Posts Tagged ‘Focus’

Wasting precious time

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Well, which is it, half full or empty?

 

This  judgment wastes precious time, time spent without a chance for wellbeing.

 

Better to have the mind empty than filled with useless judgments.


Actually it is 4 ounces in an 8 ounce glass, if you want to be accurate. Neither half full or empty.   Add an ounce and do we say 60/40?  Who cares?

 

Waste it on life’s half full or empty judgments and lose.

 

We have to be able to let these easy judgments go or the emotionally charged ones will run our life.

 

Try letting go of as many judgments as possible today.

 

Make more room for being in the space where happy lives.
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A two part post on Fear, the mechanism first!

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Fight or flight mechanism (Adrenal Stress Response)

Freedom From Fear” by Peyton Quinn.

1. “Tunnel Vision: One’s field of vision narrows and tunnels into the perceived threat.

 

2. Auditory Exclusion: The hearing tends to shut off.

 

3. Loss of fine motor skills: Often only gross motor functions are possible under the adrenal state.

 

4. Tai-chi-Psyche: Everything seems to move in slow motion.

 

5. Increased heart rate, blood pressure and respiration.”
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Our Attitude is worth many years of life

 

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Matthew Ricard:  “Happiness”


D. Danner and his colleagues studied the longevity of a group of 178 Catholic nuns born in the early twentieth century.


They lived in the same convent and taught at the same school in Milwaukee.

 


Their case is particularly interesting because the outward circumstances of their lives were remarkably similar: the same daily routines, same diet, no tobacco or alcohol, same social and financial status, and, lastly, same access to medical care.

 

These factors eliminated many variables caused by environmental conditions.

 

The researchers analyzed the autobiographical account that each nun had written before taking her vows.

 


Psychologists who knew nothing about these women assessed the positive and negative sentiments expressed in their writings.

 

 

Some had repeatedly mentioned that they were “very happy” or felt “great joy” at the thought of entering monastic life and serving others, while others manifested little or no positive emotion.

 

 

Once the nuns were classified according to the degree of joy and satisfaction expressed in their brief bios, the results were correlated with their longevity.

 


It turned out that 90 percent of the nuns placed in the “most happy” quarter of the group were still alive at eighty-five, as opposed to 34 percent of those in the “least happy” quarter.

 


An in-depth analysis of their writing allowed the elimination of other facts that might have explained the disparate longevity figures:

 

no link was established between the nuns’ longevity and the strength of their faith, the intellectual sophistication of their writing, their hopes for the future, or any other parameter that was considered.

 

In a word, it would seem that happy nuns live longer than unhappy nuns. “
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Applying Meditation/Mindfulness, using the focus we have built

 

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Happiness exists in only one time zone, this present moment, now.   Happiness does not exist in the past or future.

 

 

That means staying present, being acutely aware of our surroundings without judgment is the goal.

 

 

Check in as often as you can during the day. Focus, take three deep breaths and come back to now, then smile.  It’s working.

 


If we placed all our energy today on this task, opportunity may arrive.

 

 

You may see how much time we waste meandering in thought and connected emotion.

 

 

I still find myself in one of my childhood fantasies, World Series, bottom of the ninth, two outs, bases loaded and I am at bat.

 

 

It is far better than a trauma memory or a negative emotion but it takes me away from now.

 


Now, is what we need.

 


Three letter word changes life, completely. All those worries, doubts and fears fade, leaving us with precious time and energy.

 

 

The mind can be trained to go slow and empty itself of thought with daily focus and application.

 

 


Not a huge effort, but a specialized, specific type of focus and exploration.

 

 

Start your journey with ten minutes a day.
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Opening up to what scares us!

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Thoughts linked to negative emotions or past traumatizing events, arouse our fear, and our fight or flight mechanism (adrenal stress response).

 

 

We have great resistance facing these fears. In fact human nature chases pleasure and avoids the awkward.

 

 

These fears bring anxiety, triggers, flashbacks, hypervigilance, nightmares, memory loss, mental confusion, and panic.

 

 

What is the solution?

 

 

Surrender.

 

 

We visualize our heart as a butterfly net, catching that scary thought, feeling only the body sensation. Absorb what our body has to teach us without thought. We observe our inner worlds reaction.

 

 

Our inner world can be a friend, our nervous system a calming companion.

 


Surrendering like this is safe. We are focused on the breath until thoughts fade.

 

 

As the scary memory enters our focus, we catch this fear, surrender to it, expose our open heart to understand it.

 

 

What we resist, persists. Surrender to your fears with an open heart not a confused mind.
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Distracted versus Focus Mind!!!!

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A distracted mind wanders into quicksand over and over again.

 

 

Worry, doubt, anxiety, resentment, jealousy, and fear lie beneath our distraction.

 


The distracted mind tunes into the noise, the focused mind observes.

 

 

The distracted mind is like Velcro, always slowing down, viewing the accident in the other lane, always attracted to the light of confusion.

 


The focused mind builds awareness and thus has the ability to let all the noise fade into oblivion.

 


Mindfulness is the moment to moment application of focus (awareness).

 


When we find ourselves distracted, we use our focus practice to come back to now, empty of thought.

 

At first, our focus on the breath is more mechanical, becoming more natural and organic with practice.

 

Distracted states:
Worry: The past failures bleed into our future.
Doubt: We judge failure or embarrassment is possible.
Jealousy: Our selfish part needs more.
Anger: Rarely needed, constantly overused.
Fear: Thought and emotion create its own habitual fear.
Anxious: Leads into dissociative thought.
Pessimism: A negative way of living.
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Buddhism and Western medicine: a good read

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Author:

Alex Lickerman, MD, is a physician and former director of primary care at one of the world’s most prestigious universities, the University of Chicago. He is also a practicing Nichiren Buddhist and leader in the Nichiren Buddhist lay organization, the Soka Gakkai International, USA (SGI-USA).

 

Buddhism and Western medicine would seem an incongruous mixture, but in the hands of Alex Lickerman they meld seamlessly into a recipe for overcoming life’s hardships—indeed, for turning them into advantages. An accomplished physician, Lickerman has no truck for the supernatural, but recognizes that the tenets of Nichiren Buddhism have been honed over centuries to help alleviate life’s inevitable sufferings. The Undefeated Mind is a deeply engaging story of how Lickerman has fused modern medicine with ancient wisdom to heal his patients both physically and psychologically—lessons that apply to all of us.”
–Jerry Coyne, professor of Ecology and Evolution at University of Chicago

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