Posts Tagged ‘Happy’

“Ego” and Awareness


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Awareness does not involve our “Ego”.


Our “Ego” is never equal to another “Ego” and craves approval. That means criticism is avoided, denied or excused away.

 

Awareness through the “Ego’s” vision is very biased and highly inaccurate.

 

Awareness arrives when we go below the “Ego”, below all thought and emotion.
It happens when we get quiet, focus, and observe.

 

Awareness enables observation, seeing without judging.

 

This is our first step towards healing or happiness.


Our memories can be described as incomplete and inaccurate.


Memory, well trauma memory is stored in brief packets. We fill  the spaces in between.  These memories are collected when our fight or flight mechanism has hampered judgment.  

 

Survival from an imminent threat shuts down parts of the mind and stores this memory in a different part of the brain, the right amygdala.

 

In criminal trials eye witness has proved to be inaccurate unless you know the person.  Watch an old movie you viewed five years ago. See how memory is different from that movie.


Be aware of the prejudice, the childish “Ego” holds tightly.

 

 

Free yourself from the bias, see life clearly, become aware.
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What is our Responsibility?

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Is our happiness separate,  isolated from those around us?

 

Can one be happy when surrounded by suffering?

 

Do we have a responsibility to give to others?

 

Is our happiness indirectly tied to giving?

 

I think we must choose our way of supporting others, then take action.

 

What do you think?

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Happiness: An Irresistible Pursuit from “The Undefeated Mind”

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We actually have as little choice about wanting to become happy as the heart does about pumping blood. We’re incapable of wanting not to become happy. The pursuit of happiness isn’t merely an inalienable right with which we’re endowed or an activity we’re capable of choosing; it’s psychological law we must obey.

 


Even people who appear to want nothing to do with happiness, like those so immersed in self-hatred that their principle aim becomes self-sabotage, will say they haven’t lost their desire for happiness so much as ceased to believe they deserve it.

 

Similarly, people suffering from severe depression who seek their own destruction typically do so only to escape the pain they’re feeling, not because they no longer want to be happy.

 

 

They may no longer believe they can be happy and therefore stop behaving as if they want to be, but that’s because depression often leads to a state of learned helplessness (once convinced that happiness is no longer possible, continuing to take action toward it becomes next to impossible).

 


Just as the heart’s function continues to be the pumping of blood even when it starts to fail, our minds aim toward happiness even when they appear to stop seeking it or even wanting it.

 

 

Whether we want this to be true or even realize it is makes no difference. Like the heart, our minds are built a certain way to perform a certain function we can’t change, one that by virtue of our sentience and self-awareness we just happen to be able to perceive.

 


But if happiness is indeed our primary function, why is it so difficult to achieve?

 

 

Perhaps for at least two reasons. First, because merely desiring happiness more than anything else doesn’t itself teach us how to achieve it.

 

 

And as we’re all capable of believing things without evidence, many of our beliefs about what makes us happy will simply turn out to be wrong. How many of us, for example, consider happiness to lie in the unmitigated pursuit of pleasure?

 

 

Certainly pleasure plays an important role in contributing to happiness, but to appreciate how an existence can be overflowing with pleasure and still be miserable we only need look at people for whom certain pleasures (sex, gambling, drugs, and so on) send all other considerations spinning off into the distance and often cause the collapse of the very lives they delight.

 

 

Further, too much pleasure can be paradoxically unpleasant (a few jelly beans are delicious, but too many make us sick), something happiness, by definition, can never be.

 

some small, simple things bring BIG CHANGES

 

I pay attention when I am herding cats.

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Bring awareness to the way you approach life, a situation, a person, a chore, an obstacle, a challenge and feel the enormous change.

 

Can you enter a task absent of judgment? Can you listen intently to someone, focused on them rather than preparing your response.

 

Can you slow down your mind. Maybe you can focus on your breath intently and let the mind empty of thought.

 

The mind wants to go fast and handle complex thought, abstract creations or outrageous fantasies.

 


The mind responds best to simple, immediate, concrete ideas or tasks.

 

The mind functions best going slow, empty of thought, open to whatever exists in front of you.

 


The mind has much greater opportunity to find happy moments when it is going slow, empty of thought.

 

The mind never experiences happiness when it is in the past or future. It is like life being wasted if we spend all our time there.

 

If you’re hungry you find a grocery or restaurant, if you’re looking to be happy, you stay present and let the noise pass on through.

 


Shop for happiness today.

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extraordinary moments

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“I don’t have to chase extraordinary moments to find happiness.

 

It’s right in front of me if I’m paying attention and practicing gratitude.”

 

– Brené Brown –
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My two cents: Buddha or the Dalai Llama would add that the external world does not change if we become enlightened, awakened, happy or more aware.

 

If we find happiness on the mountain top, we brought it with us.


Happiness is an internal way of living and giving, my opinion.
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What does your mind gravitate towards when thinking about your life?

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Does your judgment highlight the failures, losses or focus on the successes. Is it pessimistic or optimistic? Does it look far into your past or stay fairly current.

 


Take stock of what you place value on, what you see leading to happiness.

 

 

Do you focus on the external or internal condition for your inquiry?

 

 

External conditions are out of our control, inside the circle of concern, wasteful category.

 

 

Does approval, affection, attention and affirmation influence your judgments, feelings and emotions?

 

Approval can be revoked or changed at any time.

 

 

Awareness comes first to any change.

 

 

Again take stock, bring awareness to your daily patterns of thought.

 

 

Awareness, awareness, awareness!!!
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The ratio of positive to negative emotions

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“Losada line”:

“The ratio of positive to negative emotions that fosters flourishing, learning, optimism, and even overcoming various negative physiological factors that accompany negative emotions, is effectively 2.93, or three positive emotions for every negative one.”
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My two cents: This article speaks about the importance of micromoments, or opportunities for happiness.

 


Therefore our gratitude practice needs to live moment to moment, merged with keen awareness moment to moment.

 


Also, we need to limit the duration of negative emotions. If we are sad, anxious, resentful, jealous, angry or depressed, happiness is impossible.

 


Now, we can see happiness is about awareness of micromoments, a focused path of acceptance and giving.

 

 

In a way we trade those negative emotions by letting them fade, followed by focus on this present moment or small micromoment without judgment.

 


It seems a simple equation but very difficult to live everyday.
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