Posts Tagged ‘Emotions’

Problems are always present

Pixabay: geralt / 20634 images

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“Nothing to Grasp” by Joan Tollifson

“I’ve discovered that there is no end to problems.

When we cure one problem, a new one emerges.

But this only becomes a source of suffering if we imagine it should or could be otherwise.

In fact, the turbulent, cloudy weather is as integral to the whole as the clear, sunny weather.

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My two cents: We must endure life’s hard times to earn the better times.

Accept the challenges life presents as part of the journey.

We are lacking nothing that prevents us from being happy.

Nothing!

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The Complex Mind can handle simple commands

Pixabay

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Rick Hanson in “Buddha’s Brain” shares this: “The number of possible combinations of 100 billion neurons firing or not is approximately 10 to the millionth power, or 1 followed by a million zeros, in principle; this is the number of possible states of your brain.”

Extremely complex with incredible chances for opportunity.

Why would we choose negative stimuli to focus on?

We have a choice.

This morning we could only entertain positive, hopeful and soothing thoughts.

Hanson says:

“It’s so busy that, even though it’s only 2 percent of the body’s weight, it uses 20–25 percent of its oxygen and glucose.”

Choose optimism, a bounty of gratitude and kindness.

Choose to be present, in harmony with the earth and others.

Let being special or selfish alone.

Just be an observer for a while, letting the one who judges rest for a long while.

Can you give up judgments today?

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an old koan about a monk and Anger!

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excerpt from “Everyday Zen” by Charlotte joko Beck

“There is an old koan about a monk who went to his master and said,

“I’m a very angry person, and I want you to help me.”

The master said, “Show me your anger.”

The monk said, “Well, right now I’m not angry. I can’t show it to you.”

And the master said,

“Then obviously it’s not you, since sometimes it’s not even there.”

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my two cents: Emotions are ephemeral, fleeting and transparent, I am so much more than that.

Why not be grateful instead of angry?

Why not be kind instead of feeling sorry for ourself?

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How fragile is your “Ego”?

Pixabay: johnhain

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Some of our most accomplished athletes and artists have extremely fragile “Egos”.

Accomplishments, possessions, or status only hide unworthiness, shame and guilt.

Many times fear of loss, embarrassment or ridicule drives us to overachieve.

Overachievement gave my “Ego” cover, a place to hide its shame.

External possessions merely cover up that fragile “Ego” with powerful looking facades. Athletic stardom gave my “Ego” the mirage of looking confident, complete.

Unworthiness must be hidden away. We feel our “Ego” could be annihilated if our unworthiness is exposed publicly.

We live in fear of being discovered as unworthy, down to our core.

The “Ego” craves shiny objects that bring approval.

An “Ego” exposed to childhood trauma feels damaged, broken, not deserving love.

Our “Ego” did not form a healthy attachment with our first caregivers.

This unworthiness is at the core of all our suffering in later life.

This can be repaired later in life, but not without intense work.

Can you detect your “Ego” when he/she is out front?

Any strong emotion or upset summons our personal identity.

Remember we create the “Ego” for identity, not to make any decisions, and definitely not to run our life.

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Dealing with our fight or flight mechanism firing violently!

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PTSD reaches its most terrifying peak when a trigger explodes violently, preparing us for a perceived lethal threat.

So another counterintuitive moment arrives in the face of healing from PTSD. At its peak, the most powerful moment, PTSD is also at its most vulnerable.

PTSD is a bluff. I have never read this from a book or heard it from a therapist, it is my personal experience.

A violently firing PTSD trigger is the greatest opportunity to heal we will ever receive.

PTSD can not play defense.

If we can focus and stay present during a trigger erupting, some integration will occur.

In layman terms PTSD will lose power when we stay present, empty of thought, focused on the breath, or body sensations.

Our thoughts add the fear to our fight or flight mechanism. There is no fear contained inside our defense mechanism.

Fear is created by our negative judgments and trauma memories kept alive by scary thoughts. PTSD is a disorder that thrives in the past then brings constant worry into our future.

PTSD will die if forced to live in the present moment. PTSD needs duration in our consciousness.

PTSD needs rumination, time spent thinking, or judging to fuel this destructive disorder.

PTSD gets worse with time not better. If you want to heal from PTSD, first make friends with your fight or flight mechanism, your nervous system.

Sit quietly, focus, explore your inner world.

PTSD is a bluff, it is our own defense mechanism we run away from.

Follow a trigger through completion.

We are triggered, adrenaline and cortisol are secreted. Loss of fine motor skills, tunnel vision, auditory exclusion, bp, respiration and respiration spike.

Our response happens. We either avoid, deny, try to escape or stay present. After a while, the. neurotransmitters dilute and our body calms down to normal.

That’s correct, nothing has happened to harm us. Our defense mechanism perceived danger, fired to protect us, then receded to a normal state.

We are not damaged. Our defense mechanism works and is ready to protect us in the future.

Then where is the real threat?

It is in our thoughts and fears, a mirage of trauma itself.

Realize nothing happens after a trigger settles down.

That was my dilemma but I ran from every trigger for years until I found a weapon to destroy it.

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Simple and Complex: how does it work

Pixabay: PublicDomainPictures

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The mind is extremely complex, we program it in the simplest of ways.

Bring acute awareness to where you place minute by minute attention. (A simple task)

PTSD is complex (complex PTSD even more complex), healing is simple and repetitive.

Focus on the breath, build your intensity, letting go becomes much easier. (Simple). Refuse to dissociate, this is our daily battlefield.

Work on one thing at a time, a laser approach, not an abstract shotgun blast.

Less effort needed when we use a laser to heal.

As Bruce Lee says, “I do not fear the man who practices 10,000 kicks, I fear the man who practices one kick 10,000 times.”

Explore your inner word, become friends with your nervous system.

Our breath controls the nervous system, our ability to calm down, feel safe and secure, free to enjoy life.

Simple things, like grasping only positive emotions takes no extra time.

Being aware uses no extra time or effort.

Accepting takes as much time as judging or grasping.

Why choose to suffer?

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life includes the whole show, the light and the dark, part two, 2,

Hong Kong photographer Vincent Wu’s image of the Hill of the Buddha at the Makomanai Takino Cemetery in Sapporo, Japan.

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“Nothing to Grasp” by Joan Tollifson

Instead of trying to intentionally fix or improve “myself” or “the world,” I am more open to allowing everything to heal itself in its own way, in its own time, as it does anyway.

There is a devotion to the immediacy of life exactly as it is right now, without superimposing any kind of spin.

This bare intimacy is neither an effortful, goal-oriented, improvement-seeking exertion, nor is it any kind of passive or fatalistic resignation.

It is an energetic aliveness, an openness that includes everything and sticks to nothing.

It is not something “you” achieve or acquire, but simply the boundlessness, the bare being that is always already fully present right here, right now.

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