Posts Tagged ‘Doubt’

From “Buddhism Now” blog

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Question: What can I do about doubts? Some days I’m plagued with doubts about the practice or my own progress, or the teacher.

 

 

Answer: Doubting is natural. Everyone starts out with doubts. You can learn a great deal from them.

 

What is important is that you don’t identify with your doubts: that is, don’t get caught up in them.

 

This will spin your mind in endless circles.

 

 

Instead, watch the whole process of doubting, of wondering. See who it is that doubts. See how doubts come and go.

 

 

Then you will no longer be victimised by your doubts.

 

 

You will step outside of them and your mind will be quiet.

 

 

You can see how all things come and go.

 

 

Just let go of what you are attached to.

 

Let go of your doubts and simply watch.

 

 

This is how to end doubting.
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Shaila Catherine: Doubt,,,, A judgment!

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“It is imperative for the sincere meditator to unwaveringly witness the functions of desire, aversion, restlessness, and doubt, witness these forces arising—but without acting them out, without buying into them.
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See them arise as empty thoughts, and see them pass just as quickly.
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If they are not seen clearly, these mental states can obstruct progress in concentration.
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Doubt can assail the mind with indecision, worry, or chronic judgment. Unabated, the momentum of uncertainty can paralyze spiritual progress.
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Yet doubt is nothing more than a thought.
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Through examining the experience of doubt, you will come to understand doubt, rather than be consumed by it.
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Doubt is a category of thought that you can definitively set aside.
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The very instant you realize you are thinking you have an opportunity to affect the patterns of mind.
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Thoughts of self can clutter attention with a plethora of diversified tales—preventing composure, stillness, and unification.
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Concentration abandons this diffusing activity.
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When you clearly perceive a thought, natural disinterest replaces identification with the stories.
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As the mind calms, mental seclusion is established.”
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