Posts Tagged ‘Gratitude’

Giving


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Where do I start?


Giving without regard for reward has many benefits.

 

Giving this way, opens up our compassion center.

 

Gratitude will grow when you help others, a great side effect.

 

Life looks and feels different when giving takes over.

 

If you need a purpose, none better than giving.

 

Gratitude and giving change us, transforms us, offers us the space where wellbeing and happiness live.

 

Besides my family, giving is the most precious possession I have.


That awareness has developed with daily meditation and practice.

 

Besides being a possession, giving is a boomerang.


Throw giving around and watch what comes back.

 

Even smiles and kind words have enormous power.
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These 6 EASY Buddhist Practices Will Instantly Change Your Life By Matt Caron

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1) Consume Mindfully

Be thankful for the nourishment good food provides, and be aware of what you put into your body. Think about it before you buy it. Is it really something you need, or just a transient desire? Pay attention to the effects of negative media you consume. Ask yourself: is it helping you to grow or learn, or is it a form of distraction? Does it take away from your mindfulness, and is it even worth it to do so?

These are really important small decisions that impact us more than we realize.

 

2) Take a Moment

Your words have an impact on your life and others. You should ask yourself if your words foster love or bring harm. This is so important. Let your mind settle before you start work, school, or walking into your home. This will set a different tone that can make all the difference. Listen to the people you encounter. If we talk to others and listen, we create the possibility of mutual sympathy, understanding, and tolerance.

 

3. Discover Gratitude

One of the most powerful things we can do is practice gratitude. This consistently leads to a direct experience of being connected to your life and being connected to a larger context in which your personal story is unfolding. Some people get confused…they think practicing gratitude is a denial of life’s difficulties. Obviously, we live in trying times, and no doubt you’ve experienced challenges and disappointments. But gratitude frees you from being lost of identified with either negative or positive aspects of life; allowing you to simply meet situations with mindful awareness. Rejoice in the good fortune of others and your own happiness multiplies – it’s the best cure for envy.

 

4. Help Others

Helping others can make all the difference in your happiness and in others lives. If you notice someone needs help, be quick to jump in. Try to alleviate suffering wherever you see it, and consider others perspectives deeply. It can be hard, but observe your reactions with genuine interest and non-attachment. You will find your compassion and patience will naturally spring up out of nowhere. Your heart will begin to guide your decisions. Even if your circumstance is personally challenging (maybe even insulting), it is not always necessary to understand the origins of an experience or a reaction in order to come to peace with it.

Just take a step back and become more of a witness. You’ll notice your entire thought process will change.

 

5. Attune to Wisdom

Wisdom is considered to be one of the most important aspects to develop. It’s almost just as important as compassion, actually. Why Because life is a gigantic gray cloud. It’s not black or white. It’s a big mess that involves complicated decision-making, often choosing things that are really the lesser of two evils. Be open to what arises in every moment. The mind can focus in so many directions: past, present, future, abstract notions or analytical problem solving, to name a few. All forms of thought have a useful role. But try to prioritize awareness of the present moment. Once again, if you slow down your mind, wisdom will naturally spring up, just like compassion.

 

6. Embrace Change

This saying really is true: the one constant in the universe is change. What is real is the existing moment, the present that is a product of the past, or a result of the previous causes and actions. Because of ignorance, an ordinary mind conceives them all to be part of one continuous reality. But in truth, they are not. If you make peace with this simple truth, your life will be much easier.
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Fear of failure or the thrill of Victory

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Having grown up with a narcissistic caregiver, the fear of failure motivated me.
Actually the fear of failing my father’s demands would be more accurate.

 

Many of the greatest athletes ever were driven by fear of failure.
Success and stardom never diminished that insecurity.

 

Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig are perfect examples. One was bombastic, gregarious and happy-go-lucky. The other was shy, boring and very quiet.


One demanded the limelight, lived an excessive life of pleasure with food, alcohol and women.


 

The other had no apparent excess or vices,  playing like a man with average talent. Gehrig was called the iron horse, playing in over 2,000 straight games.  An incredible record that was finally broken by Cal Ripken.

 

One was incorrigible, his parents dropped the Babe off at a catholic orphanage. The other graduated from Columbia university.

 


Babe Ruth was questioned about making more money than the president. He commented he had a better year than the president. Lou Gehrig was a superstar but never felt worthy of that title.

 

A mindful athlete enjoys being in the moment, knowing his self-worth is not connected to external wins and losses.  Not an easy path for most mortals.
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If you needs ideas about gratitude, here are 909

 

From Source of Inspiration: Pat Cegan:

I am starting a gratitude list to help me remember this prayer: “Dear God, may we always be grateful.” I believe that gratitude is the key to serenity.
Truly gratitude is a transformer in our lives. The more I cultivate it, the more joy and serenity I find in my life. Please feel free to add to this list in the comment section…or start your own gratitude list.

1. fresh breezes smelling of loamy ground after a gentle rain

2. little girl giggles that remind me to smile

3. sweet smell of puppies

4. ants marching in a row carrying leaves above their heads

5. raindrops that wash away tears

6. lilacs in the wind

7. friends who make me laugh

8. sweet potato pie with a hint of lemon

9. old men with hairy ears

10. red berries hidden beneath shiny green leaves

11. sweet memories of days gone by

12. mushroom prints that I make during rainy season

13. friends who call just to see how I am

14. walks in the floresta

15. page-turner books cozy quilt on a cold night

16. hic-ups from laughter

17. warm feet next to my cold feet

18. snooze alarms on cold mornings

19. spring water from a house faucet

20. little girls doing cartwheels

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Choices: Expectations and happiness or suffering


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After our basic needs are met, happiness is possible without added achievement, possessions, status, or approval.

 

We choose to create external expectations, (cars, careers, titles, approval, etc).
Unfulfilled expectations lead to loss, sadness, jealousy and maybe depression.

 

We need nothing more than the basics if we live in this moment. Nothing wrong with possessions, just realize happiness is not contained in ownership.

 

On the opposite side of opulence, these awakened monks take a vow of poverty and service. They Meditate for hours each day, offering up loving kindness for all sentient beings.

 

They are acknowledged as being the happiest beings on this planet.

 

They lose no sleep with concerns about owning possessions, titles or wielding power.


Humility and giving dominate their thoughts and behavior.

 

Society associates happiness with business success, status, power and possessions.

 

How would you explain lives like Mother Theresa, Mandela, Lincoln?

 

 Lives of service, sacrifice and giving. The opposite of  pleasure-seeking.

 

Many lives that had incredible hardships, huge emotional loss, were extremely satisfying.
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People who enjoy the most wellbeing _______ ?

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People who enjoy the most wellbeing let the constant flow of thoughts pass on through, unattended.


Some have done this with no meditation practice, just an innate knowing life is most vibrant right now, empty of thought.

 

We travel to exotic places at the ends of the earth on vacation to see the sights, not think about them.

 

We could stay at home and think about the places in outer space we can not reach.

 

For the majority of us, a daily meditation practice, is the tool we use to release thought and stay focused on now.

 

Twenty focused minutes a day can bring change.

 

We have to work, take daily action to train our mind.

 

Depends if you desire thought to rule your mind or you would rather captain this ship.
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Our Attitude is worth many years of life

 

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Matthew Ricard:  “Happiness”


D. Danner and his colleagues studied the longevity of a group of 178 Catholic nuns born in the early twentieth century.


They lived in the same convent and taught at the same school in Milwaukee.

 


Their case is particularly interesting because the outward circumstances of their lives were remarkably similar: the same daily routines, same diet, no tobacco or alcohol, same social and financial status, and, lastly, same access to medical care.

 

These factors eliminated many variables caused by environmental conditions.

 

The researchers analyzed the autobiographical account that each nun had written before taking her vows.

 


Psychologists who knew nothing about these women assessed the positive and negative sentiments expressed in their writings.

 

 

Some had repeatedly mentioned that they were “very happy” or felt “great joy” at the thought of entering monastic life and serving others, while others manifested little or no positive emotion.

 

 

Once the nuns were classified according to the degree of joy and satisfaction expressed in their brief bios, the results were correlated with their longevity.

 


It turned out that 90 percent of the nuns placed in the “most happy” quarter of the group were still alive at eighty-five, as opposed to 34 percent of those in the “least happy” quarter.

 


An in-depth analysis of their writing allowed the elimination of other facts that might have explained the disparate longevity figures:

 

no link was established between the nuns’ longevity and the strength of their faith, the intellectual sophistication of their writing, their hopes for the future, or any other parameter that was considered.

 

In a word, it would seem that happy nuns live longer than unhappy nuns. “
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