Posts Tagged ‘Happy’

Updated:Focused and Fearless: Relinquishment; The path of release!!!!!

a bed of golden, red and maroon coloured autumn fallen leaves

a bed of golden, red and maroon coloured autumn fallen leaves

Pics from http://www.freeimages.co.uk/linktous.htm
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“Let go of every fixation.
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Ultimately this is a path of release.
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The mind may attempt to construct itself on any foundation:
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through attachment to blissful jhanic states;
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by becoming “the one who lets go”;
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by being “the meditator who understands change.”
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Observe and laugh at the antics of the mind.
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Coax it to release its hold, even its attachment to good things.
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Uproot any place you find yourself stuck in, whether it be with the pleasures of the tranquil mind of jhana or in the clarity of insight.
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Resist the urge to keep score of your insights.
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Assessing your meditation practice only fuels grasping.
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Willingness to let go is indispensable.
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Every stage of this path requires a complete relinquishment of both the struggles and the delights, pleasant experiences and painful ones.
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Even the states of samadhi that you diligently cultivate must, in the end, be relinquished.
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Happy is located where?

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“I am happy in the present moment.
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I do not ask for anything else.
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I do not expect any additional happiness or conditions that will bring about more happiness.
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The most important practice is aimlessness, not running after things, not grasping.”
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– Thich Nhat Hanh
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my two cents:

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Maybe we should rethink our concept of happiness.
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Seems like fulfilling desires does not lead to happiness but suffering or addiction.
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Practicing aimlessness is the opposite of how we Americans live.
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We can have goals but must return from the future to live in this moment, content!
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Being content with ourselves and our position in life opens up this moment, the only time happiness is available.
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Updated: Self worth can be fixed through affirmations and mindfulness practice!

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“Love yourself first and everything else falls into line. You really have to love yourself to get anything done in this world.”

– Lucille Ball –
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Self worth or unworthiness has to be dealt with before we can seriously consider finding happiness.

Lucille is correct, self love is the first rung on the ladder to happy.

Affirmation will correct this negative situation.

Example:

In this moment right now, I accept all of me.
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Updated: Imagine how you would feel if the affirmation were absolutely true in your present reality. .

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“First, you need to do more than say the words.
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Remember I mentioned that the subconscious learns the most from emotion?
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That’s why you need to feel the words.
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Imagine how you would feel if the affirmation were absolutely true in your present reality.
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Allow yourself to physically feel this emotion.
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When it comes to manifesting something into the physical world using affirmations, it helps to close your eyes and visualize with strong images.
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In fact, any sensory input you can garner will help–smells, tastes, sounds and textures.
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In doing so, you activate the parts of the brain that experience that reality.
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The connections made in the brain when you have that experience become strengthened. .
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Your brain is literally making it a habit to have that experience.
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The deeper and longer you feel, the greater and faster your results.”
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Sounds like visualization.
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The Trap of Self-Improvement

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In the healing work of self-compassion, it’s important to avoid the trap of getting caught up in self-improvement.
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When you have a pervasive sense of unworthiness, this can be tricky.
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The identity of unworthiness is formed of self-blame and a deluge of self-judgments offered by an inner critic who wants nothing to do with self-compassion.
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It’s far more interested in masochistic endeavors like self-improvement projects that it’s never satisfied with.
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But this just gets you more stuck in feeling deficient for several reasons, the foremost being the very idea that there’s a faulty and unworthy self that needs to be improved.
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As discussed, Buddhist psychology asserts that the very concept of a static and enduring self is the most profound of delusions and the source of endless suffering.
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Believing that you can fix the unworthy self just leaves you trapped in the never-ending pursuit of being “good enough” through better workshops, new therapies, or a better diet or exercise program.
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In many ways it’s no different from always striving for more money or more things.
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It’s just another variation on eternally wanting something more or better.
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The Undefeated Mind: pain

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Frosted Tamarack Swamp
Photograph by Adam Dorn

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Though the pain of a stubbed toe or a headache may seem like a single, unified experience, it actually represents the sum of two different experiences created by two separate areas of the brain—one called the posterior insula, which registers the sensation of pain (its quality, intensity, and so on) and the other the anterior cingulate cortex, which registers pain’s unpleasant character.
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We know this is how the brain experiences pain because of imaging studies and because patients who’ve had damage to the anterior cingulate cortex feel the sensation of pain but not its unpleasantness.
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That is, they feel pain but aren’t bothered by it (interestingly, in some people, morphine has the same effect.
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When the anterior cingulate cortex isn’t functioning, pain is still experienced but seems to lose its emotional impact and thus its motivating force.
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This finding, that the sensation of pain and the unpleasantness of pain come from distinct neurological processes that occur in different locations within the brain, explains how a single pain stimulus can cause such subjectively different pain experiences.
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Even if the physical sensation of pain remains constant, our “affective reaction” to it—how much it makes us suffer—will vary tremendously depending on several factors.
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Research shows, for example, that how we interpret the meaning of pain has a dramatic impact on our ability to tolerate it.
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In one study, subjects reported pain they believed represented tissue damage to be more intense than pain they believed didn’t, possibly explaining why women rate cancer pain as more unpleasant than labor pain even when their intensities are the same.
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Not only that, but when we focus on the benefit of pain (when one exists), we’re actually able to reduce its unpleasantness.
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Our Mind

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Your own mind is originally as pure and empty as the sky.
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To know whether or not this is true,
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look inside your own mind.
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PADMASAMBHAVA
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