Posts Tagged ‘Judgment’

Uncomfortable, unhappy or unfulfilled

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“The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled.
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For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.”
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— M. SCOTT PECK
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Does this describe the space before we take action and heal.
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PTSD at its strongest, when our fight or flight mechanism explodes with cortisol and adrenaline, is also at its most vulnerable.
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No real danger exists even though real chemicals are secreted.
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It is our own defense mechanism we are afraid of.
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If we can stay present, focused on the breath, trauma will integrate and heal.
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Takes a minimum of 15 minutes a day, everyday to improve.
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A Still Mind

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To a mind
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that is still,
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the whole universe
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surrenders.”
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— Chuang Tzu –
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My two cents:  Being focused, empty of thought is not boring, it is thrilling.

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Our thoughts carry bias and cloud reality.

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Our judgmental perception not reality is where we exist then!

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Everything is created twice

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Iceberg, Greenland
Photograph by James Balog
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“Everything is created twice,
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first in the mind
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and then in reality.”
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~Robin S. Sharma
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Judging wastes life

Concentric clearly defined annual growth rings on a cut tree stump displayed in an arboretum, close up overhead view

Free images.co.uk.

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The fewer judgments we carry, the better chance we have to be happy!
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Most of our judgments are so habitual or subconscious that they go unnoticed.
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Keep a ledger of every judgement you notice.
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Bring awareness to every decision, every emotional comment, every judgment during the day.
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Notice how we judge everything, even the minuscule, the mundane.
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We judge food, traffic, others appearance, our appearance, the weather, emotions, feelings, moods, performance, etc., etc.
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It all consumes time and energy, wasting life.
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What value do these judgments hold?
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Is there importance, permanence to any of them?
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Replace judgment and thought with being present, living in the moment for an awesome change of pace.
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Ricard: Learning to welcome Difficult Emotions

Footpath through dense greenery

Freeimages.co.uk
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“One crucial aspect of working with our emotions is learning to stop viewing them as obstacles to our happiness.
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We almost always judge the emotions that feel bad as bad; we see them as the enemy, as something to be conquered or eradicated.”
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I think our judging happens without thought, as though it is an involuntary reflex, habitually practiced with every external experience.
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We avoid our own body functions, adrenal stress response (fight or flight), difficult emotions, (fear, anxiety, self doubt, anxiety, etc.), pain or unpleasantness.
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Having the ability to experience awkward, unpleasant, or anxious situations without judgment frees us to experience this current moment.
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Go visit an uncomfortable or awkward situation today without reacting, without judging until these emotions subside.
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Let the storyline go and feel the body sensations, intimately, quietly.
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On the surface judging steals our waking time needed to experience happiness, freedom,the present moment, life.
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99% of all judgments impact our chance of being happy negatively.
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Healing, finding happiness is not a birth right, it is earned through daily work.
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Thinking and doing

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Arshile Gorky (Armenia / USA, 1904-1948)
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“The Emotional life of the brain” Richard Davidson:
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“My favorite example of how “mere” thought can change the brain in fundamental ways is an experiment I’ll call the virtual piano study.
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Scientists led by Alvaro Pascual-Leone, of Harvard University, had half a group of volunteers learn a simple five-finger keyboard piece, practicing over and over for a week with their right hand.
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They then thought can change the brain in fundamental ways is an experiment I’ll call the virtual piano study.
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They then used neuroimaging to determine how much of the motor cortex was responsible for moving those fingers, finding that the intense practice had expanded the relevant region.
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That was not too surprising, since other experiments had found that learning specific movements causes such an expansion.
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But the scientists had the other half of their group of volunteers only imagine playing the notes; they did not actually touch the ivories.
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Then the researchers measured whether the motor cortex had noticed.
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It had. The region that controls the fingers of the right hand had expanded in the virtual pianists just as it had in the volunteers who had actually played the piano.
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Thinking, and thinking alone, had increased the amount of space the motor cortex devoted to a specific function.”
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the effects of meditation have shown:

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Joan Miró (Spain, 1893-1983)
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Davidson
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“Let me recap what our studies of long-term meditators as well as the effects of a relatively short course of meditation have shown:
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• Mindfulness-based stress reduction enhances left prefrontal activation; this is a marker of the Fast to Recover end of the Resilience continuum and is associated with greater resilience following a stressful challenge.
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• A more intensive period of mindfulness meditation improves selective attention and reduces the attentional blink, moving people toward the Focused end of the Attention continuum.
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In both cases, mindfulness strengthens prefrontal regulation of brain networks involved in attention, in part by strengthening the connections between the prefrontal cortex and other brain regions that are important for attention.
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• Compassion meditation can nudge you toward the Positive end of the Outlook dimension; it strengthens connections between the prefrontal cortex and other brain regions important for empathy.
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• Compassion meditation also likely facilitates Social Intuition.
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• While you might expect most forms of meditation to nurture Self-Awareness, at least the kind that makes you more attuned to bodily sensations such as heartbeat, we found that neither Tibetan forms of mindfulness meditation nor Kundalini yoga forms of meditation were associated with better performance on a task that measures awareness of one’s heartbeat.”
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