Posts Tagged ‘happiness’

The Inner Critic is not your friend!

Pixabay: Devanath

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Complex PTSD: From Surviving to Thriving:

“Permanent abandonment, public humiliation, lethal illness, lonely death, imminent attack, and penniless homelessness are common endangerment themes of many survivors.

One of my clients identified his inner critic endangerment process as: “My critic, the horror movie producer”. This made me think: “My critic the terrorist”.

If I had to describe the two most key processes of the critic, I would say this.

First, the critic is above all a self-perpetuating process of extreme negative noticing.

Second the critic is a constant hypervigilance that sees disaster hovering in the next moment about to launch into a full-court-press.”

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My two cents: Our inner critic became dominant during our childhood abuse, know our goal is to overthrow this tyrant, this despot of suffering.

We must decide to support the inner critic or Aware Presence.

Ruminate or stay present, suffer or live free.

It is a moment to moment battle, the marathon of life.

The secret is to focus on this moment, then move on to the next moment without baggage!

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Pick a mood or refrain for reality

Pixabay: kordi_vahle

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“Good moods are as fragile as eggs…..and bad moods as fragile as bricks”

David Mitchell

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My two cents: We can let moods ebb and flow without much attention.

I would rather be present, not thinking about this mood or that mood, it is so trivial, and will change with the wind.

I am so much deeper than any such shallow thing as a mood.

Why waste life on a mood?

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Observing the Thinker

Pixabay

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Aware Presence, I used to describe this as our true self, is the observer of our mind and body.

Our mind and body changes with age, our Aware Presence stays exactly the same.

Aware Presence only exists in the present moment and is not part of the body or mind.

That means we have no memory of our Aware Presence. The thinker has subsided when our Aware Presence comes forward.

Remember we can observe our thoughts and the thinker.

Our Aware Presence observes this Thinker.

Each time we meditate, our goal is to hook up with this Aware Presence.

Start today, meditate for five focused minutes. Start small and enjoy the journey.

No matter what we carry in our memory banks, the amount of worry we have stressed about or the trauma that haunts us, it has no impact on our Aware Presence.

Let thought go, release guilt and shame, try to be present, without thought.

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Aware Presence part two, 2

Ferrari Enzo That Was Split in Half in PCH Crash Sells for $1.76 Million

Wrecked at 201 mph both driver and passenger walked away unharmed

Full story here: https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/news/a27944/crashed-and-rebuilt-ferrari-enzo-still-expected-to-sell-for-2-million/

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From “The Art of Peace and Happiness”

“If someone were to ask us to turn our attention towards a sensation in the body, a thought or image in the mind or an object in the world, we would have no difficulty, just as we have no difficulty in turning our attention towards these words.

But what if someone were to ask us to turn it towards our self, towards the aware Presence that knows the objects of the body, mind and world?

Try to do that. For instance, try to turn your attention towards whatever it is that is seeing these words.

Some of us may be inclined to turn our attention towards a sensation around the eyes or head, but notice that the eyes and the head are themselves sensations of which we are aware.

Try again to turn your attention towards whatever it is that is aware of these sensations, and is not itself a sensation.

In which direction do we turn? Notice that any direction in which we turn is always towards some kind of an object, more or less subtle.

If we take our attention away from that object and try to turn it towards whatever it is that knows or experiences that object, we are always frustrated.

Every direction turns out to be the wrong one.

It is like standing up and trying to take a step towards one’s own body; every step is in the wrong direction. And yet, at the same time, no step takes us farther away.”

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Aware Presence part one, 1,

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From “The Art of Peace and Happiness”

For a mind that has become accustomed for so many years to knowing only objects–that is, to focusing its attention and interests on the body, mind and world alone–it is inevitable that the desire to know oneself as some kind of a subtle object will persist.

We will search for this aware Presence and try to make it an object of our knowledge or experience.

However, if we return again and again to the experiential understanding that our self is the knower or witness of all objects, it becomes clear that it cannot itself be an object.

It is our simple experience that our self is present and aware but has no objective qualities.

As this experiential understanding deepens, so the attempt to search for our self as an object decreases correspondingly.

But the inability to know our self as an object does not mean that our self cannot be known.

It simply means that it cannot be known in the way that an object is usually known, that is, through the subject–object relationship.

Our true self is known in a more intimate and direct way, simply through being.

In fact, we discover that the only way to know our self is to be our self and not to mistake our self for any kind of an object.

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My two cents: The author details that this “Aware Presence” is not contained in the mind or body.

It is the observer of the mind and body.

It is not limited by the mind or body.

It has unlimited ability. 😎

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A world class Meditator faces capture and torture

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Matthew Ricard from the book “Happiness”

After the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1959, Tenzin Choedrak, the personal physician of the Dalai Lama, was first sent to a forced labor camp in northeastern Tibet along with some one hundred others.

Five prisoners, himself among them, survived.

He was transferred from camp to camp for nearly twenty years and often thought that he would die of hunger or of the abuse inflicted on him.

A psychiatrist who specializes in post-traumatic stress and who treated Doctor Choedrak was astonished that he showed not the least sign of post-traumatic stress syndrome.

He was not bitter, felt no resentment, displayed serene kindness, and had none of the usual psychological problems, such as anxiety, nightmares, and so on.

Choedrak acknowledged that he occasionally felt hatred for his torturers, but that he always returned to the practice of meditation on inner peace and compassion.

That was what sustained his desire to go on living and ultimately saved him.

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My two cents: This meditator did not get PTSD, did not become hyper vigilant, or contemplate suicide.

We do not know what thoughts (demons) any man faces but these world class meditators live life fully.

Suicide is extremely rare or non existent for these world class meditators.

In my mind, a focused meditator will not commit suicide unless there is a severe disorder or a traumatic brain injury.

“He occasionally felt hatred for his torturers, but that he always returned to the practice of meditation on inner peace and compassion.”

We let those hateful, harmful, suicide thoughts pass on through.

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Taking action: the PTSD road that is less travelled

Pixabay: Tama66

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What has to happen for you to take action.

Why is change so Hard?

Why will we suffer in our current situation then refuse to change, take action?

I have no answer or justification for mans refusal to try to be happy or maybe just find peace of mind.

I have asked therapists, trainers, observed people on PTSD discussion boards and concluded around 5% try after a month.

Why is change so hard?

I do not believe there is a simple answer.

Takes courage, willpower, daily consistency, the correct skills and some intangibles.

Every situation is different but look how few people heal.

PTSD is epidemic, 20 vets have committed suicide daily for last three years, and the civilian population is in crisis.

Complex PTSD takes even longer to heal and the available couches are limited.

With our current system, what percentage of sufferers actually have access to therapy?

In my mindfulness group and on blogs you can see the need, see how many are suffering.

Why do we avoid trying to get better then live a damaged life?

Any insight or suggestions.

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