Posts Tagged ‘Suicide’

3 veterans die of suicide over 5 days at VA facilities in 2 states Travis Fedschun

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Three U.S. military veterans took their lives within 5 days of each other at VA facilities in 2 states earlier this month, prompting a call for action by lawmakers.

 

The first death was reported on April 5, when the body of 29-year-old Gary Pressley was discovered inside a vehicle in the parking lot of Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dublin, Georgia.

 

Pressley had a gunshot wound in his chest and was pronounced dead at 8:45 p.m., Laurens County Coroner Richard Stanley told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 

Pressley’s family said he was medically discharged in 2012 after a bad car accident and struggling with mental health care, according to the newspaper.

 

His mother, Machelle Wilson, told WMAZ-TV that Pressley’s sister called the VA to tell them her brother was threatening suicide from their parking lot just moments before he killed himself

 

“He told his girlfriend he was going to do it in the parking lot, so they could find his body, so somebody can pay attention to what’s happening, so other vets do not have to go through this,” she told the television station.


Twenty veterans take their lives each day; national security correspondent Jennifer Griffin reports.

 

The following day in Decatur, Ga., 68-year-old Olen Hancock of Alpharetta killed himself outside the Atlanta VA Medical Center. Hancock had been seen pacing the lobby of the building before going outside and shooting himself, WSB-TV reported.

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Western Michigan University: Suicide Prevention Program

 

 

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Facts About Suicide

 

Suicide is preventable. Most suicidal individuals desperately want to live; they are just unable to see alternatives to their problems.


Most suicidal individuals give definite warnings of their suicidal intentions, but others are either unaware of the significance of these warnings or do not know how to respond to them.

 

Talking about suicide does not cause someone to be suicidal.
Suicide occurs across all age, economic, social, racial and ethnic boundaries.

 

Suicidal behavior is complex and not a response to one problem that a person is experiencing. Some risk factors vary with age, gender, or ethnic group and may occur in combination or change over time.

 

Surviving family members not only suffer the trauma of losing a loved one to suicide, they may themselves be at higher risk for suicide and emotional problems.


NATIONAL STATISTICS

 

Statistics are based on the latest year for which we have national statistics, 2016.
U.S.A Suicide: 2015 Official Final Data

 

Suicide is currently the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. This translates into an annual suicide rate of approximately 14 per 100,000 people dying a year by suicide (44,193 a year), out-ranking homicides (ranked as the 16th leading cause of death).


The suicide rates decreased from 1990-2000 from 12.5 to 10.4 suicides per 100,000. Over the past decade, however, the rate has again increased. Every day, approximately 121 Americans die by suicide or approximately one person kills themselves every 12 minutes. (CDC)


In 2015, there were 1,104,825 attempted suicide in the United States. Approximately one person attempts suicide every 31 seconds.


It is generally estimated that there are 25 attempts for one death by suicide.
Between 25 and 50 percent of people who kill themselves had previously attempted suicide. Those who have made suicide attempts are at higher risk for actually taking their own lives.


Each suicide intimately effects at least six other people (estimated). In 2013, it was estimated that one in every 63 Americans became a suicide-loss survivor.


The most commonly reported means of completing suicide, across all groups, was by firearm (49.8%), followed by suffocation or hanging (26.8%), poisoning (15.4), cutting (1.7%) and drowning (1.2%).


Mental health diagnoses are generally associated with a higher rate of suicide. Psychological autopsy studies reflect that more than 90 percent of completed suicides had one or more mental disorders, most notably depression. (NAMI)

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PTSD picks the very, very brave soldiers, also

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“Hacksaw Ridge”

“The true story of Pfc. Desmond T. Doss, who won the Congressional Medal of Honor despite refusing to bear arms during WWII on religious grounds. Doss was drafted and ostracized by fellow soldiers for his pacifist stance but went on to earn respect and adoration for his bravery, selflessness and compassion after he risked his life — without firing a shot — in the Battle of Okinawa.”

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Over a 12 hour period, demonstrating superhuman strength and courage, he lowered 75 wounded comrades to safety. Two days later he returned to that Ridge and was wounded.

 


The movie ends with this euphoric life of grandeur, Desmond lauded and decorated with fame and glory. The real story was he suffered from crippling PTSD the rest of his life. He lived as an invalid for years, depending on his wife to take care of him. Nightmares haunted him until death.

 

 

The idea that weak soldiers get PTSD and strong ones do not, is almost abusive in nature.

 

 

This statement pisses me off and violates everything my blog and volunteering stands for.

 

There is a small percentage of people who are resistant to PTSD but that is under 5%. The rest of us are vulnerable. In battle placing a soldier at the front for extended periods increases PTSD significantly. Redeployments have also added to this epidemic of not only PTSD but suicides.

 


Soldiers with PTSD will not seek help if you strengthen that stigma of being weak causes PTSD.   This statement could not be more ignorant or uninformed.

 

Being vulnerable, accepting our weakness are part of the healing journey.
22 suicides a day is the opposite.
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A great friend loses her battle with Bipolar disorder

 

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I found out Thursday at my mindfulness group, Mechelle had committed suicide. She had a troubled childhood complicated by bipolar symptoms.


This news was shocking for all that knew her. She had changed her life, exhibited incredible bravery, discipline and focus. I met her at NAMI, she was a volunteer, always helping others to a fault.


I have facilitated a mindfulness group for five years. Mechelle improved the most, overcame the most and worked the hardest of anyone in those five years. She was an inspiration to others in my group. Her insight always made a great dynamic foil for my technical expertise.


This is shocking for all that knew her. I have been lost, scratching my head, trying to understand. Balancing her meds  brought intense fear into her life. She had other stressors she kept secret.


We will never find out what happened. Her life was the best for three or four years until something went wrong.


For me, not being a trained therapist.  I now see the danger of helping at risk people. Earlier this year I received a text from Jennifer’s niece. Jenifer followed me the longest, healed and found self worth for the first time in her life.


She also made great strides in healing. A few months ago that text informed me she passed away overnight.  


This year I have lost the two ladies that I have helped the most. It shakes me to my core. After much thought, my take is that I helped them enjoy the best part of their lives.  

I judge my giving as positive and my journey more difficult than I imagined. I see how life is so unfair.


It reminds me that all we have is today. We may be gone tomorrow. Hug those you love and tell them, express it.

 

 

http://www.mentalhealthportland.org/mental-health-system-needs-support-by-mechelle-stone/
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Like a busy emergency room’: Calls to suicide crisis centers double since 2014 7:50 am EDT July 20, 2018

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The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline saw calls double from 2014 to 2017, an increase that coincides with rising suicide rates in the USA.

 

The lifeline answered more than 2 million calls in 2017, up from 1 million calls in 2014, according to its latest figures. More than 1.5 million calls reached the prevention network in 2015 and again in 2016.

 

The nationwide group includes more than 150 crisis centers, plus national backup centers to assist local lines.

 

The recent high-profile suicides of celebrities Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain have led to more public attention about the issue and various helpline services available nationwide, prompting more people to call.

 

“Due to media events and increased public awareness of suicide prevention and the lifeline’s services, more people are aware of this resource and are getting help and support,” spokeswoman Frances Gonzalez said. “The lifeline has been proven to de-escalate moments of crisis and help people find hope.”

 

Suicide rates increased more than 25 percent from 1999 to 2016, according to the latest figures by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released June 7.

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Opioid lawsuit targets rich family behind drug that fueled US crisis Sackler family, which owns Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, accused of fueling addiction while boosting profits

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The Guardian:
Joanna Walters and agencies
Tue 12 Jun 2018

 

The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.
The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.

 

The state of Massachusetts on Tuesday sued the maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, which has been blamed for spawning America’s opioids crisis, naming leading executives and members of the multibillionaire Sackler family that owns the pharmaceutical company.

The lawsuit accuses the company, Purdue Pharma, of spinning a “web of illegal deceit” to fuel the deadly drug abuse crisis while boosting profits.

Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died
Maura Healey, state attorney general
Purdue Pharma is already defending lawsuits from several states and local governments, but Massachusetts is the first state to take the unusual step of personally naming the company’s executives in a complaint, the state attorney general, Maura Healey, said. It names 16 current and former executives and board members, including the chief executive, Craig Landau, and eight members across three generations of the Sackler family that wholly owns Purdue.

The lawsuit alleges Purdue deceived patients and doctors about the risks of opioids, pushed prescribers to keep patients on the drugs longer and aggressively targeted vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and veterans.

“Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died,” Healey said on Tuesday.

Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, issued a statement saying it vigorously denied all the allegations and looked forward to presenting “substantial defenses” to the claims in the lawsuit.

“We share the attorney general’s concern about the opioid crisis. We are disappointed, however, that in the midst of good faith negotiations with many states, the commonwealth [of Massachusetts] has decided to pursue a costly and protracted litigation process. We will continue to work collaboratively with the states toward bringing meaningful solutions,” it stated.

Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.
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Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.

 

Purdue, along with some other painkiller makers and drug distributors, is currently facing more than 300 lawsuits from city and county authorities across the country. The lawsuits have been corralled into one multi-district case in a federal court in Ohio. The judge in that case has been pushing for a huge, quick settlement to compensate victims and assist in what the government has admitted is a public health crisis, in the way the so-called “Big Tobacco settlement” happened against cigarette companies in the 1990s. But some experts are calling for the case to go to trial in order to oblige the pharmaceutical companies to produce more evidence in the discovery process.

 

 

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My two cents: common sense

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Seems to me that having success, rivaling the lifestyles of the rich and famous, may not lead to inner peace.

 

 

Inner peace must not be linked to iconic success, stardom, power, luxury or approval.

 

The Buddhists have always said these are impermanent, ephemeral and fleeting.

 

We sure enter this world and leave it bare ass and vulnerable.

 

Why value things we do not take with us?

 

 

So where does inner peace live?

 

 

I know that inner peace cohabitates with gratitude and giving!

 

 

It thrives in the absence of ego, where desire exists in perspective (balance) and being present dominates life.

 

 

Where do you think inner peace thrives?
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