Posts Tagged ‘Focus’

A world class Meditator faces capture and torture

.

.

Matthew Ricard from the book “Happiness”

After the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1959, Tenzin Choedrak, the personal physician of the Dalai Lama, was first sent to a forced labor camp in northeastern Tibet along with some one hundred others.

Five prisoners, himself among them, survived.

He was transferred from camp to camp for nearly twenty years and often thought that he would die of hunger or of the abuse inflicted on him.

A psychiatrist who specializes in post-traumatic stress and who treated Doctor Choedrak was astonished that he showed not the least sign of post-traumatic stress syndrome.

He was not bitter, felt no resentment, displayed serene kindness, and had none of the usual psychological problems, such as anxiety, nightmares, and so on.

Choedrak acknowledged that he occasionally felt hatred for his torturers, but that he always returned to the practice of meditation on inner peace and compassion.

That was what sustained his desire to go on living and ultimately saved him.

.

.

.

My two cents: This meditator did not get PTSD, did not become hyper vigilant, or contemplate suicide.

We do not know what thoughts (demons) any man faces but these world class meditators live life fully.

Suicide is extremely rare or non existent for these world class meditators.

In my mind, a focused meditator will not commit suicide unless there is a severe disorder or a traumatic brain injury.

“He occasionally felt hatred for his torturers, but that he always returned to the practice of meditation on inner peace and compassion.”

We let those hateful, harmful, suicide thoughts pass on through.

.

.

Sheila Catherine: subtle motivations behind your speech today

 

Pixabay: vinsky200

 

.
.
Notice the subtle motivations behind your speech today. When is the primary communication merely your own existence?


Sometimes what is said is not very important; what we are really saying is, “notice me, I’m here, I’m special, I am like this, I am.”


It can be useful to grow sensitive to the tendency to seek respect, appreciation, confirmation, praise, or recognition.


You don’t need to squelch these desires should they arise, but notice how they contribute to the development of self-formations.


Are you in a phase in your life when self-formations are valuable, or are you ready to deconstruct these processes?


You can also observe your internal dialog, ruminations, and daydreams.


“Make a note of moments when the thought “I am” forms. How much of your thinking is recreating and reinforcing the story of being you?


What would the experience of your life be like without the burden of incessant becoming?”
.
.
.

Our doors are open

.

.

It takes strong focus skills to withstand a trigger firing. Our defense mechanism has detected a life threatening situation, reason stops working when this fight or flight fires.

The mind speeds up, time is distorted, perception clouds, panic spreads.

Irrational or PTSD fear makes no difference to a body trying to survive a perceived lethal threat. Cortisol and adrenaline are dumped, respiration, BP and heart rate spike.

Loss of fine motor skills and tunnel vision add to our time distortion and confusing state.

We try to escape at all costs. It is an internal hurricane blowing 200 mph scary thoughts at us.

Sitting quietly, grounded, surrendering to these fears is our ultimate goal.

This is the door to wellbeing, a healing portal of transformation.

We heal by not running, not avoiding, not thinking but accepting, then surrendering to our thoughts (trauma).

This seems an enormous, complex undertaking.

Start with mastering one breath.

Build focus, practice daily, progress to five breaths, then ten, etc.

This simple, specific, concrete, immediate task holds gargantuan, humongous, colossal power.

.

.

Affirmations work

Pixabay: Nasalune-FcK

.

.

In this moment right now, I am capable of letting the noise go, I can shower myself with approval.

Say out loud to engage more of the mind.

Record ten affirmations then play back during the day.

Before bed push play again.

Small repetitive, immediate actions move mountains.

.

.

Unworthy thoughts!

Pixabay: ElisaRiva

.

.

When negative or unworthy thoughts appear, remember the mind can only hold a finite number of thoughts at one time.

I repeat my affirmation, In this moment, right now, I accept all of me. Kindness surrounds my body, a content, calm flows inside me.

So replacing unworthy thoughts with positive ones is a decent strategy. When focus strengthens, we can let these thoughts fade on their own, a better strategy.

It takes practice, building confidence, then facing our fear to improve. Getting better has always aroused deep seated fear.

In childhood it was the threat of abandonment, the ultimate terror for a helpless kid. Fight, flight or freeze became freeze for me. How can you fight a giant or flee to where, as a 6 year old?

I always knew my PTSD symptoms were aroused when I would feel like a child. I was more sensitivity, hyper-vigilant, anxious and frightened.

PTSD fear became the unknown at times, a future disaster on the horizon. My triggers were so irrational, ridiculous, funny if they did not fire my adrenal stress response.

When I was younger, public speaking was my ultimate fear.

I had no clue my trauma was manifesting my deep unworthiness into panic. In front of a group my anxiety made it hard to breathe, terror filled my being.

If a speech was scheduled a week from today, I would die an arduous death daily. By the day of the speech, hospitalization would be kinder or a firing squad.

Knowing real fear was not present cognitively did not stop my triggers firing, or panic exploding.

Thinking will not heal us, being able to focus and not think for periods of time will.

.

.

Parentdectomy in relational healing: Pete Walker

https://thetraumainformedteacher.com/what-exactly-is-trauma-anyway/

.

.

“When a parent is unrelentingly toxic, hearing even a few words from them can trigger the survivor into an intense emotional flashback.

I have worked with numerous clients who made very little progress in their recovery while they maintained contact with the toxic parent[ s].

For this reason, such clients usually require a parentdectomy to progress.

There is a classic book by Bob Hoffman on this topic entitled Getting Divorced from Mother & Dad.

.

.

.

My two cents: I asked for help from my family first, when that failed, I distanced myself.

Healing was impossible with their meddling.

Now, I am disowned but healed.

I am fine with that arrangement .

Hopefully, you will be also.

.

.

If boredom is an issue, you are not using the mind properly!

tianya1223: Pixabay

.
.
From the book Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom by Rick Hanson.

“The brain is the primary mover and shaper of the mind.

It’s so busy that, even though it’s only 2 percent of the body’s weight, it uses 20–25 percent of its oxygen and glucose.

Like a refrigerator, it’s always humming away, performing its functions; consequently, it uses about the same amount of energy whether you’re deep asleep or thinking hard.

The number of possible combinations of 100 billion neurons firing or not is approximately 10 to the millionth power, or 1 followed by a million zeros, in principle; this is the number of possible states of your brain.”

.

.

.

My two cents: “1 followed by a million zeros”, possible states of our brain.

To me, it seems imperative we keep our minds focused, calm, aware.

That means the mind performs best going slow, focused, aware of where it is directing the mind or just being in the moment.

All those opportunities could be such a distraction, confusing, tiring, emotionally unnerving.

Be the captain of your mind, keep your ship calm and focused.
.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: