Posts Tagged ‘MINDFULNESS’

Ricard: pleasure and happiness part 2

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“In brief, there is no direct relationship between pleasure and happiness.
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This distinction does not suggest that we mustn’t seek out pleasurable sensations.
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There is no reason to deprive ourselves of the enjoyment of a magnificent landscape, of swimming in the sea, or of the scent of a rose.
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Pleasures become obstacles only when they upset the mind’s equilibrium and lead to an obsession with gratification or an aversion to anything that thwarts them.
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Although intrinsically different from happiness, pleasure is not its enemy.
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It all depends on how it is experienced.
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If it is tainted with grasping and impedes inner freedom, giving rise to avidity and dependence, it is an obstacle to happiness.
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On the other hand, if it is experienced in the present moment, in a state of inner peace and freedom, pleasure adorns happiness without overshadowing it.”

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Ricard: pleasure and happiness

Steep coastal cliffs

Freeimages.co.uk
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“Unlike pleasure, genuine flourishing may be influenced by circumstance, but it isn’t dependent on it.
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It does not mutate into its opposite but endures and grows with experience.
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It imparts a sense of fulfillment that in time becomes second nature.
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Authentic happiness is not linked to an activity; it is a state of being, a profound emotional balance struck by a subtle understanding of how the mind functions.
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While ordinary pleasures are produced by contact with pleasant objects and end when that contact is broken, sukha—lasting well-being—is felt so long as we remain in harmony with our inner nature.
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One intrinsic aspect of it is selflessness, which radiates from within rather than focusing on the self.
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One who is at peace with herself will contribute spontaneously to establishing peace within her family, her neighborhood, and, circumstances permitting, society at large.”
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Matthew Ricard: HAPPINESS AND PLEASURE: THE GREAT MIX-UP

Thick tangle of mangrove roots

Freeimages.co.uk
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The most common error is to confuse pleasure for happiness.
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Pleasure, says the Hindu proverb, “is only the shadow of happiness.”
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It is the direct result of pleasurable sensual, esthetic, or intellectual stimuli.
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The fleeting experience of pleasure is dependent upon circumstance, on a specific location or moment in time.
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It is unstable by nature, and the sensation it evokes soon becomes neutral or even unpleasant.
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Likewise, when repeated it may grow insipid or even lead to disgust; savoring a delicious meal is a source of genuine pleasure, but we are indifferent to it once we’ve had our fill and would get sick of it if we continued eating.
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It is the same thing with a nice wood fire: coming in from the cold, it is pure pleasure to warm ourselves by it, but we soon have to move away if we don’t want to burn ourselves.
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Pleasure is exhausted by usage, like a candle consuming itself.
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It is almost always linked to an activity and naturally leads to boredom by dint of being repeated.
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Acceptance

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Langurs, India
Photograph by Stefano Unterthiner, National Geographic
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Acceptance of what has happened
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is the first step to overcoming
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the consequences of any misfortune.
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William James
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Always hold fast to the present

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Denali National Park
Photograph by Brian Montalbo, Your Shot
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“Always hold fast to the present.
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Every situation,
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indeed every moment,
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is of infinite value,
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for it is the representative
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of a whole eternity.”
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~Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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Happiness

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“Happiness is your nature.
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It is not wrong to desire it.
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What is wrong is seeking it
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outside when it is inside.”
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– Ramana Maharshi
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Osho

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If you clean the floor with love,
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you have given the world
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an invisible painting.”
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– Osho
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