Posts Tagged ‘Emotions’

A sense of Responsibility

https://pixabay.com/users/geralt-9301/

.

.

In the elderly, feeling a sense of responsibility has been found not only to improve daily functioning but also to increase lifespan.

In a study of nursing home patients by researchers Ellen Langer and Judith Rodin, residents on one floor were given a plant for which they themselves were expected to care (the experimental group)

while residents on another floor were given a plant for which their nurses would care (the control group).

After three weeks, 93 percent of residents in the experimental group showed an overall improvement in socialization, alertness, and general function; in contrast, for 71 percent of residents in the control group functioning actually declined.

And in a follow-up study eighteen months later, half as many of the residents who’d received plants for which they were expected to care by themselves had died as the residents who’d been given plants for which their nurses cared.

Finally, perhaps the most significant way in which embracing a sense of personal responsibility increases resilience is by motivating action (remember, resilience is also defined by our ability to persevere through obstacles).

In fact, feeling responsible for achieving an outcome may motivate us even more powerfully than our desire to achieve it.

After all, a sense of responsibility often makes us do things we don’t want to do.

.

.

We lose touch with the underlying vastness within us.

https://pixabay.com/users/Shutterbug75-2077322/

.

.

Excerpt from the “Heart of Meditation”

In other words, the moment we begin to focus on objects—including thoughts, perceptions, and ideas—we lose touch with the underlying vastness within us.

And because thoughts, feelings, sensations, and perceptions fill our awareness almost every moment of our existence, it is no wonder we rarely see the ocean of consciousness inside us.

.

.

.

My two cents: It is important to realize how irrational our thoughts and emotions can become during times like this.

Our ability to let go of thoughts, fear or doubt and is vital.

Observe, be aware of your patterns.

Be forgiving towards yourself first, then others around you.

Release any blame or resentment, grasp kindness and compassion.

Accept we are on this journey in harmony, not competition.

.

.

What our mind conjures up during times like this… ….”Focused and Fearless

https://pixabay.com/users/Bessi-909086/

.

.

“Look into the stories, fantasies, fabrications, desires, aversions, reactions, and doubts that periodically occupy your thoughts.

Notice what your mind conjures up in the first moments after waking up in the morning—that period between waking and breakfast is a fascinating window into your habitual thought patterns.

Where does your mind go when you sit down for a few moments to rest without the distractions of radio or TV?

Take ten minutes now and lie down on your bed watching the mind without falling asleep.

What patterns of thought dominate?

Where does your mind wander when it is not directed by the structure of a task?

Can you identify your habitual thinking pattern?

Is it blame? memory? fantasies of success? complaining? worry? insecurities about finances, relationships, opinions, self-image? are you planning your next activity?”

.

.

.

I find myself with free time, so more posts: Desires can grow during this Pandemic

Pixabay: Huskyherz
.
.
I have learned to seek my happiness by limiting my desires,


rather than in attempting to satisfy them.


John Stuart Mill

.

.

.

My two cents: Satisfying desire is impossible. Satisfaction only leads to more desire.

Desire can grow and multiply till we are chasing pleasure 24/7.

That first banana split was Devine, the second great, the third made me sick.

Sound familiar.

Desires can grow when we are isolated.

Are your desires growing during this pandemic?

.

.

Shaila Catherine chimes in on “Doubt”

https://pixabay.com/users/ErikaWittlieb-427626/

.

.

“It is imperative for the sincere meditator to unwaveringly witness the functions of desire, aversion, restlessness, and doubt, witness these forces arising—but without acting them out, without buying into them.

See them arise as empty thoughts, and see them pass just as quickly. . If they are not seen clearly, these mental states can obstruct progress in concentration.

Doubt can assail the mind with indecision, worry, or chronic judgment.

Unabated, the momentum of uncertainty can paralyze spiritual progress.

Yet doubt is nothing more than a thought.

Through examining the experience of doubt, you will come to understand doubt, rather than be consumed by it.

Doubt is a category of thought that you can definitively set aside.

The very instant you realize you are thinking you have an opportunity to affect the patterns of mind.

Thoughts of self can clutter attention with a plethora of diversified tales—preventing composure, stillness, and unification.

Concentration abandons this diffusing activity.

When you clearly perceive a thought, natural disinterest replaces identification with the stories.

As the mind calms, mental seclusion is established.

.

.

.

Dealing with Panic, worry and doubt

https://pixabay.com/users/creozavr-2567670/

.

.

When panic arrives surrender to it!

Avoiding triggers at all cost describes most of our behavior. Unfortunately this fuels depression, anxiety and PTSD.

Fear can grow to massive proportions inside our head.

Our panic (Fear) for the most part is irrational.

We can only quarantine ourselves and abide by the guidelines, after that more worry and doubt harms us.

We have an opportunity in this crisis to change our relationship with worry, doubt and fear.

For once my daughter asked why I am so calm during this pandemic?

I am usually the one with my mind working overtime, worrying every minute, consumed.

Practice has enabled me to let the extra worry and doubt go.

It takes no more time, in fact it creates time wasted worrying.

It is simple as possible.

Specifically we accept, then surrender to our worry and panic when it arrives.

We slow our nervous system using the breath, then focus on calming the heart, listening for the quietest sound.

Negative thoughts and emotions are the Enemy.

We battle them by withholding attention, time in our consciousness.

Unless we are aware of these negative thoughts and emotions proliferating, we suffer.

Paying attention takes no more time and costs nothing.

Awareness is always first, followed by acceptance then surrendering everything we fear and deny.

Lots of free time and opportunity.

Choices we make will determine the next few months.

.

.

https://pixabay.com/users/iXimus-2352783/

.

.

Abandon what is not yours?

https://pixabay.com/users/pixel2013-2364555/

.

Excerpt from “Focused and Fearless”

Some people fear that letting go could diminish the quality of their lives, health, abilities, achievements, or personal property.

To this, the Buddha said, “Whatever is not yours, abandon it; when you have abandoned it, that will lead to your welfare and happiness for a long time.”

This invites a profound reflection on what one can authentically claim as one’s own.

As we discern the impermanent, conditioned character of all material and mental processes, we eliminate perceptions, sensory experience, and material things as fields for possession.

On the surface it seems like we are asked to give up everything, but simultaneously comes the realization that there is actually nothing possessed and consequently nothing that can actually be given up.

The great abandonment is to let go of the concept of ownership.

Letting go in meditation is the relinquishment that involves no loss.

Recognizing impermanence leads to the realization of the pure and ungraspable nature of things.

Knowing this basic fact of things, one has nothing to fear.

.

.

%d bloggers like this: