Posts Tagged ‘Happy’

The ratio of positive to negative emotions

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“Losada line”:

“The ratio of positive to negative emotions that fosters flourishing, learning, optimism, and even overcoming various negative physiological factors that accompany negative emotions, is effectively 2.93, or three positive emotions for every negative one.”
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My two cents: This article speaks about the importance of micromoments, or opportunities for happiness.

 


Therefore our gratitude practice needs to live moment to moment, merged with keen awareness moment to moment.

 


Also, we need to limit the duration of negative emotions. If we are sad, anxious, resentful, jealous, angry or depressed, happiness is impossible.

 


Now, we can see happiness is about awareness of micromoments, a focused path of acceptance and giving.

 

 

In a way we trade those negative emotions by letting them fade, followed by focus on this present moment or small micromoment without judgment.

 


It seems a simple equation but very difficult to live everyday.
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Opioid lawsuit targets rich family behind drug that fueled US crisis Sackler family, which owns Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, accused of fueling addiction while boosting profits

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The Guardian:
Joanna Walters and agencies
Tue 12 Jun 2018

 

The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.
The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.

 

The state of Massachusetts on Tuesday sued the maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, which has been blamed for spawning America’s opioids crisis, naming leading executives and members of the multibillionaire Sackler family that owns the pharmaceutical company.

The lawsuit accuses the company, Purdue Pharma, of spinning a “web of illegal deceit” to fuel the deadly drug abuse crisis while boosting profits.

Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died
Maura Healey, state attorney general
Purdue Pharma is already defending lawsuits from several states and local governments, but Massachusetts is the first state to take the unusual step of personally naming the company’s executives in a complaint, the state attorney general, Maura Healey, said. It names 16 current and former executives and board members, including the chief executive, Craig Landau, and eight members across three generations of the Sackler family that wholly owns Purdue.

The lawsuit alleges Purdue deceived patients and doctors about the risks of opioids, pushed prescribers to keep patients on the drugs longer and aggressively targeted vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and veterans.

“Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died,” Healey said on Tuesday.

Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, issued a statement saying it vigorously denied all the allegations and looked forward to presenting “substantial defenses” to the claims in the lawsuit.

“We share the attorney general’s concern about the opioid crisis. We are disappointed, however, that in the midst of good faith negotiations with many states, the commonwealth [of Massachusetts] has decided to pursue a costly and protracted litigation process. We will continue to work collaboratively with the states toward bringing meaningful solutions,” it stated.

Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.
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Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.

 

Purdue, along with some other painkiller makers and drug distributors, is currently facing more than 300 lawsuits from city and county authorities across the country. The lawsuits have been corralled into one multi-district case in a federal court in Ohio. The judge in that case has been pushing for a huge, quick settlement to compensate victims and assist in what the government has admitted is a public health crisis, in the way the so-called “Big Tobacco settlement” happened against cigarette companies in the 1990s. But some experts are calling for the case to go to trial in order to oblige the pharmaceutical companies to produce more evidence in the discovery process.

 

 

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I did not think my PTSD would return.

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I did not think my PTSD would return.

 

I also, did not think I could heal, could feel inner peace, could be worthy, but I did.

 

 

Then a prescribed blood pressure med, or more accurately its side effect, ignited my nervous system and old triggers.

 

 

I did not think my mind would dissociate so easily without constant awareness.

 

My judgments of healing and mindfulness dreamed of a euphoric life, of few negative thoughts, fewer unworthy images and an easy, happy existence.

 

In reality, my life has changed dramatically but the adversity and daily challenges test my centeredness and calm.

 

It truly is a journey, a journey with daily choices.

 

I could be sad, could be depressed at times. My meditation practice gives me a choice, be present, neutral and calm or suffer.

 

 

I still have worry and doubt at times. Worry creeps in stealthily, unbeknownst to me at first, then I catch  negative emotions arriving.

 

I feel loss at times, then know it is a judgment, air unless I give it power.

 

Gratitude, humility and giving are the tools I use to counter my “Ego’s” need for control.

 

 

I did not think it would be so challenging, so hard, so harsh after so much work.

 

My abusive childhood, my violent, critical upbringing, has left deep ruts in my subconscious.

 

 

At least now, my “Ego” sits in the back seat of my car.

 

It is not perfect but no one said it would be.

 

I am grateful I have tools to make good choices.
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A viewer asks: What does this practice entail and what is the ultimate benefit?

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This practice entails a simple, concrete, immediate, and passionate focus on our breath, a repetitive learned skill, a safe way of training the mind.

 

 

It is a very simple, very powerful, mundane looking, daily practice. We need to invest a minimum 20 minutes a day of calm but intense focus practice.

 

 

It is a repetitive practice that builds focus starting with the mastery of one breath. It starts slow and has no time-table or goals.

 

 

I recommend working on one breath, then pause and evaluate. If you start trying to Meditate for ten minute or longer, you will get lost in thought and become frustrated.

 

 

Meditation unfolds best at its own pace without our judgments or bias. No goals, let your journey be thought free, give it a chance to blossom, trust it fully.

 

 

The whole practice is based on one breath, a reason so many overlook simple as weak.

 

 

This practice entails the simplest, easiest and quickest way to heal disorders, to find calm, peace of mind and eventually happiness.

 

 

It is an internal investigation of discovery into our nervous system and inner world.

 

 

We become friends first with our nervous system, as the breath activates our parasympathetic nervous system, the brakes, slowing our mind to focus and be at its most powerful.

 

 

We are most powerful, most capable of extraordinary accomplishment, true happiness or access to our joyful emotions when the mind is empty and totally present.

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Updated: Mindfulness: A Simple Outline!!!!


Frank Glick took this photo at Fort Snelling National Cemetery. When he recorded the shot, he never could have guessed how much it was going to mean to the widow of the World War II veteran buried there. — Star Tribune
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Each step fulfilled leads to the next step. Healing or happiness does not arrive from a calm, a mellow straight line path. Rather, it is a path with set backs, turmoil and stress.

 

 

It is a path inhabited with intense terror, enormous anxiety and fear of the unknown.

 

 

It is an infinitely simple path, visually, a mundane looking innocent exercise. It unfolds like this:

 

 

Awareness (Paying attention, Finding ourselves lost in thought then coming back to now)

 

 

Mindfulness (daily focus  on the breath,  No goals, no doubts, no worries)

 

 

Acceptance (ok with uncomfortable, awkward, letting go of thought and judgment)

 

 

Surrender (no resistance, heart is a butterfly net, catch your fears with your net)

 

 

Gratitude (desires in perspective,  we have what we need, look for ways to give others)

 

 

Giving (In a loving kindness way, no reward needed, do not write a check, see and talk to those you help)

 

 

Freedom (Life expands, the ego has faded for a moment, take calculated risks with a smile)

 

 

Happiness (the mind empties, life deepens, expands, opportunity is unlimited)

 

 

More happiness hopefully.
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Trauma Memories are sensory fragments

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“The amygdala stores the visual images of trauma as sensory fragments,

 

which means the trauma memory is not stored like a story,

 

but by how our five senses

 

were experiencing the trauma

 

at the time it was occurring.

 

The memories are stored

 

through fragments of visual images,

 

smells, sounds, tastes, or touch.”
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My two cents: I always searched for the narrative, the cognitive story that would unlocked my total healing. Instead, a sensory trigger that associates with a stored fragmented sense ( sight, sound, smell, touch, taste) is the culprit.

 

We add the story to complete that fragmented visual, or smell, sound, taste or touch into our trauma narrative.   Fabrication comes to mind.

 

Fear does not contain fear inside itself. Our narrative adds the fear. Our emotions seem to add weight or have a larger impact to our thoughts.  When we get angry thoughts gain massive power.

 

Our trauma is not this big monster, the long suffering novel I have carried for decades,  but a fragmented sensual remembrance.
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Happy and the “Ego”. Almost strangers

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First, understand the “Ego” (left side)  is never equal to another “Ego” (human being).
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He/she is superior or inferior, or somewhere in between, here in lies the crux of suffering for us.
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Now, let us explore where they spend their days.
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The “Ego” spends most of its time in the past, searching the memory banks to compare us with him/her, then project its emotional judgment for the future.
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Happy on the other hand is 100% steeped in this moment, not a smidgen of happy lives in the past or future.
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So, it seems the ”ego” is in a different time zone than happy.
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This is why Happy and the “Ego” are strangers in the night.
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Adjust your attention and time spent in the here and now.
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