Posts Tagged ‘Ego’

Ricard: Learning to welcome Difficult Emotions

Footpath through dense greenery

Freeimages.co.uk
.
.
.
“One crucial aspect of working with our emotions is learning to stop viewing them as obstacles to our happiness.
.
.
We almost always judge the emotions that feel bad as bad; we see them as the enemy, as something to be conquered or eradicated.”
.
.
.
.
I think our judging happens without thought, as though it is an involuntary reflex, habitually practiced with every external experience.
.
.
We avoid our own body functions, adrenal stress response (fight or flight), difficult emotions, (fear, anxiety, self doubt, anxiety, etc.), pain or unpleasantness.
.
.
Having the ability to experience awkward, unpleasant, or anxious situations without judgment frees us to experience this current moment.
.
.
Go visit an uncomfortable or awkward situation today without reacting, without judging until these emotions subside.
.
.
Let the storyline go and feel the body sensations, intimately, quietly.
.
.
On the surface judging steals our waking time needed to experience happiness, freedom,the present moment, life.
.
.
99% of all judgments impact our chance of being happy negatively.
.
.
Healing, finding happiness is not a birth right, it is earned through daily work.
.
.
.

Life?

image

Asher Brown Durand (American, 1796-1886)
.
.
.
“Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes.
.
.
Don’t resist them; that only creates sorrow.
.
.
Let reality be reality.
.
.
Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.
.
.
Lao Tzu
.
.
.

Believing and accepting

image

Jacob Van Ruysdael (or Jacob van Ruisdael, Dutch, ca.1628-1682)
.
.
.
“Because one believes in oneself, one doesn’t try to convince others.
.
.
Because one is content with oneself, one doesn’t need others’ approval.
.
.
Because one accepts oneself, the whole world accepts him or her.”
.
.
Lao Tzu
.
.
.

Never say or entertain a negative thought about yourself!!!!

image

Deer Sight: Photograph by Moricz Csaba, National Geographic Your Shot
.
.
.
The left brain is extremely literal, say anything negative and it will dig up supporting evidence from memory, reinforcing the unworthiness.
.
.
60,000 thought invade our consciousness daily, grasp the negative ones and suffer.
.
.
How do we navigate this space?
.
.
First let go of thought, focus on the breath, be in the present moment.
.
.
Next, add daily affirmations, I strive with all my energy to accept myself, entirely, all my flaws and perfection at this present moment.
.
.
Know the “Ego” is an imaginary figure we create for identity, not the captain our vessel.
.
.
Stop believing there is something in the future we can accomplish or gain that will bring happiness.
.
.
Everything we need to be complete, satisfied and happy exists right now, right here.
.
.
Disappointment and loss await those who chase approval, superiority, possessions or status.
.
.
Try loving kindness instead, giving altruistically without regard for reward, to find happiness.
.
.
.

The Ego versus Mindfulness!

image

Dry Run: Photograph by Aya Okawa, National Geographic Your Shot
.
.
.
The ego grasps identity, needs approval, achievement, a sense of superiority.
.
Mindfulness is about letting go, bringing perspective to desires.
.
The ego is rigid and narrow, mindful flexible and expansive.
.
The ego is created, mindful just is.
.
The ego feels isolated, better or worse not equal, the mindful totally connected to one another and things.
.
The ego always needs, the mindful, fulfilled with life exactly like it is.
.
The ego judges, the mindful accepts.
.
The ego avoids, the mindful stays even when vulnerable.
.
The ego has goals, the mindful a journey.
.
The ego restricts growth, the mindful unlimited opportunity.
.
The ego feels unworthy, the mindful complete.
.
The ego races, the mindful enjoys, slows.
.
The ego affiliates with anger, hate, resentment, the mindful has perspective and balance when expressing emotions.
.
The ego is lonely, the mindful at peace.
.
The ego is sad, the mindful happy.
.
.
.

The relationship between “I” and Happiness!

image

THEODORE ROBINSON: “La débâcle”, 1892 – oil on canvas – Scripps College, Claremont, California –
.
.
.
.
When you take things personally—or hunger for approval—what happens?
.
.
You suffer.
.
.
When you identify with something as “me” or try to possess something as “mine,”
.
.
you set yourself up for suffering,
.
.
since all things are frail and will inevitably pass away.
.
.
When you stand apart from other people and the world as “I,”
.
.
you feel separate and vulnerable—and suffer.
.
.
On the other hand, when you relax the subtle sense of contraction at the very nub of “me”—when you’re immersed in the flow of life rather than standing apart from it, when ego and egotism fade to the background—then you feel more peaceful and fulfilled.
.
.
You may have experienced this under a starry night sky, at the edge of the sea, or when your child was born.
.
.
Paradoxically, the less your “I” is here, the happier you are.
.
.
.

Sense of Self”: … .. Donald Altman. “The Mindfulness Code.”

image
.
.
.
“Whether you call it the ego (as Freud did), the pain body (as Eckhart Tolle does), or the self (as Buddhists continue to), there is a part of human awareness whose job it is to create a sense of self that is distinct and separate from others.
.
.
The human brain, after all, is designed to construct an identity.
.
.
Various areas of the brain are implicated in this capacity to create a solid self.
.
.
The brain’s left hemisphere is especially good at this making mental road maps and cobbling together stories about our lives.
.
.
It does the heavy lifting in supporting the concept of self, or I, with which we strongly identify.
.
.
Harvard-trained neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor describes the direct experience of losing this individuated self because of a hemorrhage in her brain’s left hemisphere in her book My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey.
.
.
The experience helped her understand what happens when the left brain’s divisive, me-first sense of I stops totally dominating one’s reality.
.
.
According to Taylor, left-brain dominance produces “extremely rigid thinking patterns that are analytically critical (extreme left brain).
.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: