Posts Tagged ‘happiness’

Making the Complex:….. Simple

Pixabay: truthseeker08

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Meditating/Mindfulness still carries this mystical connotation, somehow extremely complex, needing a monk like figure in a cave for decades to reach its destination.

This paradigm fits the journey of a Zen Buddhist monk searching for enlightenment or awakening.

For us meditation can start with one breath.

Master one breath, focus on the inhale, then move to a pause, followed by a slow exhale, then complete the breath cycle with a final pause.

Meditation is nothing more than assembling a few of these focused breaths together.

This process is extremely simple, our “Egos” resistance is extremely energetic.

If we can let all the judgments go, then work on a few breaths, the practice thrives.

For me meditating involves focus on the breath, combined with intense listening and visual observation.

I try to hear my inhales and exhales along with my heartbeat.

The quieter my body becomes, the more my system calms, the greater the benefits we enjoy.

In the visual arena with my eyes closed, I focus on what appears. For me I do not get a light show or colors, but I see a a sparsely lit pattern of dark.

If you use incense, smell can be a fourth sense to engulf our focus.

Our senses are ever present and have no connection to thought, we complicate life with our added judgments.

The “Ego” looks shallow and weak resisting focus on one breath.

Healing takes doing, action makes changes, small actions start the journey.

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A viewer shares his challenges with meditating

Pixabay: S. Hermann & F. Richter

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Rudid96

“I don’t formally meditate. There, I’ve said it. Sometimes I think I’d like to but my actions speak otherwise. I listen to meditation Apps., read about it’s benefits and yet, when it comes to actually sitting for 20 minutes it doesn’t happen. The closest I get to meditation is while solo hiking or biking. “Why?” I’ve asked myself? Todays post left me with a vague awareness. I’m afraid. Afraid of the silence, the stillness. The constancy of my footsteps while hiking allows my mind to wander in safety. Doesn’t make sense.

What could be safer than sitting in silence for 20 minutes? Tell that to my body.”

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My two cents: Accept that trying to change our minds of always thinking, always judging, always in the past or future is awkward and difficult.

Awareness always happens first. Now you know the resistance and it is your Ego wanting to keep control.

Solo hiking and biking can be a meditative experience.

Instead of twenty minutes of meditation, try three to ten breaths.

Start small, no pressure. No right or wrong, good or bad, let judgment be.

My meditation practice deepened when I used my breathing track model. Know the breath has four parts, inhale, pause, exhale, pause.

Slow and quiet the mind, slow the breath, listen for the sounds of your inhales and exhales.

When emotions arrive let the story go, focus on the body sensations. Observe them with an easy curiosity.

Relax and enjoy the journey.

We could FaceTime and I can walk you through it.

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Is Happiness a Choice?

https://pixabay.com/users/RyanMcGuire-123690/.

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Surely, I am no expert however choices we make either give us an opportunity to be happy, sad, bored, or miserable in my opinion.

If I decide to entertain negative, unworthy thoughts happiness has no chance of entering my life.

If I decide to be angry, feel sorry for myself, or engage in risky behavior, happiness will never visit.

Happiness needs a healthy, balanced, worthy ego to blossom.

Happiness is a balance for me. Yes, stressors, worries and fears still exist out there, my reaction has changed.

At times I can let the noise go. Knowing this moment, mundane, uneventful, still contains everything in life, let’s me enjoy, “NOW”.

Learning to enjoy this present moment (NOW) entirely without thought or judgment, opens up a new world.

Happiness is not out there, it is inside us, our perception and behavior to stimulus decides our fate.

It is not intellectual, you live this experience, not read about it or take a class.

Words can not describe this experience.

Takes daily practice to reach a certain level of focus that opens this space.

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Happiness and Time: a different look

https://pixabay.com/users/jarmoluk-143740/

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Man created the clock, being late, showing up early, the past and the future. None of these times can help you experience happiness.

Happiness only exists in one time frame, now, the present moment, not in the past and surely not in the future.

Remembering a past event can bring a joyful moment, any more time and energy spent, robs us of this moment.

Predicting future happiness is a thought, nothing real and definitely not accurate. Even if this prediction comes true, that joy is fleeting.

What we can achieve can be lost, all impermanent possessions change meaning and worth with time.

That promotion may bring resentment and jealousy from your peers. Protecting your title may bring worry and stress.

If you accept that happiness (wellbeing) only inhabits this present moment, how will you adjust your behavior, your thoughts or actions?

All that seeking for external ways to find happiness seem misguided.

Happiness is not an emotion, not something we can achieve or accomplish with actions, it is an internal way of being, of living in the moment.

If we hunt for happiness, it will always be a stranger .

If we can be happy without needing to change or achieve a thing, will you stop seeking happiness out there.

If you are searching, try exploring your inner world, it is the core of happiness.

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Positive Thinking

https://pixabay.com/users/ShonEjai-1075665/

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“Excerpt from The Way Within”

“Positive thinking makes changes to the ‘me’, but the ‘me’ is an illusion. ‘Me’ is just an old story you have been telling the world about who you are.”

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My two cents: We reframe negative thoughts about I, me, mine to positive thoughts about I, me, mine.

Meditation/Mindfulness prefers to be present without needing positive thoughts about “I” to be happy.

A mindfulness practice does not require positive thoughts as a crutch.

The happiest monks waste little time cultivating positive thoughts to find happiness.

Their time is focused on being present, aware and content.

Happiness is not found in thought.

Do you believe this?

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I, me, mine: Can you refrain from using them this week?

https://pixabay.com/users/johnhain-352999/

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We create an identity, a collection of how others see us, treat us, combined with how we see ourselves, blended together into an “Ego” (I, me, mine).

The problem with this created “Ego” is he/she never feels equal to another “Ego”.

Example: Two millionaires or billionaires Trump and Bloomberg trade adolescent barbs. One insults the other calling him short, while the other responds with your hair is ridiculous and your fat.

Men of great power and status succumb to the their “Egos” desire to rule others.

Our “Ego” has the disposition of an adolescent when challenged by another “Ego”.

We struggle while placating our own “Egos” childish desires.

Most “Egos” are similar to a peacock, wanting to display those beautiful feathers in public at every opportunity.

In a Mindfulness/Meditation practice, we try to calm our “Ego” back into the minor role it was created for, identity.

Our “Ego” is the culprit when we feel disrespected, angry, resentful, jealous, superior or unworthy.

These are sentiments that lead to suffering.

Does your “Ego” enhance life or bring unworthiness and drama?

Can you resist using I, me , mine today or a week?

See how often you use I, me, mine in a day.

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Can we influence Desire!

https://pixabay.com/users/geralt-9301/

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Witnessing peoples desires, puzzles me.

The desire to heal rarely matches the desire to do the daily work.

Human nature explains that but suffering is the result.

In my opinion less than 5% commit to daily action.

The question becomes, are you one of the 5%?

What is different about these doers?

What can you do to join these ranks?

Any suggestions or comments.

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