Posts Tagged ‘PTSD’

Updated: Shaila Catherine: . . Emotions And Feelings

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“Noticing change and observing the spaces between feelings can bring a balanced perspective to emotion.
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Emotions are an expression of empty phenomena that arise in response to stimulus, are experienced, and cease.
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The Buddha described a human being as a guesthouse;
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many kinds of feelings come,
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stay for a while,
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and then travel on.
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Try greeting all emotions as visitors or guests.
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Allow them to visit,
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accept that they arise due to conditions,
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but don’t adopt them as permanent residents.”
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Let us practice, play with our emotions, bringing awareness to the correlating body sensation.
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Some strong emotions coupled with a storyline can launch a trauma trigger.
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Get to know your emotions intimately, how they arrive, stay a while, then exit.
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Notice how difficult it is to feel two emotions at once.
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Notice the difficulty trying to experience an opposite emotion.
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Replace anger with joy or vice versa.
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Practice till it is habit and extremely familiar.
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Updated: feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled?


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“The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled. For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.”
— M. SCOTT PECK
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That describes some of my own feelings while integrating, healing, observing fear, crescendo and fade.
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Actually visiting places in real time that were triggers, is uncomfortable, scary, anxious and formidable, but healing happens by facing, going through our delusions not around them.
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We do not run, escape to what we think is safety or trauma grows and thrives inside us.
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Fear grows when we try desperately to escape, flee to safety, race our minds, till we are full of cortisol.
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There is no middle ground with C-PTSD, it grows or we integrate and heal. Doing nothing to heal, trauma becomes stronger with time and influence.
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C-PTSD is a catch-22 for us, we take action or suffer, no middle ground or neutrality exists.
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We are either working, taking action to heal, healed or we continue to suffer more.
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We are the only one who can heal us, from the inside.
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Attitude. Part one, it is important along with a mindful,practice !!!

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Attitude can overcome incredible challenges. The Human spirit can accomplish things we believe impossible. Look at how the mind, willpower can change a life.

“D. Danner and his colleagues studied the longevity of a group of 178 Catholic nuns born in the early twentieth century.
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They lived in the same convent and taught at the same school in Milwaukee.
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Their case is particularly interesting because the outward circumstances of their lives were remarkably similar: the same daily routines, same diet, no tobacco or alcohol, same social and financial status, and, lastly, same access to medical care.
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These factors eliminated many variables caused by environmental conditions.
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The researchers analyzed the autobiographical account that each nun had written before taking her vows.
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Psychologists who knew nothing about these women assessed the positive and negative sentiments expressed in their writings.
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Some had repeatedly mentioned that they were “very happy” or felt “great joy” at the thought of entering monastic life and serving others, while others manifested little or no positive emotion.
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Once the nuns were classified according to the degree of joy and satisfaction expressed in their brief bios, the results were correlated with their longevity.
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It turned out that 90 percent of the nuns placed in the “most happy” quarter of the group were still alive at eighty-five, as opposed to 34 percent of those in the “least happy” quarter.
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An in-depth analysis of their writing allowed the elimination of other fact that might have explained the disparate longevity figures:
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no link was established between the nuns’ longevity and the strength of their faith, the intellectual sophistication of their writing, their hopes for the future, or any other parameter that was considered.
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In a word, it would seem that happy nuns live longer than unhappy nuns. “
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Updated: Self worth can be fixed through affirmations and mindfulness practice!

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“Love yourself first and everything else falls into line. You really have to love yourself to get anything done in this world.”

– Lucille Ball –
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Self worth or unworthiness has to be dealt with before we can seriously consider finding happiness.

Lucille is correct, self love is the first rung on the ladder to happy.

Affirmation will correct this negative situation.

Example:

In this moment right now, I accept all of me.
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A Question from a viewer, Nik, how do I begin, where do I start????

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This post is three years old but just as relevant today.

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Nik, has recently experienced a full blown trigger with a big cortisol shock and panic feelings. Also he inquires how to deplete cortisol and begin healing.
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let me set the stage by describing our attitude towards healing, our practice; No right or wrong, good or bad, judgments or dialogue is involved. Cognitive thought and dissociation are the culprits of strengthening PTSD.
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Print out this simple model, a continuum of inhales, exhales and pauses without any counting, abstract thought or places to get lost. We will address this as a focus skill for the moment, no more no less. Mindfulness brings many connotations and judgments, so we practice this focus skill for now.
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Place your finger on the bottom right corner, starting the inhale, followed by the arched pause, where we hold our breath, before exhaling slowly. Then we pause again before starting a brand new cycle.
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The goal is to train the mind to slow down and let go of thought. The mind wants to go fast, activate the sympathetic nervous system, fill with adrenaline and cortisol, as usual.
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At first keep your eyes open, focusing on the rhythm of the breath as you slow it down. The inhales and exhales are equal, as are the two pauses, a sort of music symphony of the breath.
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Feel the cool inhales, feel the warmer exhales, and balance the body and breath with equal pauses. The inhale sets the pace, speed and duration of the balancing exhale. The first pause after the inhale, is matched by second pause after the exhale, giving the breath a sort of slow melodic feel.
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If a thought emerges, come back to the model, that is it. practice ten minutes twice a day for a week without judgment or goals, except to practice everyday.
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Let us round off the start with “Affirmations” said out loud and recorded everyday. In the shower, driving, working or before bed.
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I strive to accept all of me, the human strengths and frailties, the flawed and exceptional me, as well.
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I strive to accept my current position in life with gratitude, staying present to live fully today.
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I strive to take action in the face of distraction and thought, today!
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good luck, act, give up thinking for a while.
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Healing needs to be specific, concrete and immediate

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Keep your healing plan simple, specific, concrete and in the moment.
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The mind does not respond to abstract goals in the future.

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The mind does respond to specific, concrete and immediate goals.
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Perfect your ability to focus on the breath. (Breathing Track).
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Apply the focus when any trigger thought or distraction engages us.
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Apply when strong emotions invade our consciousness.
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Practice, practice, practice, this is not a spectator sport.
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Action heals, concerted focused action heals, much quicker?
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PTSD risk can be predicted by hormone levels prior to deployment March 8,2017

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Science Blog:
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Up to 20 percent of U.S. veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan developed symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder from trauma experienced during wartime, but new neuroscience research from The University of Texas at Austin suggests some soldiers might have a hormonal predisposition to experience such stress-related disorders.
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Cortisol — the stress hormone — is released as part of the body’s flight-or-fight response to life-threatening emergencies. Seminal research in the 1980s connected abnormal cortisol levels to an increased risk for PTSD, but three decades of subsequent research produced a mixed bag of findings, dampening enthusiasm for the role of cortisol as a primary cause of PTSD.
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However, new findings published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology point to cortisol’s critical role in the emergence of PTSD, but only when levels of testosterone — one of most important of the male sex hormones — are suppressed, researchers said.
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“Recent evidence points to testosterone’s suppression of cortisol activity, and vice versa. It is becoming clear to many researchers that you can’t understand the effects of one without simultaneously monitoring the activity of the other,” said UT Austin professor of psychology Robert Josephs, the first author of the study. “Prior attempts to link PTSD to cortisol may have failed because the powerful effect that testosterone has on the hormonal regulation of stress was not taken into account.”
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UT Austin researchers used hormone data obtained from saliva samples of 120 U.S. soldiers before deployment and tracked their monthly combat experiences in Iraq to examine the effects of traumatic war-zone stressors and PTSD symptoms over time.
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Before deployment, soldiers’ stress responses were tested in a stressful CO2 inhalation challenge. “Healthy stress responses showed a strong cortisol increase in response to the stressor, whereas abnormal stress responses showed a blunted, nonresponsive change in cortisol,” Josephs said.
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The researchers found that soldiers who had an abnormal cortisol response to the CO2 inhalation challenge were more likely to develop PTSD from war-zone stress. However, soldiers who had an elevated testosterone response to the CO2 inhalation challenge were not likely to develop PTSD, regardless of the soldiers’ cortisol response.
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“The means through which hormones contribute to the development of PTSD and other forms of stress-related mental illness are complex,” said Adam Cobb, a UT Austin clinical psychology doctoral candidate and co-author of the study. “Advancement in this area must involve examining how hormones function together, and with other psychobiological systems, in response to ever-changing environmental demands.”
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Knowing this, the scientists suggest future research could investigate the efficacy of preventative interventions targeting those with at-risk profiles of hormone stress reactivity. “We are still analyzing more data from this project, which we hope will reveal additional insights into risk for combat-related stress disorders and ultimately how to prevent them,” said Michael Telch, clinical psychology professor and corresponding author of the study.
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These findings add to a series of published reports from the Texas Combat PTSD Risk Project, a study funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency aimed at identifying biological, psychological and environmental vulnerability factors that predict the emergence of PTSD and other psychological problems among soldiers deployed to Iraq.
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