Posts Tagged ‘Emotions’

one virtue of mindfulness meditation

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After all,
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one virtue of mindfulness meditation
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is that experiencing your feelings with care and clarity,
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rather than following them reflexively and uncritically,
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lets you choose which ones to follow—like, say,
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joy, delight, and love.
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Robert Wright
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Updated: Shaila Catherine: . . Emotions And Feelings

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“Noticing change and observing the spaces between feelings can bring a balanced perspective to emotion.
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Emotions are an expression of empty phenomena that arise in response to stimulus, are experienced, and cease.
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The Buddha described a human being as a guesthouse;
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many kinds of feelings come,
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stay for a while,
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and then travel on.
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Try greeting all emotions as visitors or guests.
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Allow them to visit,
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accept that they arise due to conditions,
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but don’t adopt them as permanent residents.”
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Let us practice, play with our emotions, bringing awareness to the correlating body sensation.
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Some strong emotions coupled with a storyline can launch a trauma trigger.
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Get to know your emotions intimately, how they arrive, stay a while, then exit.
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Notice how difficult it is to feel two emotions at once.
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Notice the difficulty trying to experience an opposite emotion.
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Replace anger with joy or vice versa.
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Practice till it is habit and extremely familiar.
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Mindfulness Practice: “Living with the Heart Wide open”

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Mindful Self-Inquiry
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We can learn to be suspicious of particular thoughts, such as most judgmental and repetitive thoughts and any self-hating thoughts.
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There’s wisdom in suspecting that something is amiss in this kind of thinking.
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It can lead to investigations and discoveries about how you color your world and how you make yourself miserable or happy through the filter of your thoughts.
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This type of investigation can help you see what is real and what isn’t, and what thoughts to believe or not.
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When you don’t automatically believe all of your thoughts, they’ll lose their power to shape a faulty sense of self.
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Mindful self-inquiry is a practice that can help you investigate anything, including the pain of old wounds, as well as other unpleasant thoughts and stories that create suffering.
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Because unworthiness is a kind of trance that obstructs clear seeing, self-inquiry can be useful in drawing back the veil and seeing the unconscious reactions that perpetuate the cycle of pain and suffering.
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It involves looking deeply and unflinchingly into your wounded heart in order to see things more objectively—without judgment and without avoidance.
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This work involves tenderness and a friendly kind of curiosity.
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Choices: the Ego or Mindfulness

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The ego grasps identity, needs approval, covets achievement, and wallows in a sense of superiority.
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Mindfulness is about letting go, bringing perspective to desires.
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The ego is rigid and narrow, mindful flexible and expansive.
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The ego is created, mindful just is.
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The ego feels isolated, better or worse, never equal, the mindful totally connected to one another and things.
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The ego is filled with desires, the mindful, satisfied with life exactly like it is.
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The ego judges, the mindful accepts.
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The ego avoids, the mindful stays even when vulnerable.
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The ego has goals, the mindful, this present moment.
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The ego restricts growth, the mindful has unlimited opportunity.
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The ego feels unworthy, the mindful  complete.
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The ego races, the mindful enjoys, and slows down.
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The ego affiliates with anger, hate, resentment, the mindful has perspective and balance when expressing emotions.
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The ego is lonely, the mindful at peace.
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The ego is sad, the mindful happy.
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Why Meditate: Working with thoughts and emotions

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Altruistic love—also called loving-kindness—is the wish that others be happy and that they find the true causes of happiness.
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Compassion is defined as the desire to put an end to the suffering of others and the causes of that suffering.
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These are not merely noble sentiments; they are feelings that are fundamentally in tune with reality.
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All beings want to avoid suffering just as much as we do.
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Moreover, since we are all interdependent, our own happiness and unhappiness are intimately bound up with the happiness and unhappiness of others.
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Cultivating love and compassion is a win-win situation.
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Personal experience shows that they are the most positive of all mental states and create a deep sense of fulfillment and wholesomeness.
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Research in neuroscience also indicates that among all kinds of meditations, those focusing on unconditional love and compassion give rise to the strongest activation of brain areas related to positive affects.
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In addition, the behavior these forms of meditation give rise to is intended to benefit others.
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If the deeds we perform for the sake of others are to have the intended benefit, they must also be guided by wisdom—the wisdom that we can acquire through analysis and meditation and that gives us a more correct understanding of Reality.
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From Coping with Trauma Related Dissociation:

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Photograph by Laura Jean Peterman, My Shot
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People with dissociative disorder often have related problems of time distortions.
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They experience time passing by much too slow or fast; perhaps more time has passed than they thought, or an hour seems like an entire day.
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Some parts of the personality are often quite confused about where they are in space and time, believing they are still in the past.
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When people with a dissociative disorder are alienated from their body, they may be insensitive to physical pain or lack sensation in parts of their body.
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Some people report that they do not always always properly register heat and cold, cannot feel whether they are hungry or tired, or feel numb in their body.
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Again, it is typically the case other parts of the self do feel the physical pain., the hunger, or other bodily sensations.
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There are many different symptoms of depersonalization, but in every case it seems to be a way of avoidance or attempting to regulate overwhelming feelings or experiences.
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Depersonalization symptoms may be temporary or chronic.
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Ricard: Learning to welcome Difficult Emotions

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“One crucial aspect of working with our emotions is learning to stop viewing them as obstacles to our happiness.
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We almost always judge the emotions that feel bad as bad; we see them as the enemy, as something to be conquered or eradicated.”
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I think our judging happens without thought, as though it is an involuntary reflex, habitually practiced with every external experience.
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We avoid our own body functions, adrenal stress response (fight or flight), difficult emotions, (fear, anxiety, self doubt, anxiety, etc.), pain or unpleasantness.
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Having the ability to experience awkward, unpleasant, or anxious situations without judgment frees us to experience this current moment.
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Go visit an uncomfortable or awkward situation today without reacting, without judging until these emotions subside.
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Let the storyline go and feel the body sensations, intimately, quietly.
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On the surface judging steals our waking time needed to experience happiness, freedom,the present moment, life.
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99% of all judgments impact our chance of being happy negatively.
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Healing, finding happiness is not a birth right, it is earned through daily work.
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