Posts Tagged ‘Happy’

Being Awake (Awakened): “Ten Thousand Things” by Robert Salzman:

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Whenever I think about it (being awakened) or notice it, I find myself here.

When I say “here,”

I mean at the visual center of an apparent world of sights;

at the auditory center of an apparent world of sounds;

at the tactile center of an apparent world of texture, etc.

The entirety of that sensory information, most of which usually passes unnoticed, is assembled moment by moment into an experience of “the world.”

I cannot do that assembling any more than I can digest food or circulate blood.

I have no choice in the matter.

When I awaken from sleep, the world is there, a seamless confection that is not my doing.

Nor do I know what that world “really” is or from whence my experience of it comes.

Inasmuch as I neither make the world nor, despite the dogmas of religion and spirituality, know anything at all about its source, I do not know and cannot know what “I”—a feature of that world—am either.

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My two cents: That “I” feature is the “Ego” we create.

Seems it separates us from being awakened.

Not my words!

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Shaila Catherine: Tracking our Emotions, coming and going

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“How long does an emotion last?

Have you ever felt that you were angry for a couple of hours or sad all day long?

Look closely at that angry feeling or that sad feeling.

Notice the story: the thoughts of loss that triggered sadness, the threat that triggered anger.

Do such thoughts remain static or are they intermittent, or cyclical?

Notice sensations in the body: perhaps heaviness in the chest, an ache in the stomach, an indistinct disoriented sensation, heat or cold, a hollow feeling.

Are these sensations lasting, stable, or fluctuating? Do they increase or decrease?

Notice the intensity of the anger or sadness: does it remain stable,

or come as waves that intensify when triggered by certain thoughts, smells, or sights and then diminish when attention is distracted by exercise, meals, and conversation?”

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My two cents: Chronic Pain also has a fluctuating pattern.

The more attention we donate to pain or emotion, the more the intensity increases.

Hug the positive ones, let the negative ones flow on through.

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Leave your front door and your back door open.

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“Leave your front door and your back door open.

Let thoughts come and go. Just don’t serve them tea.”

~Shunryu Suzuki

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My two cents: We have a choice, let our minds continually fill with thoughts or carve out some time when we are focused and empty of thought.

Remember these thoughts carry emotions and moods with them.

Please discount all but your directed thoughts then explore the emotions attached from a distance.

We do not give up thought or emotion, we just explore how they arrive and the impact they have on our happiness.

For me this has a two fold purpose, first my happier moments are absent of thought and emotion and second when my mind is in crisis, I can focus, let go and escape my minds dysfunction.

Next time worry, doubt, resentment, jealousy, or anger grabs you, take a breath, feel the body sensation, then let go.

Remember front door and back door are open.

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We can only manage to smile when things go our way.

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Living Dhamma by Ajahn Chah

We may know of these things, but we don’t really know if we don’t know within our own minds.

Buddhism doesn’t enter our heart.

If our mind is good and virtuous, it is happy.

There’s a smile in our heart.

But most of us can hardly find time to smile, can we?

We can only manage to smile when things go our way.

Most people’s happiness depends on having things go to their liking.

They have to have everybody in the world say only pleasant things.

Is that how you find happiness?

Is it possible to have everybody in the world say only pleasant things?

If that’s how it is, when will you ever find happiness?

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Emotions have signals

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EKMAN: Thank you very much for asking me to define emotions. (Laughs.) As you might expect, I have written about this, proposing that there are a number of characteristics that distinguish emotions from other mental states.

One is that most emotions have a signal. That is, they let others know what’s happening inside us, unlike thoughts, for which there is not a distinctive signal for the various thoughts people have.

You do not know whether I just thought about my mother, who has been dead for more than fifty years, or what I am thinking now.

When people find out that I study facial expression, they often get very uncomfortable, saying, “You are reading my mind.” I say,

“No, I can only read your emotions.” I cannot tell from the signal what caused the emotion.

If I see a fear expression, I know that you perceive a threat.

But the fear of being disbelieved looks just like the fear of being caught.

Recognizing that is important in police work. If a suspect looks afraid, that does not tell you that he or she committed the crime. Maybe, but maybe not. That was Othello’s error.

He thought his wife Desdemona’s look of fear was the fear of a woman caught in infidelity. But it was a wife’s fear of her jealous husband, who had just killed someone he thought was her lover:

She should have been afraid.

Emotions have a signal—this is one characteristic—unlike thoughts, unlike ideas. But there are exceptions.

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Is Happiness a Choice?

https://pixabay.com/users/RyanMcGuire-123690/.

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Surely, I am no expert however choices we make either give us an opportunity to be happy, sad, bored, or miserable in my opinion.

If I decide to entertain negative, unworthy thoughts happiness has no chance of entering my life.

If I decide to be angry, feel sorry for myself, or engage in risky behavior, happiness will never visit.

Happiness needs a healthy, balanced, worthy ego to blossom.

Happiness is a balance for me. Yes, stressors, worries and fears still exist out there, my reaction has changed.

At times I can let the noise go. Knowing this moment, mundane, uneventful, still contains everything in life, let’s me enjoy, “NOW”.

Learning to enjoy this present moment (NOW) entirely without thought or judgment, opens up a new world.

Happiness is not out there, it is inside us, our perception and behavior to stimulus decides our fate.

It is not intellectual, you live this experience, not read about it or take a class.

Words can not describe this experience.

Takes daily practice to reach a certain level of focus that opens this space.

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Happiness and Time: a different look

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Man created the clock, being late, showing up early, the past and the future. None of these times can help you experience happiness.

Happiness only exists in one time frame, now, the present moment, not in the past and surely not in the future.

Remembering a past event can bring a joyful moment, any more time and energy spent, robs us of this moment.

Predicting future happiness is a thought, nothing real and definitely not accurate. Even if this prediction comes true, that joy is fleeting.

What we can achieve can be lost, all impermanent possessions change meaning and worth with time.

That promotion may bring resentment and jealousy from your peers. Protecting your title may bring worry and stress.

If you accept that happiness (wellbeing) only inhabits this present moment, how will you adjust your behavior, your thoughts or actions?

All that seeking for external ways to find happiness seem misguided.

Happiness is not an emotion, not something we can achieve or accomplish with actions, it is an internal way of being, of living in the moment.

If we hunt for happiness, it will always be a stranger .

If we can be happy without needing to change or achieve a thing, will you stop seeking happiness out there.

If you are searching, try exploring your inner world, it is the core of happiness.

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