Posts Tagged ‘PTSD’

A case for Gratitude!

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Gratitude was a valuable, daily skill, developed with a meditation/mindfulness practice.

In the beginning, gratitude was an after thought, now it is a cornerstone of my wellbeing.

Anytime my mood dips towards sadness, I remind myself of being blessed with many things.

This is a game changer.

Instead of dissolving into a scenario of me lacking something, I enjoy being grateful for all my gifts.

Being able to stop the barrage of negative thoughts and emotions in its infancy, saves my sanity.

Anytime you feel sad, depressed, or anxious, recite your gratitude list out loud.

Write it down and look at it.

Be grateful for life, be focused, be present.

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The Complex Mind can handle simple commands

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Rick Hanson in “Buddha’s Brain” shares this: “The number of possible combinations of 100 billion neurons firing or not is approximately 10 to the millionth power, or 1 followed by a million zeros, in principle; this is the number of possible states of your brain.”

Extremely complex with incredible chances for opportunity.

Why would we choose negative stimuli to focus on?

We have a choice.

This morning we could only entertain positive, hopeful and soothing thoughts.

Hanson says:

“It’s so busy that, even though it’s only 2 percent of the body’s weight, it uses 20–25 percent of its oxygen and glucose.”

Choose optimism, a bounty of gratitude and kindness.

Choose to be present, in harmony with the earth and others.

Let being special or selfish alone.

Just be an observer for a while, letting the one who judges rest for a long while.

Can you give up judgments today?

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Mental Health, Bullying, Career Uncertainty

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These are among the top concerns for Ph.D. students, according to a new survey by Nature.

More than a third of Ph.D. students have sought help for anxiety or depression caused by Ph.D. study, according to results of a global survey of 6,300 students from Nature.

Thirty-six percent is a very large share, considering that many students who suffer don’t reach out for help.

Still, the figure parallels those found by other studies on the topic.

A 2018 study of mostly Ph.D. students, for instance, found that 39 percent of respondents scored in the moderate-to-severe depression range.

That’s compared to 6 percent of the general population measured with the same scale.

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Sunday morning Insights

Pixabay: Larisa-K

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Sufferers of PTSD, depression or other disorders are generally confused and anxious.

Fear mixed with intense anxiety stops the mind from functioning properly.

We sense danger from a perceived lethal threat. We want to escape as quickly as possible, our defense mechanism has complete control.

Unfortunately, going out in public, say to a restaurant, would fire my fight or flight mechanism without my consent.

Somehow these situations linked to my abusive childhood. Our triggers seem to pick their own scenario.

Cognitively I understood no real danger existed, my defense mechanism did not agree.

Healing for me, consisted of sitting calmly, focused on my breath, as my nervous system fired violently.

My focus released the scary thoughts, then concentrated on the connected body sensations. For me, my solar plexus is where my trauma manifested inside the body.

Making friends with the bodies nervous system, intimately knowing (being with) the sensations, integrated my trauma.

Being able to build focus on the breath is body armor for the anxiety disorders.

The breath controls our nervous system and heavily influences our defense mechanism.

Navy Seals are taught to dissipate fear by extending their exhales.

Cortisol and adrenaline can be used for fuel instead of being afraid or triggered.

PTSD has access to the switch firing our fight or flight mechanism, we have final control of our nervous system.

Remember trauma is stored in the right hemisphere, inside our amygdala.

We can not access stored trauma consciously.

Meditation grants us direct access to our stored trauma.

No miracle just current neuroscience.

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How fragile is your “Ego”?

Pixabay: johnhain

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Some of our most accomplished athletes and artists have extremely fragile “Egos”.

Accomplishments, possessions, or status only hide unworthiness, shame and guilt.

Many times fear of loss, embarrassment or ridicule drives us to overachieve.

Overachievement gave my “Ego” cover, a place to hide its shame.

External possessions merely cover up that fragile “Ego” with powerful looking facades. Athletic stardom gave my “Ego” the mirage of looking confident, complete.

Unworthiness must be hidden away. We feel our “Ego” could be annihilated if our unworthiness is exposed publicly.

We live in fear of being discovered as unworthy, down to our core.

The “Ego” craves shiny objects that bring approval.

An “Ego” exposed to childhood trauma feels damaged, broken, not deserving love.

Our “Ego” did not form a healthy attachment with our first caregivers.

This unworthiness is at the core of all our suffering in later life.

This can be repaired later in life, but not without intense work.

Can you detect your “Ego” when he/she is out front?

Any strong emotion or upset summons our personal identity.

Remember we create the “Ego” for identity, not to make any decisions, and definitely not to run our life.

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Decisions: First one with PTSD

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Trauma has impacted our life negatively. After the initial period of discovering what PTSD is and how to improve, we make an important decision.

We were all victims at one time or we would not have PTSD. Now, we must decide, do we continue behaving as a victim or do we take responsibility and try to heal?

If we consult the statistics on suicides and the epidemic nature of PTSD in the world, many decide to stay a victims.

I have witnessed over and over how PTSD destroys peoples lives. PTSD gets worse with time and behaving as a victim, empowers it.

The decision is simple, take responsibility or live a victims existence.

No healing or happiness is experienced as a victim.

It seems an easy decision, common sense, but PTSD is an irrational disorder, ruled by extreme fear and distortion.

The decision is much easier if we develop a few skills to help us heal.

It is the road less traveled.

It takes incredible courage, then a willpower to take action in the face of fear.

It takes concrete baby steps repeated over and over.

We can decide to fight for our freedom at anytime.

Somehow, we must focus, clear the fog of PTSD, to see our suffering is caused by our own behavior.

We have to take risks to heal.

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Dealing with our fight or flight mechanism firing violently!

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PTSD reaches its most terrifying peak when a trigger explodes violently, preparing us for a perceived lethal threat.

So another counterintuitive moment arrives in the face of healing from PTSD. At its peak, the most powerful moment, PTSD is also at its most vulnerable.

PTSD is a bluff. I have never read this from a book or heard it from a therapist, it is my personal experience.

A violently firing PTSD trigger is the greatest opportunity to heal we will ever receive.

PTSD can not play defense.

If we can focus and stay present during a trigger erupting, some integration will occur.

In layman terms PTSD will lose power when we stay present, empty of thought, focused on the breath, or body sensations.

Our thoughts add the fear to our fight or flight mechanism. There is no fear contained inside our defense mechanism.

Fear is created by our negative judgments and trauma memories kept alive by scary thoughts. PTSD is a disorder that thrives in the past then brings constant worry into our future.

PTSD will die if forced to live in the present moment. PTSD needs duration in our consciousness.

PTSD needs rumination, time spent thinking, or judging to fuel this destructive disorder.

PTSD gets worse with time not better. If you want to heal from PTSD, first make friends with your fight or flight mechanism, your nervous system.

Sit quietly, focus, explore your inner world.

PTSD is a bluff, it is our own defense mechanism we run away from.

Follow a trigger through completion.

We are triggered, adrenaline and cortisol are secreted. Loss of fine motor skills, tunnel vision, auditory exclusion, bp, respiration and respiration spike.

Our response happens. We either avoid, deny, try to escape or stay present. After a while, the. neurotransmitters dilute and our body calms down to normal.

That’s correct, nothing has happened to harm us. Our defense mechanism perceived danger, fired to protect us, then receded to a normal state.

We are not damaged. Our defense mechanism works and is ready to protect us in the future.

Then where is the real threat?

It is in our thoughts and fears, a mirage of trauma itself.

Realize nothing happens after a trigger settles down.

That was my dilemma but I ran from every trigger for years until I found a weapon to destroy it.

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