Posts Tagged ‘healing’

Opioid lawsuit targets rich family behind drug that fueled US crisis Sackler family, which owns Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, accused of fueling addiction while boosting profits

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The Guardian:
Joanna Walters and agencies
Tue 12 Jun 2018

 

The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.
The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.

 

The state of Massachusetts on Tuesday sued the maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, which has been blamed for spawning America’s opioids crisis, naming leading executives and members of the multibillionaire Sackler family that owns the pharmaceutical company.

The lawsuit accuses the company, Purdue Pharma, of spinning a “web of illegal deceit” to fuel the deadly drug abuse crisis while boosting profits.

Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died
Maura Healey, state attorney general
Purdue Pharma is already defending lawsuits from several states and local governments, but Massachusetts is the first state to take the unusual step of personally naming the company’s executives in a complaint, the state attorney general, Maura Healey, said. It names 16 current and former executives and board members, including the chief executive, Craig Landau, and eight members across three generations of the Sackler family that wholly owns Purdue.

The lawsuit alleges Purdue deceived patients and doctors about the risks of opioids, pushed prescribers to keep patients on the drugs longer and aggressively targeted vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and veterans.

“Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died,” Healey said on Tuesday.

Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, issued a statement saying it vigorously denied all the allegations and looked forward to presenting “substantial defenses” to the claims in the lawsuit.

“We share the attorney general’s concern about the opioid crisis. We are disappointed, however, that in the midst of good faith negotiations with many states, the commonwealth [of Massachusetts] has decided to pursue a costly and protracted litigation process. We will continue to work collaboratively with the states toward bringing meaningful solutions,” it stated.

Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.
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Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.

 

Purdue, along with some other painkiller makers and drug distributors, is currently facing more than 300 lawsuits from city and county authorities across the country. The lawsuits have been corralled into one multi-district case in a federal court in Ohio. The judge in that case has been pushing for a huge, quick settlement to compensate victims and assist in what the government has admitted is a public health crisis, in the way the so-called “Big Tobacco settlement” happened against cigarette companies in the 1990s. But some experts are calling for the case to go to trial in order to oblige the pharmaceutical companies to produce more evidence in the discovery process.

 

 

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Why do people staring at me impact my life so negatively?

 

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I share this with a feeling of extreme embarrassment.

 

 

It seems so mundane, so ridiculous on paper, but in real life, it is my invisible prison.

 

 

Why does this seem to have such a negative influence, such an enormous power, such a quick, catastrophizing affect.

 

 

A childhood filled with constant criticism, extreme physical violence and harsh abuse, lives just beneath the surface of my consciousness.

 

 

I was a thing to my father, like the owner of a fighting pit bull. My worth was how good I made him look playing sports.

 

 

I had a big nose as a kid, which made me a target for ridicule, shame and unwanted attention.

 

 

Add this experience to my fathers abuse and my trauma manifests as social anxiety.

 

 

These two situations dominated my childhood, nowhere was I safe.

 

 

Catastrophic loss seems possible for me, when it explodes.

 

 

My C-PTSD came from this sick childhood.

 

 

Cognitively, I know all of this is irrational, transparent and impossible.

 

 

Knowing does not eliminate hypervigilance, anxiety, fear or shame!

 

 

They run on their own without conscious influence or control.

 

 

If I spend time thinking about any of this, it grows.

 

 

My job is to Meditate, slow the mind, focus it, and then let all these judgments and thoughts pass on by.

 

 

The most I have to fear is my own reaction to this stimuli.

 

 

No matter what, living fully and happily is my goal, not isolation or hiding for safety.

 

 

Thoughts? I have decided to share my journey in more detail as ptsd resurfaces in my life.
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Living in the Now: First post by Mechelle

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This is Mechelle with Renewing Winds renewingwindsblog. I started following Marty and his blog about two years ago.  He is a mindfulness coach and dear friend, who asked me to collaborate  on this blog.

I have applied many of his principles and would like to share my perspective with you all.  My student perspective allows one to see the challenges and benefits of doing the work.  Applying his lessons, I have absolutely transformed my life and feel quite blessed to be able to share my journey with you all.

I also started my own blog.  I want to help people become their authentic-self and unlock their true potential.  I am hoping to offer you all insight to my path that has allowed me to thrive after being suicidal for many years.

Living in the now and staying present has been a difficult  for me to achieve.  I tend to overthink and create a story, one that leads to fear and anxiety.

Marty says to live in the now is to be an observer of our senses.  This means to bring awareness to not only sight, sound, smell, taste, but also to the sensations in the body.

How does a thought make you feel?  Bringing awareness to these sensations may bring you closer to attuning to your authentic-self.

Acknowledging and accepting feelings, guides me to discover a self, the self that is connected to intuition and offers endless love and compassion.

I cannot always pay attention to my surroundings and be aware of the moment.  Since I am naturally driven to distraction  by mind chatter, it proves difficult to sometimes limit thoughts.  When I find myself deep within my mind, I try paying attention to how this is triggering sensations throughout my body.  For me, I realized that negative sensations are usually traced back to a rat wheel of endless worry.

As I attune to my feelings, I let the trigger, which causes pain in the pit of my stomach, to be a warning signal.  Not always am I able to clear thoughts, once the negative voice has began.  I first become aware of the warning signal, then I am able to make a rational decision to change my behavior instead of mindlessly reacting.

In times when I am unable to clear my mind and bring my awareness back to my senses, I use gratitude and affirmations to reprogram my sub-consciousness.  I have previously brainstormed and made it somewhat ritualistic to incorporate these concepts in my life.

When a trigger is revealed, I can then use an affirmation that brings my awareness to the now  “In this moment, right now I am safe, I am worthy and I accept all of me.”  This helps me gain a perspective that is both calming, nurturing and attuned to the present.

Ideally, we would be able to clear our minds in all circumstances and enjoy life as it unfolds before our eyes.  Being aware is a skill that needs to be practiced.  This is why mediation is so vitally important to overall health and wellness.  Through sitting, we train our brains to be calm and collected.

When thoughts do arise, try continuously to bring them around to clarity by focusing on the  breathing track.  This takes us out of a reactionary mind to one of acceptance and feeling of overall peace.

In the practice of focusing on the breath, one will eventually be able to correlate it back to the senses. This correlation allows you to realize the breeze brushing against your cheek, the song in a chipmunk’s chatter and the innocence in a scared, frantic, and angry person.  Once this correlation is made, my hope for you all is to transform a monotonous zombie-like life into one of a revived, exciting and blissful one.

The adrenal stress response mechanism…

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The fight, flight or freeze mechanism:
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Tunnel Vision: One’s field of vision narrows and tunnels into the perceived threat.
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Auditory Exclusion: The hearing tends to shut off.
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Loss of fine motor skills: Often only gross motor functions are possible under the adrenal state.

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Tai-chi-Psyche: Everything seems to move in slow motion.
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Increased heart rate, blood pressure and respiration.
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This is the environment PTSD places us when we are triggered. Our skills have deteriorated along with our ability to respond to a delusion threat. This is why we have a daily practice, so we can stay present and observe this phenomena correctly.
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PTSD is a bluff, it has access to this switch (adrenal stress response) but nothing exists beyond the this threat.
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After a trigger subsides, no damage can be discerned. Our defense mechanism fired,
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the effects of meditation have shown:

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Joan Miró (Spain, 1893-1983)
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Davidson
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“Let me recap what our studies of long-term meditators as well as the effects of a relatively short course of meditation have shown:
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• Mindfulness-based stress reduction enhances left prefrontal activation; this is a marker of the Fast to Recover end of the Resilience continuum and is associated with greater resilience following a stressful challenge.
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• A more intensive period of mindfulness meditation improves selective attention and reduces the attentional blink, moving people toward the Focused end of the Attention continuum.
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In both cases, mindfulness strengthens prefrontal regulation of brain networks involved in attention, in part by strengthening the connections between the prefrontal cortex and other brain regions that are important for attention.
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• Compassion meditation can nudge you toward the Positive end of the Outlook dimension; it strengthens connections between the prefrontal cortex and other brain regions important for empathy.
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• Compassion meditation also likely facilitates Social Intuition.
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• While you might expect most forms of meditation to nurture Self-Awareness, at least the kind that makes you more attuned to bodily sensations such as heartbeat, we found that neither Tibetan forms of mindfulness meditation nor Kundalini yoga forms of meditation were associated with better performance on a task that measures awareness of one’s heartbeat.”
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Life isn’t about getting and having, .

  
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“Life isn’t about getting and having,
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it’s about giving and being.”
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–Kevin Kruse-
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When unfulfilled desire steals opportunity, suffering ensues.
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Desire and need must wane for growth and healing to begin.
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Acceptance, total acceptance of us and our current situation is the prerequisite for growth and happiness.
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Some of our day needs to be spent with the mind going slow, empty of thought, immersed in this present moment.
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My mindfulness group starts to improve before my Eyes!

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(Start at bottom right at the dot, then trace upward with the inhale for 3 seconds,,then pause for 2 seconds, then exhale for 3 seconds,,closing with a 2 second pause, 10 second breaths)
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Kelly from group writes:
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“Marty i am here to tell you. Sitting with your breath is so sweet and simply that at the start i thought you were nuts. but i was desperate to change. I followed thru and i am here to tell you. I am doing things i never thought i would do. I am sleeping but. I was driving down the freeway and not having a panic attack. My agoraphobia is improving and i am feeling freedom. I feel this inner peace i never thought possible. some days i think oh my i need to hurry do something and get that panic feeling. Then i stop and say no that is your ego. You need to breath. Thank you so very much for teaching me how to save my life and the future of my children.”
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Kelly is one of two in the mindfulness group, who has experienced this improvement in a month. I thought this impossible.
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The girls have reached empty at an accelerated rate.
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Why?
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The difference: Both have been taught to use the breathing track, instead of counting their breaths. First with eyes open, physically tracing the model as we breathe, feeling the breath curve around the transitions.
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It is a symphony of sorts, a melody of balance that soothes our nerve endings.
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All the abstract has been eliminated, counting ceased, goals vacated, we focus and follow our breath on the model.
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The only other ingredient is sound, hearing. They have been taught to seek out the lowest decibel sound in the room, then to venture underneath, slowing the breath.
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The goal is to be able to hear the sound of the inhale.
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Kelly and Mechelle have learned to let go, let thought fade and thus empty the mind, incredibly quick.
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When the mind is focused and empty, present in this moment, our organism repairs itself and then the mind expands. Our organism balances mind and body and thrives in this space.
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Things we thought impossible are completed without effort at times.
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Another experienced meditator in the group, Tom, mentioned that it took him two years to reach where the girls have reached in a month. It is not only my observation but his also.
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I have witnessed the greatest results from desperate people, needing to change, going to take action in some direction.
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Healing seems to happen when desperation brings action.
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