Posts Tagged ‘Goals’

What do you do for your mental health, daily?

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People have a hard time letting go of their suffering. Out of a fear of the unknown, they prefer suffering that is familiar.
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Thich Nhat Hanh
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Getting people to take action is the toughest thing a therapist or life coach faces.
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People want a pill to cure them or a therpast to heal them inside that hour session.
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We convince ourself to suffer what habit has taught us over and over.
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Do you work on your mental health?
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Why not?
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Our purpose in life is to be happy, says Matthew Ricard!
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What have you done to cultivate happiness?
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Possessions, approval, success, achievement are just impermanent possessions, surely not happiness.
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Maybe we need to explore our inner world to know what happiness is and where it hangs out.
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Is change so scary or the unknown so terrifying or are we lazy?
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Before we Meditate—-

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We realize that thoughts are air, judgments mirages, control a fallacy.  Scan your body and breathe into tight spots or painful areas.

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Remember to focus on each breath then move on to the next one.

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Where we are headed has no:
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No right or wrong.
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No good or bad.
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No pleasure or pain.
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No decisions, bias or judgments.
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No emotions.
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No I, me, mine or Ego.
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No resistance, control or exertion of influence.
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No avoidance.
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There is specific focus on the breath, a slowing, a calming of the nervous system and heart rate.

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We do let go of thought and emotion, we do listen intently to our inner world.

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What’s left is awareness, acceptance, then surrender to all that arises.

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We are  an observer, watching ourselves in a rerun on imaginary TV.

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The scene we are watching is over with, so comment or influence is uneccesary.

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Relax, let go, enjoy the ride, you are safe.

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Impermanent, unsatisfactory, and not-self. . . . . . .Desire versus gratitude.

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Anything we can attain, accomplish or covet in the future, is impermanent, unsatisfactory and not self.
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Otherwise, affluence would equal happiness, riches would bring lasting joy, and power would shower us with peace of mind.
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None of these statements have any reality, permanence to them.
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All things whither and die or change, even rocks.
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Beauty succumbs to age, possessions fail to calm desire, and being important has a false center.
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Try letting go of needing so much!
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Try gratitude instead of desire for a day.
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Try giving to others without regard for reward.
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Try something different than feeding the “Ego”.
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Concentration: Excerpt From: Catherine, Shaila. “Focused and Fearless.”

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“Concentration brings with it a natural joy that arises as the mind settles and is absent of distraction.
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A surgeon may love surgery, not because the operating room is a pleasant place to be, but because the task demands such complete attention that the mind is filled with the delight associated with concentration.
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Kayakers are often enveloped in rapture even though their bodies are cramped in little boats and splashed by frigid water.
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A concentrated mind is focused, unified, and stable, regardless of whether the conditions are uncomfortable or luxurious.
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In the Pali language of the early Buddhist scriptures, samadhi is the term that has most often been translated into English as “concentration,” yet samadhi describes something more than the narrow focus implied by “concentration.”
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It is a calm unification that occurs when the mind is profoundly undistracted.
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Samadhi is the beautiful state of an undistracted mind, described in the Pali texts as “internally steadied, composed, unified, and concentrated.
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These four qualities indicate that samadhi is not merely focused on a single object.
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It is a state of profound serenity that encompasses a balanced, joyful composure, expressing the natural settledness of undistracted awareness.
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Undisturbed Tranquility: Shaila Again, Wow ,

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Jhana (Mindfulness/Mediatation) practice introduces the mind to the stability of mental unification;
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it drenches the heart with tranquillity.
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Free of desire or aversion,
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thoughts remain quite simple.
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A concentrated mind is essentially undisturbed.
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A mind influenced by jhana is so coherent, almost crystalline,
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that it reenters the world of sensory contact without binding itself to the various perceptions that habitually preoccupy unconcentrated attention.
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After emerging from a deep absorption, the mind is pliable, concentrated, and ready to investigate.
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You can use this steadiness to explore the nuances of the objects that you perceive, or turn your attention from external sensory objects and become aware of knowing itself.
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Exploring the process of perception is a subtle inquiry.
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We do not reject things; we simply are no longer fascinated with them.
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We look into the process of perceiving rather than the content of our perceptions.”
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Left or right prefrontal cortex? Could this equal happy or sad emotions?

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Richard Davidson:

“In each case, low levels of activity in the left frontal region of the brain were associated with depression or pathological crying.

Second, it suggested that the left prefrontal region contributes something quite specific to our emotional life, namely,
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positive emotion
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and the ability to hold in mind a desired goal and form a plan of action to reach it.

The lack of these two components is a striking symptom in depression:
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Many patients report

that the absence of joy

is even more painful

than the presence of sadness,

and the inability to engage

in goal-directed activity

is among the most crippling

manifestations of the disease.”
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Remember, the monks showed the most left prefrontal illumination (Functional MRI’s) while practicing compassion meditation. Slow breath, extremely focused, parasympathetic nervous system engaged, empty of thought, pure consciousness.
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Goals,,,, I have found having no goals moment to moment incredibly opportunistic!!!!

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My mindfulness practice has evolved in many subtle ways. Learning to let go, to be empty, in a no-thought space, eliminated the pursuit of goals momentarily.
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I have found that at times, my accomplishments have far outweighed any set goals that were envisioned.
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I was a quadraplegic with Guillian Beret Disease, bedded down in ICU for the initial three weeks. This paralysis, this damage to my peripheral nervous system, combined with massive weight loss, was complicated by pneumonia, threatened my life.
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I faced the doctors, nurses and therapists in rehab. They gave me a goal of walking again in a year.
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For some reason I did not buy into that barrier. For the first time in my life, focus became my number one priority, all energy was directed at my breath.
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All out effort in the gym, was followed by hours of mindfully focusing on my breath, poised at letting worry go.
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Eight days after everyone told me I was destined for this wheelchair for a year, I walked, not very far or very well.
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Everyone was doumbfounded.
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Their barrier was shattered, their professional experience altered, by a jock who meditated.
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Any goal envisioned, would find this reality unreachable, impossible. I was questioned over and over, how did you do that.
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My first response was, I did not accept your barriers.
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My second sentence was a request for them to never tell another patient he/she will be in a wheelchair a year.
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To this day, I have no idea how or the reasons why I was able to walk. Being present opens up opportunity we can not fathom.
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Sit today and focus on your breath, practice for the time in the future when you will need it.
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