Posts Tagged ‘..self talk’

The Science of Self-Talk: Rumination

johnhain / 1133 images

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It’s important to note here that negative emotion (or negative affect) is not necessarily your enemy. It’s how you think about negative emotions that makes them negative.

In other words, how you represent negative emotions to yourself in your own self-talk is the key ingredient that turns them into real negativity. How so?

Researchers studying depression have figured out that people with clinical depression have a kind of compulsive destructive self-talk.

Psychologists call it rumination, and its characteristic is repetitively going over symptoms of distress, like a scab you keep obsessively picking at.

Its other characteristic is passivity. You don’t focus on solutions but problems.

So you have a negative emotion, such as sadness, but, on top of that sadness, you’re telling yourself this toxic story:

It’s all useless, I can’t do anything right. I’ve been stuck in this same position forever and I’ll never get out of it.

Dysfunctional self-talk tells a story. It’s the wrong kind of story, a story in which you’re passive and helpless.

In constructive self-talk, on the other hand, you see yourself as someone who can achieve your goals. That doesn’t just lift your mood.

It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you see yourself as capable, then you have the right perspective to become capable.

That puts you in the driver’s seat.

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My two cents: Self talk: “Edward Bourne PhD. Anxiety specialist: “It is so automatic and subtle you don’t notice it or the effect it has on your moods and feelings. It appears in telegraphic form- one short word or image (”Oh no!) contains a whole series of thoughts, memories, or associations. Anxious.18th self-talk is typically irrational but almost always sounds like the truth.
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Enquiring minds want to know::::: .Stoner Shakespeare? Scientists say pipes from playwright’s garden contain canabis.

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Did the greatest playwright the world has ever known have a taste for the wacky tobaccy? Did William Shakespeare have a case of the munchies while penning “Macbeth”?
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The answer may very well be “yes” after a group of South African scientists found that clay pipes recovered from the garden of the Bard’s home contain traces of cannabis.
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The researchers examined fragments of 24 clay pipes that were recovered from the garden of Shakespeare’s home in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, as well as from surrounding houses. After examining the fragments using a gas chromatography technique, the scientists found that eight of the pipes contained traces of cannabis, one contained nicotine, and two contained traces of cocaine derived from Peruvian coca leaves.
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Professor Francis Thackeray of the University of Witwatersrand, who headed the study, writes that several kinds of tobacco were known to early 17th-century Englishmen. The earliest specimens of nicotine and coca leaves may have been imported by explorers Walter Raleigh and Francis Drake, respectively.
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Thackeray has a longstanding interest in Shakespeare’s possible use of drugs. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that in 1999, he wrote an academic paper titled “Hemp as a source of inspiration for Shakespearean literature?”
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This may all be much ado about nothing, as there’s no conclusive evidence that Shakespeare ever used cannabis himself. However, Thackeray notes that early performances of Shakespeare’s works likely took place in smoke-filled rooms full of puffing members of the Elizabethan gentry.
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“One can well imagine the scenario in which Shakespeare performed his plays in the court of Queen Elizabeth, in the company of Drake, Raleigh and others who smoked clay pipes filled with ‘tobacco’,” he writes.
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A case of smoke them if you’ve got them, perhaps.
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Self talk: “It is so automatic and subtle you don’t notice it”

  
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Edward Bourne PhD. Anxiety specialist:
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“It is so automatic and subtle
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you don’t notice it or
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the effect it has on
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your moods and feelings.
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It appears in telegraphic form-
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one short word or image
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(”Oh no!)
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contains a whole series of thoughts,
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memories, or associations.
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Anxious self-talk is typically irrational but almost always sounds like the truth.
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Negative self-talk perpetuates avoidance.
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Self-talk can initiate or aggravate a panic attack.”
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my two cents
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Mindfulness searches the inner world to integrate this subconscious draw, this negative self talk in due time.
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Sit today and self talk will be laden with opportunity and optimism.
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