Posts Tagged ‘Inner child’

Essential Secrets of Psychotherapy : The Inner Child Has your adult self spent time with your inner child today?

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Destructive behavior takes various forms: from subtle self-sabotage and self-defeating patterns to passive hostility to severe self-destructive symptoms, violent aggression and, sometimes, evil deeds.

 

Commonly, destructive behavior in adults bears the impetuous, impulsive quality of childish petulance or narcissistic temper tantrums. Or an infantile neediness, dependency, and dread of abandonment. Or an irresponsibility and angry refusal to be an adult: the “Peter Pan syndrome,” or what Jungians refer to as a puer or puella complex.

 

The archetypal Jungian notion of the puer aeternus (male) or (female) puella aeterna–the eternal child–provides the basis for what has come in pop psychology and self-help movements (see, for example, the writings of Dr. Eric Berne, Dr. Alice Miller, or John Bradshaw) to be known as the “inner child.” What exactly is this so-called inner child? Does it truly exist? And why should we care?

 

To begin with, the inner child is real. Not literally. Nor physically. But figuratively, metaphorically real. It is–like complexes in general–a psychological or phenomenological reality, and an extraordinarily powerful one at that.

 

Indeed, most mental disorders and destructive behavior patterns are, as Freud first intimated, more or less related to this unconscious part of ourselves. We were all once children, and still have that child dwelling within us.

 

But most adults are quite unaware of this. And this lack of conscious relatedness to our own inner child is precisely where so many behavioral, emotional and relationship difficulties stem from.

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Deep Secrets and Inner Child Healing

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Diana Raab

Excerpt:

“When putting the finishing touches on my most recent book, Writing for Bliss, I decided to include a section on inner-child healing. 

 

It wasn’t in my original draft, but I noticed that many friends and colleagues inquired about it, reminding me how healing and transformative it would be to write about and access the wounded child.

 

Around the same time, I’d just read Thich Nhat Hanh’s book Reconciliation, where the wise Buddhist said that inside each of us is a young, suffering child; and that to protect ourselves from future suffering, we all try to forget the pain. 

 

Most often, when we feel pain from a deep place within, it’s our inner wounded child who’s calling. Forgetting the pain results in more pain.

 

Writing about this pain can be one way to heal our inner child and help heal any negative emotions we might be holding on to. 

 

Research has shown that the body holds both emotional and physical pain, and even if we try to ignore that pain and forge ahead with our lives, chances are that it will always be there. 

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