Posts Tagged ‘Fear’

Acceptance seems a battle with our “Ego”

 

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As most humans I have strengths and vulnerabilities, ambitions and fears, desires and demons.
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The desire for approval suppresses my acceptance. Wanting and needing others approval is the work of the ego.
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Accepting all of oneself, now, has little need for approval.
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This accepting space has many opportunities for wellbeing and happiness.
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Acceptance is a tall task I struggle to fully accomplish.
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Parts of me that feel unworthy keep resurfacing with life’s stresses.
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My unworthy parts are targeted using a daily affirmation repeated outloud, by directed intention when I sit and by application during the day.
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Assess your strengths and weaknesses, then devise a plan for improving.
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We are not accomplishing anything, we are working on letting negative judgments go, letting the ego rest.
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We never arrive or complete our journey, we just live fully today then wake up tomorrow.
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Mindfulness Practice: “Living with the Heart Wide open”

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Mindful Self-Inquiry
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We can learn to be suspicious of particular thoughts, such as most judgmental and repetitive thoughts and any self-hating thoughts.
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There’s wisdom in suspecting that something is amiss in this kind of thinking.
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It can lead to investigations and discoveries about how you color your world and how you make yourself miserable or happy through the filter of your thoughts.
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This type of investigation can help you see what is real and what isn’t, and what thoughts to believe or not.
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When you don’t automatically believe all of your thoughts, they’ll lose their power to shape a faulty sense of self.
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Mindful self-inquiry is a practice that can help you investigate anything, including the pain of old wounds, as well as other unpleasant thoughts and stories that create suffering.
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Because unworthiness is a kind of trance that obstructs clear seeing, self-inquiry can be useful in drawing back the veil and seeing the unconscious reactions that perpetuate the cycle of pain and suffering.
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It involves looking deeply and unflinchingly into your wounded heart in order to see things more objectively—without judgment and without avoidance.
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This work involves tenderness and a friendly kind of curiosity.
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selflishness ends

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Bowie on the left and Brighton on the right .
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Happiness begins where selfishness ends.
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John Wooden
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Freedom

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Freeimages.co.uk

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The outward freedom that we shall attain

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will only be in exact proportion

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to the inward freedom

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to which we may have grown at a given moment.

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And if this is a correct view of freedom,

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our chief energy must be concentrated on achieving reform from within.

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MAHATMA GANDHI

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Exploring Our inner World

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Tulip Farm, Tasmania
Photograph by Anthony Crehan, Your Shot
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Mindfulness is a tool, a focus exercise that allows us to explore our inner world.
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The two pauses, after the inhale and exhale, bring our bodies into a sort of suspended animation stage.
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The mind and body are still, nothing moving, a pure opportunity to notice, to observe any sensation, tightness, agitation, sound, twitch or inner feeling.
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Maybe we observe complete silence, a deep quiet, or extreme agitation, or internal anxiety or mild tingling sensations.
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We are detectives, tasked with mapping our emotions internally.
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Where does fear, worry, anxiety, and anger reside, manifest themselves in the body.
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Some  emotions maybe acute, sharp, while others are dull or diffuse, while other are choppy, scary and others agitate the nervous system.

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It maybe the throat area, solar plexus, between the shoulder blades or in the groin area.
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Become friends with your fear, your fight or flight mechanism and life will calm down.
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Mindfulness has far more power and application than you could ever imagine.
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If happiness is an internal condition, it follows we should explore and become familiar with our inner world.
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Stuck Parts and healing

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Forest, Serbia
Photograph by Misko Kordic, Your Shot
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I am currently working on my stuck parts along with my daily, healthy, functioning parts. So far I have identified these parts: Warrior, Helper, Curious part, Giver (compassionate), Doer, Critic, Ashamed part, Worrier.
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The stuck parts are Critic, Ashamed child and Worrier.
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The trick is to prop up the healthy parts to support and integrate the stuck parts.
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Helper parts give the frightened, stuck parts a safe and secure atmosphere to work in. We soothe and caress our critic thus slowing down the hopeless, helpless feelings of the shamed and worrier parts.
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My shame part developed in childhood and was stored at that early stage.
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Meditating allows me to relax, to access the ultimate safe place, to breathe into my anxious, nervous system.
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Mindfulness helps with emotional regulation, with dissipating cortisol, with firing the parasympathetic nervous system, with applying the brakes to our nervous system.
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Our minds can be the cause of our suffering or the reason we heal and prosper.
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Holding on too long!

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Wave Breaking, Oahu
Photograph by Freddy Booth, Your Shot
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Holding on is believing that there’s a past;
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letting go is knowing that there’s a future.
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—Daphne Rose Kingma
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