Posts Tagged ‘PTSD’

The Body Keeps Score: the Visceral Foundation

IMG_0365

 

.
.
However, traumatized people chronically feel unsafe inside their bodies:

.

The past is alive in the form of gnawing interior discomfort.
.
Their bodies are constantly bombarded by visceral warning signs, and, in an attempt to control these processes, they often become expert at ignoring their gut feelings and in numbing awareness of what is played out inside.
.
They learn to hide from their selves.
.
The more people try to push away and ignore internal warning signs, the more likely they are to take over and leave them bewildered, confused, and ashamed.
.
People who cannot comfortably notice what is going on inside become vulnerable to respond to any sensory shift either by shutting down or by going into a panic—they develop a fear of fear itself.
.
We now know that panic symptoms are maintained largely because the individual develops a fear of the bodily sensations associated with panic attacks.
.
The attack may be triggered by something he or she knows is irrational, but fear of the sensations keeps them escalating into a full-body emergency.
.
“Scared stiff” and “frozen in fear” (collapsing and going numb) describe precisely what terror and trauma feel like.
.
They are its visceral foundation.
.

.

 

US veterans’ suicide rates highest in West, rural areas: Benjamin Brown

IMG_1044

.
.
“The Western U.S. and rural areas have the highest rates of suicides among military veterans, according to data released Friday by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
.
The findings examined veterans’ suicides state-by-state, and determined New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and Montana represent the highest rate at 60 per 100,000 individuals – nearly double the national rate of 38.4.
.
Many veterans in those states must drive 70 miles or more to find the nearest VA medical center.
.
Regions in the United Sates outside the West, which had an overall suicide rate of 45.5, were all below the national rate.
.
Kentucky, West Virginia and Oklahoma also had high veteran suicide rates, which can be attributed to greater prescription drug use, particularly opioids. Veterans who received higher doses of opioid painkillers were twice as likely to die by suicide, compared to those who received minimal doses, according to a VA study conducted last year.
.
Gender also played a key role in the most recent VA report. Women veterans had a suicide rate 2.5 times greater than their civilian counterpart, with the risk 19 percent higher among male veterans compared to civilians.
.

.
Older veterans at risk
.

.

.
The majority of military suicides are among elderly veterans, with roughly 65 percent of cases among those 50 or older.
.

.

.
Rajeev Ramchand, an epidemiologist who studies suicide for the Rand Corp., pointed out the significance of the report, which indicated “no state is immune.” He added that social isolation, limited health care access, gun ownership and opioids were likely contributing factors in suicide among veterans.
.
“This requires closer investigation into why suicide rates by veteran status are higher, including the role that opiates play,” Ramchand told the Associated Press.
.
The VA’s latest report breaks down national figures released last year, which determined 20 veterans commit suicide each day, as the agency looks for ways to increase suicide prevention efforts.
.
“These findings are deeply concerning, which is why I made suicide prevention my top clinical priority,” said VA Secretary David Shulkin, reported AP. “This is a national public health issue.”
.
.

Updated: Clarity, doing nothing, letting go

image
.
.
“Leave everything as it is
.
in fundamental simplicity,
.
and clarity will arise by itself.
.
.
Only by doing nothing
.
will you do all
.
there is to be done.”
.
.
—Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche
.
.
.
What fires together, wires together, where we place attention grows, where we withhold withers and dies.
.
Let others own their words, their behavior without input from us.
.
External things, people and situations can not impact our true nature, our spirit, our soul.
.
Tim Robbins in Shawshank Redmeption stated, “There is a place in everyone’s mind that can not be controlled, imprisoned.”
.
.
Sit today and search for that inner, secure place.
.
.

Updated: Shaila Catherine: . . Emotions And Feelings

.

.
.
.
“Noticing change and observing the spaces between feelings can bring a balanced perspective to emotion.
.
.
Emotions are an expression of empty phenomena that arise in response to stimulus, are experienced, and cease.
.
.
The Buddha described a human being as a guesthouse;
.
.
many kinds of feelings come,
.
.
stay for a while,
.
.
and then travel on.
.
.
Try greeting all emotions as visitors or guests.
.
.
Allow them to visit,
.
.
accept that they arise due to conditions,
.
.
but don’t adopt them as permanent residents.”
.
.
.
.
.
Let us practice, play with our emotions, bringing awareness to the correlating body sensation.
.
.
Some strong emotions coupled with a storyline can launch a trauma trigger.
.
.
Get to know your emotions intimately, how they arrive, stay a while, then exit.
.
.
Notice how difficult it is to feel two emotions at once.
.
.
Notice the difficulty trying to experience an opposite emotion.
.
.
Replace anger with joy or vice versa.
.
.
Practice till it is habit and extremely familiar.
.
.
.

Updated: feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled?


.
.
“The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled. For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.”
— M. SCOTT PECK
.
.
.
That describes some of my own feelings while integrating, healing, observing fear, crescendo and fade.
.
Actually visiting places in real time that were triggers, is uncomfortable, scary, anxious and formidable, but healing happens by facing, going through our delusions not around them.
.
We do not run, escape to what we think is safety or trauma grows and thrives inside us.
.
Fear grows when we try desperately to escape, flee to safety, race our minds, till we are full of cortisol.
.
There is no middle ground with C-PTSD, it grows or we integrate and heal. Doing nothing to heal, trauma becomes stronger with time and influence.
.
C-PTSD is a catch-22 for us, we take action or suffer, no middle ground or neutrality exists.
.
We are either working, taking action to heal, healed or we continue to suffer more.
.
We are the only one who can heal us, from the inside.
.
.
.

Attitude. Part one, it is important along with a mindful,practice !!!

IMG_3017.JPG
.
Attitude can overcome incredible challenges. The Human spirit can accomplish things we believe impossible. Look at how the mind, willpower can change a life.

“D. Danner and his colleagues studied the longevity of a group of 178 Catholic nuns born in the early twentieth century.
.
They lived in the same convent and taught at the same school in Milwaukee.
.
Their case is particularly interesting because the outward circumstances of their lives were remarkably similar: the same daily routines, same diet, no tobacco or alcohol, same social and financial status, and, lastly, same access to medical care.
.
These factors eliminated many variables caused by environmental conditions.
.
The researchers analyzed the autobiographical account that each nun had written before taking her vows.
.
Psychologists who knew nothing about these women assessed the positive and negative sentiments expressed in their writings.
.
Some had repeatedly mentioned that they were “very happy” or felt “great joy” at the thought of entering monastic life and serving others, while others manifested little or no positive emotion.
.
Once the nuns were classified according to the degree of joy and satisfaction expressed in their brief bios, the results were correlated with their longevity.
.
It turned out that 90 percent of the nuns placed in the “most happy” quarter of the group were still alive at eighty-five, as opposed to 34 percent of those in the “least happy” quarter.
.
An in-depth analysis of their writing allowed the elimination of other fact that might have explained the disparate longevity figures:
.
no link was established between the nuns’ longevity and the strength of their faith, the intellectual sophistication of their writing, their hopes for the future, or any other parameter that was considered.
.
In a word, it would seem that happy nuns live longer than unhappy nuns. “
.
.
.
.

Updated: Self worth can be fixed through affirmations and mindfulness practice!

IMG_3057.JPG
.
.
.
“Love yourself first and everything else falls into line. You really have to love yourself to get anything done in this world.”

– Lucille Ball –
.
.
.
Self worth or unworthiness has to be dealt with before we can seriously consider finding happiness.

Lucille is correct, self love is the first rung on the ladder to happy.

Affirmation will correct this negative situation.

Example:

In this moment right now, I accept all of me.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: