Posts Tagged ‘hospitals’

The Mountain of Enlightenment – Transcending Duality and the Ego Self : part one

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As the sensation of a personal self attaches to the body in the earliest themes of awareness, the body then becomes seen as the sole source of all fulfillment through glorifying its sensual pleasures.
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In the most unaware realms it is completely primitive and animalistic in nature in that all others are seen as ‘enemies’ and there is a constant need to protect one’s investments – the body and whatever else it has deemed as valuable or ‘mine’.
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The attraction is to all things passionate and pleasurable to the senses and therefore the ego is completely selfish and impulsive in nature.
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The most basic examples are the desires for food, water, sex, shelter, materialism, and physical domination/power (alpha male/female).
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As a result of this primitive outlook the ego self as the body will then do absolutely anything to maintain control, dominance, and feed its addictions to the passions of the body including addiction to victimization and suffering itself.
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One can most easily think of these levels of awareness as extremely immature human beings that have no possible comprehension of selflessness or love and are striving for narcissistic survival and ego inflation only.
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It is the level of intense and absolute selfishness, greed, addiction, sadism, rage, hate, aggression, self-condemnation, and an overall complete rejection of true lovingness due to not being able to fathom caring for someone else.
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This level of awareness is concordant with sociopaths, psychopathic killers, thieves, serial rapists and killers, megalomaniacs, ‘devil’ worshipers, and all other notions of narcissism.
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Continued
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Technology

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The difference between technology and slavery is that slaves are fully aware that they are not free.
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Nassim Nicholas Taleb
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My two cents: Mindfulness is not a passive experience, but a brilliant awareness of this present mundane moment.
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We get lost in technology, in thought, in judgment and in emotion.
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“In Touch”: Conditioned to try to control how we appear to others. Part two

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There are still subtler and more powerful fears around releasing the chronic inner grip upon ourselves:
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we may lose control, become disoriented, and not know who we are.
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Essentially, it is a fear of the unknown.
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We tend to choose a known suffering over an unknown freedom.
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If I am not a contracted, separate self, what am I?
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What will happen if this tight fist—this inner contraction that relates to my core sense of self—lets go?
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Will I fragment and go insane?
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Will I be able to function in daily life?
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Will I disappear?
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Mindfulness Toolbox: Anxiety

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Clinical anxiety is the most frequently diagnosed mental health condition in the United States.
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There are some 40 million Americans who struggle with an anxiety disorder.
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By momentarily ceasing to construct self-concepts through daily experiences, you simplify and clarify your relationship with all things. .

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http://www.bigfoto.com
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My interpretation: We take our daily experience,

placing different importance on one situation over another,

as we value one person over another,

and construct “I”, a self,

as a reflection of how we fit it or fail to fit in.
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If we were to travel to another planet with alien inhabitants, would this self be pertinent?
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Would We have to construct a new self to fit into a new world.
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Consider we, our true self (soul, spirit) has not changed since birth.
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Play around, experiment with self, emotions, their relationships and interactions.
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Why not use the “Ego” as a servant, assisting in our pursuit of happiness.
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NPR part three::: I avoid at all costs going to a hospital,,

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In fact, the hospital brings in so much money that all of this wage garnishment turns out to be a minor item on its balance sheet. Totaling up all the money the hospital seized from patients’ wages last year, according to court records, shows that wage garnishment brought in just half of 1 percent of its revenues.

Other hospitals in Missouri have found ways to avoid suing low-income patients. BJC Healthcare, a nonprofit, operates a chain of 12 hospitals, including Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, the largest in the state. In 2013, the BJC hospital chain filed just 26 lawsuits. Unlike Heartland, BJC automatically slices 25 percent off its standard rates for uninsured patients and never includes interest on payment plans, said June Fowler, BJC’s spokeswoman.

By comparison, Heartland hospital’s debt collection arm filed over 2,200 lawsuits in Missouri courts in 2013. “It’s not fair to those who are paying to not be aggressive with those who have the ability and aren’t paying,” Wagner says.

She says the hospital does everything it can to fulfill its mission as a nonprofit, charitable institution. Patients are offered multiple opportunities to qualify for financial assistance and avoid the possibility of legal action, she says. It would be better for everyone, Wagner says, “if we attempt to work on things before it gets to this level.”

In recent years, the hospital has made its charity care policy more generous. Heartland’s policies state that anyone making less than three times the poverty line can qualify to be billed at a reduced rate, similar to what an insurance company pays, and then get that amount cut in half. If they make less than twice the poverty line, the entire bill is forgiven.

The hospital makes every effort to let patients know that they may qualify for help, Wagner says. “Financial counselors are available if a patient asks for that.” But if patients don’t utilize those resources, she says, the hospital must take action.

“No one goes into this with the goal or the desire to ruin someone’s life,” Wagner says. “But at the same time, the services were rendered, and we have to figure out how to get them paid for.”

Asked why the hospital sues more patients than any other in the state, Wagner said, “I don’t know.”

Last year, about 8,700 Heartland patients had their bills cut or zeroed out, according to data provided by Heartland. About half of those were uninsured, while the rest were spared full payment of deductibles or other obligations not covered by their insurance.

But uninsured patients like the Heries who don’t receive charity care — either because they were turned down or never applied — are billed at Heartland’s standard rates, the sticker price that insurers never pay. In 2013, more than two-thirds of the accounts the hospital’s debt collection division handled involved uninsured patients, according to data provided by Heartland.
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NPR: … .When Nonprofit Hospitals Sue Their Poorest Patients

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On the eastern edge of St. Joseph, Mo., lies the small city’s only hospital, a landmark of modern brick and glass buildings. Everyone in town knows Heartland Regional Medical Center — many residents gave birth to their children here. Many rush here when they get hurt or sick.

And there’s another reason everyone knows this place: Thousands of people around St. Joseph have been sued by the hospital and had their wages seized to pay for medical bills. Some of them, given their income, could have qualified to get their bill forgiven entirely — but the hospital seized their wages anyway.

Nonprofit hospitals get huge tax breaks — they are considered charities and therefore don’t pay federal or state income tax or local property tax. In exchange, they are obligated to provide financial assistance or “charity care” to lower-income patients.

Some nonprofit hospitals around the country don’t ever seize their patients’ wages. Some do so only in very rare cases. But others sue hundreds of patients every year. Heartland, which is in the process of changing its name to Mosaic Life Care, seizes more money from patients than any other hospital in Missouri. From 2009 through 2013, the hospital’s debt collection arm garnished the wages of about 6,000 people, according to a ProPublica analysis of state court data.

After the hospital wins a judgment against a former patient in court, it’s entitled to take a hefty portion of the patient’s paychecks going forward: 25 percent of after-tax pay. For patients who are the head of household, if they tell the hospital or court that information, the hospital can seize only 10 percent of each paycheck.

But Heartland, through the debt collection company Northwest Financial Services, often sues both adults in a household — garnishing one at the 10 percent rate and the other at the full 25 percent of their pay. The hospital also charges patients 9 percent interest, the maximum allowed under state law.
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