Posts Tagged ‘Judgment’

Look in the mirror—-say to yourself “——————”

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“Do no Harm”

 

Never say anything negative about yourself,

 

Never entertain an unworthy thought

 

Let doubt and worry go, lessen their impact on your life.

 

Always practice your daily affirmations!

 

In this moment, right now, I approve of me.

 

I accept all of me, the good and not so good,

 

my strengths and weaknesses,

 

my Triumphs and losses.

 

In this moment, right now,  I am completely worthy.

 

 

Merry Christmas
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Can you take a step back, can you observe the thinker, the “Angry” you!!!!!

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Can you focus when you become angry?

 

Can you take a step back and observe the one who is angry?

 

You will observe our creation, our “Ego”, feeling unworthy or mistreated.

 

Who craves approval?   Same answer “Ego”.

 


The one who needs to think is different from the one who observes.


When I focus intently, letting thought go, an impartial observer, a faithful guide appears for me.

 

This observer does not judge or use any words.

 


He/She uses intuition and gut feelings.

 


He/She does not judge or think, but exists in focused awareness of our environment.

 

 

Some call this our soul, or spirit, or intuitive guide, or expansive right hemisphere.

 

 

Introduce yourself, this observer is our only conduit to happiness!

 


That thinker will not lead you to happiness.
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The first time I felt worthy and at peace was ?


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The first time I felt worthy, at peace was meditating. Oh it took time to build strong focus, being able to let the noise pass on through.

 


Then one day, thought ceased, my mind cleared while focused intently on my breath. It was spacious, expansive and full of some kind of energy.

 

 

My trauma anxiety had receded. That fear and anxious hypervigilance was gone. I was so excited the first time it happened, it broke my concentration and brought me back to consciousness.

 

 

I had found an oasis of opportunity and calm. It was a brief encounter, the first time I had experience being whole, worthy, complete.

 


It took me two years of practice, trying different approaches to discover my worthiness, just sitting quietly following the breath.

 

 

This practice was an internal exploration, dependent on nothing or no one external.
Desire is lost during practice. If I could not be content, free and calm sitting quietly, alone, how could a mate, a fancy car, a yacht, mansion or power bring me happiness.

 

 

Desire for approval melted away when I meditated. This was huge for me.

 

 

My compassion center opened up, gratitude proliferated, and giving regained importance.

 


Thinking seems to be self-centered for me, while meditating is a selfless activity. I tried to be an observer of life, not a narrator.

 

 


My conclusion: If we can not find peace sitting quietly with our mind, how will we heal?

 


How will we find freedom or peace?
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My “Ego” is UPSET WITH YOU !!!!!!!

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This is part of the journey, exploring our inner world. We sit quietly, focusing on the breath, letting thoughts fade.

 

 

The “Ego” fades as our cognitive hemisphere (left side) quiets, then we enter our creative (egoless) right hemisphere.

 

 

We can observe our “Ego” from a distance, see it’s desire for approval, feel its anxiety dealing with criticism from another “Ego”.

 

 


After a while we can separate our “Ego” while we are cognitively engaged. We observe the one who thinks and judges.

 


The other day someone criticized a comment I made online about trauma. How dare them, this voice shouted from inside.

 

 

My “Ego” was insulted, angry, pissed as hell, fuming.

 

 


I took a few breaths and let go.

 


Observing from a distance, I discovered my “Ego” felt wounded and wanted revenge.

 

 

A choice had arrived. Do I follow my “Ego” and attack or do I go below the “Ego” and observe.

 

 


I smiled then laughed out loud, my “Ego” was more an appendage, like an arm or leg, not a vital organ.

 

 

Who cares if my “Ego” is pissed, not me.

 

 


I was not angry but amused, clear-headed and relaxed.

 

 


I had become familiar with my “Ego’s” patterns, desires and needs.

 

 

This male “Ego” was highly competitive, prone to action when criticized. He acted like an adolescent boy when perturbed.

 

 

Know your “Ego’s” desires, ambitions, weaknesses, and manipulative ways
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Buddhism and Western medicine: a good read

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Author:

Alex Lickerman, MD, is a physician and former director of primary care at one of the world’s most prestigious universities, the University of Chicago. He is also a practicing Nichiren Buddhist and leader in the Nichiren Buddhist lay organization, the Soka Gakkai International, USA (SGI-USA).

 

Buddhism and Western medicine would seem an incongruous mixture, but in the hands of Alex Lickerman they meld seamlessly into a recipe for overcoming life’s hardships—indeed, for turning them into advantages. An accomplished physician, Lickerman has no truck for the supernatural, but recognizes that the tenets of Nichiren Buddhism have been honed over centuries to help alleviate life’s inevitable sufferings. The Undefeated Mind is a deeply engaging story of how Lickerman has fused modern medicine with ancient wisdom to heal his patients both physically and psychologically—lessons that apply to all of us.”
–Jerry Coyne, professor of Ecology and Evolution at University of Chicago

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Dissociation: The most read and responded subject

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This post and responses are in the header, Dissociation. This subject is by far the most read and commented topic.
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Dissociation in its most basic description, is leaving this present moment to think about the past or future. It is an unreal practice, action. We create a parallel world, a world filled with treachery for our minds. What we create lacks reality! Dissociation takes us to a place, the past or future where happiness does not exist.

 

Dissociation is the only symptom we need to address. It is the linchpin, the king, the all-powerful symptom, the leader of the pack. Dissociation fuels trauma and all other symptoms. Without the duration of dissociation, the minute by minute consumption of emotional fear, the storyline of PTSD fades, deteriorates and eventually bores us. Hyper vigilance, flashbacks, anxiety and avoidance need dissociation.

 

Dissociation is complex, abstract, confusing and the biggest thief in our lives. It steals the only time we have to be happy. Judgment can devour every hour of the day. Judging me, worthy or unworthy, searching for approval, avoiding disapproval or criticism can dominate our landscape.

 

We become heat seeking missiles for pleasure. Sadness, awkward or suffering is avoided with the many dissociative games. Dissociation can engulf every breath, stir fear until it permeates our being. Dissociation grows with use. Each moment spent away from now harms us.

Complex PTSD, usually childhood abuse, complicates dissociation, our minds have not matured so abuse is mixed with development. Dissociation reaches a deeper level,of dysfunction and entanglement. Parts of our personality get stuck. Mp arts of us fight other parts, we feel conflicted. This is why.

 

Here are some of the complex symptoms of dissociation:

From Coping with Trauma-Related Dissociation:

Complex PTSD consists of six symptom clusters, which also have been described in terms of dissociation of personality. Of course, people who receive this diagnosis often also suffer from other problems as well, and as noted earlier, diagnostic categories may overlap significantly. The symptom clusters are as follows:

Alterations in Regulation of Affect ( Emotion ) and Impulses

Changes in Relationship with others

Somatic Symptoms

Changes in Meaning

Changes in the perception of Self

Changes in Attention and Consciousness

Alterations in regulation of affect(emotion) an impulse:

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The Need to Please: a deep intention to help yourself be happy and free.

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“When you find yourself in the midst of approval seeking, take a breath and remember that your people-pleasing habits 

 

 

arise from a deep intention to help yourself be happy and free. 

 

 

Also let go of any blame or self-judgment for these habitual behaviors and ways of thinking. 

 

 

This can help you heal the wound that led to the difficulty in the first place

 

 

Psychologist Tara Brach, who teaches mindfulness in Washington, DC, says that forgiving yourself and letting go of shame about your coping strategies is essential in healing the core wounds from which the coping strategies arose (2011).”

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