Posts Tagged ‘happiness’

Gratitude has helped me

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Cultivating gratitude has worked wonders for my attitude.

Others compliment me for seeing things, situations in a positive light now. That still feels a little strange.

That is an amazing transformation from a world class worrier (me) seen through a prism of gratitude. Things were not safe or alright in my childhood and bad things did happen.

Yes, I lived through a violent, critical abusive childhood. I also had the tools to heal and live a happy life.

Many others had harsher, harder childhoods. I was grateful for my skills and opportunities others did not have.

Gratitude let’s me see others suffering. Meditation has opened my compassion center, which in turn started me giving to others.

I never feel sorry for myself any more, I let that feeling pass on by.

I started this blog to help others improve, then I approached organizations to open a real mindfulness group.

This was an impossible task a year earlier. My PTSD brought depression, social anxiety and agoraphobia. I could not leave my house for six months.

I guess my gratitude was stronger than my social anxiety. The experience of sharing others journey in group, helping them improve has made a profound impact on my life.

Worry still tries to creep in, bringing fear of what may happen.

Healing is not a happy ever after type of deal, it is a day to day experience.

We can heal and live today full out.

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Letting go of your identification with the dream character: Beyond Mindfulness

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“Letting go of your identification with the dream character and returning to your true home as the unconditional openness of awakened awareness has a powerful impact on your life at every level.

Suddenly the burden of a lifetime has fallen from your shoulders, the dense filters of conditioning have dropped from your eyes, and you experience life with a new freshness, vividness, and clarity.

Each moment has intrinsic meaning and value because it shines with the light of awakened awareness, and a subtle, quiet joy becomes your constant companion.

Indeed, you realize that happiness is not something you need to earn or that comes and goes capriciously, according to circumstance—it’s your natural state, which the conditioning of a lifetime has heretofore hidden from view.”

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Meditation: Getting to know the dream you inhabit: Beyond Mindfulness

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In the next week, pay special attention to the dream you’re constantly weaving about yourself.

Make it an object of your investigation, as you would a mystery you’re trying to solve.

Notice the stories you tell yourself about other people in your life and how they figure into your narrative.

Who are the villains, and who are the heroes?

Do you tend to make yourself right and other people wrong?

Or do you beat yourself up for all the mistakes you believe you’re making?

Notice the feeling tone of the dream—the anger, the fear, the hurt, the shame.

What are the recurring themes and issues?

Where did you learn to see life in this way?

Notice that sometimes the stories seem to recede into the background and loosen their grip.

How do you feel then?

What happened to the stories?

Remember that the stories you tell yourself about reality generally have very little to do with what’s actually going on.

They’re interpretations, projections onto the blank screen of possibility, which then have a powerful effect on what actually happens.

What would it be like to live free of your stories?

How would you feel?

What would your life be like?

Becoming intimately familiar with the dream you inhabit can be a first step in freeing yourself from it.

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perceiving the interior of our body, the subtleties

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“Interoception is the skill of perceiving the interior of our body, we draw upon the sensations of our muscles,

the signals from our heart and intestines.”

We slow the breath, soothing the nervous system, calming our interior. With each breath we slow and focus more intently.

We notice our body sensations, the more powerful ones first, then the more subtler ones as our breathing builds focus.

We notice the expanding of our lungs, the pause, then the exhale without judgment.

Next we focus on the heart, slowing its beat with every breath.

We listen for the sounds of our inhales, exhales and heartbeat.

This is the point where we sense the small, mini reactions of our body.

The often overlooked mini reactions of our internal world, the twitches, the knots, the tingling or tightness go unnoticed.

Anxiety, worry doubt and fear manifest in the body this way.

Certain thoughts and emotions manifest in small body sensations.

Our job is to explore these manifestations, then accept them.

Many times we feel numb and ignore these signals.

We take our breath to each of these mini reactions and hang out.

Bring a curious mind to the inner world.

Get to know where you manifest thoughts and emotions.

Knowing our inner world intimately allows us to connect with the outer world in healthy ways.

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In The Mindful Therapist, Daniel Siegel writes: Interoception

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“Interoception is the skill of perceiving the interior of our body.

As we… focus a spotlight of attention on this internal world of our bodily states,

we draw upon the sensations of our muscles,

the signals from our heart and intestines,

the overall feeling inside of ourselves.

Interoception is a crucial aspect of the monitoring function of the mind

that opens the gateway to attunement with others.”

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Adapt your Affirmation to fit your needs

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In this moment, right now, I accept all of me, my successes and my mistakes, the good and the not so good, and the kind, giving me at my core.

These words resonate for me. Adapt your affirmation with ones that reverberate for you.

I used to say, I accept all of me. That does not resonate like this new one. Accepting my mistakes is the specific word for me.

Abstract (accepting all of me) does not have the impact of specific, emotional descriptions (Mistakes, losses, embarrassment, jealousy, resentment, etc).

What bothers you?

What do you need to accept?

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Why Meditate? Matthew Ricard: A dedication

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May the positive energy created not only by this meditation

but by all our words, deeds and thoughts ——- past, present and future———

help relieve suffering of beings now and in the future.

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