is today. We may be gone tomorrow. Hug those you love and tell them, express it.

 

 

http://www.mentalhealthportland.org/mental-health-system-needs-support-by-mechelle-stone/
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Like a busy emergency room’: Calls to suicide crisis centers double since 2014 7:50 am EDT July 20, 2018

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The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline saw calls double from 2014 to 2017, an increase that coincides with rising suicide rates in the USA.

 

The lifeline answered more than 2 million calls in 2017, up from 1 million calls in 2014, according to its latest figures. More than 1.5 million calls reached the prevention network in 2015 and again in 2016.

 

The nationwide group includes more than 150 crisis centers, plus national backup centers to assist local lines.

 

The recent high-profile suicides of celebrities Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain have led to more public attention about the issue and various helpline services available nationwide, prompting more people to call.

 

“Due to media events and increased public awareness of suicide prevention and the lifeline’s services, more people are aware of this resource and are getting help and support,” spokeswoman Frances Gonzalez said. “The lifeline has been proven to de-escalate moments of crisis and help people find hope.”

 

Suicide rates increased more than 25 percent from 1999 to 2016, according to the latest figures by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released June 7.

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Opioid lawsuit targets rich family behind drug that fueled US crisis Sackler family, which owns Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, accused of fueling addiction while boosting profits

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The Guardian:
Joanna Walters and agencies
Tue 12 Jun 2018

 

The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.
The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.

 

The state of Massachusetts on Tuesday sued the maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, which has been blamed for spawning America’s opioids crisis, naming leading executives and members of the multibillionaire Sackler family that owns the pharmaceutical company.

The lawsuit accuses the company, Purdue Pharma, of spinning a “web of illegal deceit” to fuel the deadly drug abuse crisis while boosting profits.

Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died
Maura Healey, state attorney general
Purdue Pharma is already defending lawsuits from several states and local governments, but Massachusetts is the first state to take the unusual step of personally naming the company’s executives in a complaint, the state attorney general, Maura Healey, said. It names 16 current and former executives and board members, including the chief executive, Craig Landau, and eight members across three generations of the Sackler family that wholly owns Purdue.

The lawsuit alleges Purdue deceived patients and doctors about the risks of opioids, pushed prescribers to keep patients on the drugs longer and aggressively targeted vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and veterans.

“Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died,” Healey said on Tuesday.

Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, issued a statement saying it vigorously denied all the allegations and looked forward to presenting “substantial defenses” to the claims in the lawsuit.

“We share the attorney general’s concern about the opioid crisis. We are disappointed, however, that in the midst of good faith negotiations with many states, the commonwealth [of Massachusetts] has decided to pursue a costly and protracted litigation process. We will continue to work collaboratively with the states toward bringing meaningful solutions,” it stated.

Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.
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Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.

 

Purdue, along with some other painkiller makers and drug distributors, is currently facing more than 300 lawsuits from city and county authorities across the country. The lawsuits have been corralled into one multi-district case in a federal court in Ohio. The judge in that case has been pushing for a huge, quick settlement to compensate victims and assist in what the government has admitted is a public health crisis, in the way the so-called “Big Tobacco settlement” happened against cigarette companies in the 1990s. But some experts are calling for the case to go to trial in order to oblige the pharmaceutical companies to produce more evidence in the discovery process.

 

 

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My two cents: common sense

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Seems to me that having success, rivaling the lifestyles of the rich and famous, may not lead to inner peace.

 

 

Inner peace must not be linked to iconic success, stardom, power, luxury or approval.

 

The Buddhists have always said these are impermanent, ephemeral and fleeting.

 

We sure enter this world and leave it bare ass and vulnerable.

 

Why value things we do not take with us?

 

 

So where does inner peace live?

 

 

I know that inner peace cohabitates with gratitude and giving!

 

 

It thrives in the absence of ego, where desire exists in perspective (balance) and being present dominates life.

 

 

Where do you think inner peace thrives?
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Check in with those we know are at risk of depression, ptsd, self-harm or Suicide!!!

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Search out your friends who maybe at risk of self harm or suicide.

 

Visit, call, Skype, or text a friend at risk.

 

Make contact even if it is to tell them you care for them!

 

Your kindness may save their life that day.

 

Giving is such a boomerang of goodness, for us and for those we give freely to.

 

Show someone you love them unconditionally.

 

It costs nothing to save a life with kindness.

 

Reach out even if you feel it could be awkward.
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The risk of ‘contagion’ after suicides is real 6:01 AM EDT June 9, 2018

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My mindfulness group is inside a NAMI office.   They give mental health support for free.

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By Jacqueline Howard, CNN

“American fashion designer Kate Spade was found dead in her Manhattan apartment in an apparent suicide on Tuesday. 

Then on Friday morning, CNN’s Anthony Bourdain, the chef and storyteller who took viewers around the world in “Parts Unknown,” was found unresponsive in his hotel room in France. The cause of death was suicide.

Mental health experts agree that several high-profile celebrity suicides could possibly cause an increased risk of what’s called suicide contagion, and that all of us should be aware of the risk factors related to suicide.

 

Suicide contagion is a process in which the suicide of one person or multiple people can contribute to a rise in suicidal behaviors among others, especially those who already have suicidal thoughts or a known risk factor for suicide.

 

“If they’re already struggling with thoughts of depression or risk of suicide, they’re already trying to get information about how other people are experiencing it,” said John Ackerman, suicide prevention coordinator in the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

 

“Especially when you’ve got high-profile people who are successful and who the world views as having a lot going for them and they die by suicide, it can generate feelings of hopelessness.”

 

There was a 9.85% increase in suicides — an additional 1,841 deaths — recorded in the United States in the four months following comedian Robin Williams’ death by suicide in 2014, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE in February.

 

That study was based on monthly suicide data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, dated from 1999 to 2015. 

 

 

The researchers then analyzed that data, taking a close look at suicide rates before and after his death.

 

“In the story with Robin Williams, you saw a 10% increase in deaths especially among middle-aged men using the method that was described,” said Ackerman, who was not involved in that previous study.

 

“So we get concerned with celebrity suicides because when there’s lots of attention and lots of specific reporting about it in a sensational way people may be more likely to identify with that person,” he said.

 

Suicide contagion has also been studied within schools, military units, groups of friends, and families.

 

“Following exposure to suicide or suicidal behaviors within one’s family or peer group, suicide risk can be minimized by having family members, friends, peers, and colleagues of the victim evaluated by a mental health professional. 

 

Persons deemed at risk for suicide should then be referred for additional mental health services,” according to the US Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Risk factors for suicide

 

Globally, close to 800,000 people die due to suicide every year, which is about one person every 40 seconds, according to the World Health Organization. 

 

In 2015, more than 78% of those global suicides occurred in low- and middle-income countries.

 

In the US, suicide rates significantly increased in 44 states from 1999 through 2016, rising by more than 30% in 25 states, according to a new Vital Signs report published by the CDC on Thursday.

 

Nearly 45,000 lives were lost to suicide in 2016, according to that report. More than half of people who died by suicide did not have a known mental health condition, and various circumstances contributed to suicides among those with and without known conditions.

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Anthony Bourdain, RIP

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CNN confirmed Bourdain’s death on Friday and said the cause of death was suicide.

 

 

“It is with extraordinary sadness we can confirm the death of our friend and colleague, Anthony Bourdain,” the network said in a statement Friday morning. “His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller. His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much. Our thoughts and prayers are with his daughter and family at this incredibly difficult time.”

 

 

Bourdain was in France working on an upcoming episode of his award-winning CNN series “Parts Unknown.” His close friend Eric Ripert, the French chef, found Bourdain unresponsive in his hotel room Friday morning.

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