Posts Tagged ‘Fear’

Worry quote

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“Worry is a misuse of imagination. “

Dan Zadra

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The contents of our conscious mind (Bandwidth)

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In the TV series “Elementary” Holmes decries, resist filling your mind with unimportant data. It works much better using less bandwidth.

For some reason we try to fill our mind constantly, avoiding being alone with our mind empty at all costs.

We will binge on TV, a hobby, constant worry or anything else than be alone with our mind.

Why?

Worthless trivia clogs the mind, think what trauma thoughts do to the minds ability to focus.

We can only focus on a finite amount of data at one time (bandwidth).

Think of our conscious ability at any moment as the contents of a glass container.

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Some basic functions are always present during waking hours, our defense mechanism, balance, motor skills, breathing and bodily functions, there to keep us alive and safe.

From here our choices decide how our life unfolds.

Anxiety, worry, doubt, resentment and fear take up valuable space.

These emotions can attract enormous amounts of thought and judgment filling our glass to capacity.

I know, my childhood PTSD filled my mind with constant worry and irrational fear.

No room was left for anything else.

Good emotions, joy and then happiness have no room to visit.

This described my suffering for decades.

Now, I have room, my glass rarely overflows.

My happiest time during the day is when I am focused, empty of thought and emotion, just observing what me eyes see.

Funny, a cool breeze, a perfect flower or a massive tree can bring a big grin and a peaceful feeling.

I like to think, but only when I am aware and directing where my thoughts go.

I refuse to ruminate or judge and am quick to let go of any judgment that happens automatically.

With my mind empty and focused in this present moment, I have an opportunity to be happy.

What fills your glass today?

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Failure is impossible.

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Failure is impossible.

We control two things, effort and attitude. Effort and Attitude can be enormous anchors in life.

Results are far beyond our control and miles above our pay grade. Life happens, suffering will visit your doorstep, happiness will arrive as a choice.

Remember failure is impossible if we give all out effort with a good attitude. My PTSD melts away when I am present, focused and living fully.

We can not change the past, my childhood abuse sabotaged my life until I reached 60.

In my mind, I decided that was enough, “No more” was my mantra.

In this moment, my past has died, unlimited opportunity is available.

Rick Hanson in “Buddha’s Brain” shares this: “The number of possible combinations of 100 billion neurons firing or not is approximately 10 to the millionth power, or 1 followed by a million zeros, in principle; this is the number of possible states of your brain.”

Sounds like at the cellular level we have unlimited opportunity available.

I can be sad for the suffering of others, along with being able to experience happiness within my inner world.

Death is inevitable, our journey is where we get to choose suffering or thriving under any circumstance.

We all have bad moments, weak moments, the trick is to limit their duration.

I give intention before meditating for all sentient beings, those suffering.

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A great insight

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“For us, there is only the trying.

The rest is not our business.”

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– T. S. Elliot

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I love this, so simple, so powerful, so bare.

This quote tells me my effort and attitude are far more important than my thoughts, desires and emotional worries.

In fact, I am at my best, focused, observing without judgment.

Judgment and thought can be our invisible prison during this pandemic.

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Physical and Emotional Pain: The Undeafeated Mind!

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Though the experience of physical pain and emotional pain are clearly different, functional imaging studies show that, with few exceptions, the regions of the brain that these types of pain activate are identical.

These include not only the regions responsible for giving pain its unpleasant character, but also those responsible for regulating its size, location, and intensity (perhaps partially explaining the startling finding that Tylenol, a centrally acting pain reliever, alleviates not only the pain of a smashed finger but also the pain of hurt feelings.

No wonder, then, that physical and emotional pain produce the same reaction: a strong desire to avoid the things that cause them.

“Suffer what there is to suffer. Enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life,” wrote Nichiren Daishonin.

Yet most of us clearly don’t.

Unfortunately, the strategies we use to avoid emotional pain often cause more harm than does the experience of emotional pain itself:

more harm results, for example, from excessive drinking or drug use than from the anxiety they’re often used to anesthetize;

more harm results from relationship sabotage than from the fear of intimacy that often drives it.

Not only that, but attempting to suppress emotional pain may paradoxically increase it.

In contrast, being accepting of emotional pain, being willing to experience it without attempting to control it, has actually been found to decrease it.

In one study of patients with generalized anxiety disorder, for example, subjects who were taught to accept their anxiety reported substantial reductions in worry, reductions that persisted even beyond the duration of the study.

But such a decrease is only a happy byproduct, for the true purpose of acceptance isn’t to diminish emotional pain but rather to become more comfortable feeling it.

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Endure the Pain—-Choose your attitude: Viktor E. Frankl

https://pixabay.com/users/geralt-9301/………. which apple are you?

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“We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread.

They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms —

to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”

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My two cents: Seems to me we are faced with the unknown right now, our attitude during quarantine means everything.

If man can have a good attitude enduring the horrors of a concentration camp, why not us right now?

Can you find some joy in the middle of this pandemic?

Be proud of those risking their lives to save us.

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We lose touch with the underlying vastness within us.

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Excerpt from the “Heart of Meditation”

In other words, the moment we begin to focus on objects—including thoughts, perceptions, and ideas—we lose touch with the underlying vastness within us.

And because thoughts, feelings, sensations, and perceptions fill our awareness almost every moment of our existence, it is no wonder we rarely see the ocean of consciousness inside us.

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My two cents: It is important to realize how irrational our thoughts and emotions can become during times like this.

Our ability to let go of thoughts, fear or doubt and is vital.

Observe, be aware of your patterns.

Be forgiving towards yourself first, then others around you.

Release any blame or resentment, grasp kindness and compassion.

Accept we are on this journey in harmony, not competition.

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