Posts Tagged ‘depression’

“The origins of and mechanism behind social anxiety”

 

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Excerpts from Darius Cikanavicius, Author, Certified Coach:
For the most part, social anxiety develops as an adaptation to stressful and hurtful social childhood environments.

 

When a child is small, their whole world consists of their primary caregivers (mother, father, family members, other authority figures). This world slowly expands as they get older, but how people understand social interactions is set. In other words, the examples we are exposed to as children creates blueprints for our future relationships.
Sadly, most if not all of us are traumatized as children to one degree or another. The degree to which we were hurt is the degree to which we will have interpersonal problems. One of the most common interpersonal problems is, indeed, social anxiety.

 

 

Hurt and mistreated children grow up into adults who feel disappointed, distrustful, overly trustful, bitter, angry, clingy, stressed, numb, or emotionally unavailable in relationships and interactions with others.
They have been programmed to feel like that by how they were treated when they were small, helpless, impressionable, and dependent. Back then, acceptance and validation were vital.

 

 

As I write in the book Human Development and Trauma:

“Childhood trauma leads children to become more afraid of the world. When a child’s first and most important bonds are unstable, it is natural and expected that in adulthood they will transfer this lack of a sense of safety and security onto others.”

 

 

Unresolved pain that stems from early relationships can haunt us for the rest of our lives. Early hurt and pain can program us to feel and believe that, generally, people are dangerous. They will hurt us, laugh at us, use and abuse us, punish us, hate us, want us dead, or even kill us.

 

 

It can be understood as a form of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD or C-PTSD) where the trigger is people and social situations because in the past they were a great source of pain.

 

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Buddhism and Western medicine: a good read

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Author:

Alex Lickerman, MD, is a physician and former director of primary care at one of the world’s most prestigious universities, the University of Chicago. He is also a practicing Nichiren Buddhist and leader in the Nichiren Buddhist lay organization, the Soka Gakkai International, USA (SGI-USA).

 

Buddhism and Western medicine would seem an incongruous mixture, but in the hands of Alex Lickerman they meld seamlessly into a recipe for overcoming life’s hardships—indeed, for turning them into advantages. An accomplished physician, Lickerman has no truck for the supernatural, but recognizes that the tenets of Nichiren Buddhism have been honed over centuries to help alleviate life’s inevitable sufferings. The Undefeated Mind is a deeply engaging story of how Lickerman has fused modern medicine with ancient wisdom to heal his patients both physically and psychologically—lessons that apply to all of us.”
–Jerry Coyne, professor of Ecology and Evolution at University of Chicago

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Study links depression to low blood levels of acetyl-L-carnitine

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Investigators at Stanford and elsewhere have shown, for the first time in humans, that low blood levels of acetyl-L-carnitine track with the severity and duration of depression.

 

JUL 30 2018
Natalie Rasgon

People with depression have low blood levels of a substance called acetyl-L-carnitine, according to a Stanford University School of Medicine scientist and her collaborators in a multicenter study.

Naturally produced in the body, acetyl-L-carnitine is also widely available in drugstores, supermarkets and health food catalogs as a nutritional supplement. People with severe or treatment-resistant depression, or whose bouts of depression began earlier in life, have particularly low blood levels of the substance.

 

The findings, published online July 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, build on extensive animal research. They mark the first rigorous indication that the link between acetyl-L-carnitine levels and depression may apply to people, too. And they point the way to a new class of antidepressants that could be freer of side effects and faster-acting than those in use today, and that may help patients for whom existing treatments don’t work or have stopped working.

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we believe that thinking will resolve things, but the mind doesn’t know when to quit.”

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“The Need to Please”:

“The mind is always evaluating, analyzing, and worrying. For example, we constantly analyze what others think about us and expect from us, what we should do in response, and what will happen if we don’t comply.

In addition, our thinking involves nearly constant appraisal of our experience and how we’re doing.

We evaluate unpleasant and painful experiences so that we can avoid them, and we try to plan how we can maximize pleasant experiences.

For the most part, we believe that thinking will resolve things, but the mind doesn’t know when to quit.”
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My two cents: Think of these doors as thoughts, judgments with strong emotion.

 


We can spend all day inspecting, evaluating or judging what lies behind each door.

 


This is destructive, wastes our life force and leads to suffering.

 

 

Our goal is to leave these doors alone, trade them in for this present moment.

 

 

Tragedy and loss await you behind every door.

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Opioid lawsuit targets rich family behind drug that fueled US crisis Sackler family, which owns Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, accused of fueling addiction while boosting profits

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The Guardian:
Joanna Walters and agencies
Tue 12 Jun 2018

 

The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.
The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.

 

The state of Massachusetts on Tuesday sued the maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, which has been blamed for spawning America’s opioids crisis, naming leading executives and members of the multibillionaire Sackler family that owns the pharmaceutical company.

The lawsuit accuses the company, Purdue Pharma, of spinning a “web of illegal deceit” to fuel the deadly drug abuse crisis while boosting profits.

Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died
Maura Healey, state attorney general
Purdue Pharma is already defending lawsuits from several states and local governments, but Massachusetts is the first state to take the unusual step of personally naming the company’s executives in a complaint, the state attorney general, Maura Healey, said. It names 16 current and former executives and board members, including the chief executive, Craig Landau, and eight members across three generations of the Sackler family that wholly owns Purdue.

The lawsuit alleges Purdue deceived patients and doctors about the risks of opioids, pushed prescribers to keep patients on the drugs longer and aggressively targeted vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and veterans.

“Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died,” Healey said on Tuesday.

Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, issued a statement saying it vigorously denied all the allegations and looked forward to presenting “substantial defenses” to the claims in the lawsuit.

“We share the attorney general’s concern about the opioid crisis. We are disappointed, however, that in the midst of good faith negotiations with many states, the commonwealth [of Massachusetts] has decided to pursue a costly and protracted litigation process. We will continue to work collaboratively with the states toward bringing meaningful solutions,” it stated.

Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.
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Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.

 

Purdue, along with some other painkiller makers and drug distributors, is currently facing more than 300 lawsuits from city and county authorities across the country. The lawsuits have been corralled into one multi-district case in a federal court in Ohio. The judge in that case has been pushing for a huge, quick settlement to compensate victims and assist in what the government has admitted is a public health crisis, in the way the so-called “Big Tobacco settlement” happened against cigarette companies in the 1990s. But some experts are calling for the case to go to trial in order to oblige the pharmaceutical companies to produce more evidence in the discovery process.

 

 

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New York Post: Americans are more depressed and miserable than ever!

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There’s nothing here to smile about.

 

For the first time on record, there was not a single state in America that saw an improvement in its residents’ levels of overall well-being, according to data released Tuesday from Gallup and digital health company Sharecare, which included 160,000 interviews from residents of all 50 states. Well-being — which measures everything from mental, physical and financial health to having solid relationships and a sense of purpose in your life — is a way of looking at the quality of Americans lives.

 

Furthermore, “the 21 US states that saw their wellbeing drop in 2017 shattered the previous record set in 2009 amidst the Great Recession when 15 states had lower well-being than the year before,” note Gallup and Sharecare, which began looking into well-being in 2008. This is “particularly notable given that Americans’ confidence in the economy and perceptions of the job market are substantially better in 2017 than they were in 2009.”

 

One thing that is driving down our well-being is our declining mental and emotional health, says Dan Witters, research director of the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index.

 

“It’s an unprecedented worsening … This is nothing like we have ever seen before,” he says.

 

Indeed, depression levels are “the highest we have ever measured,” says Witters. In 2017, nearly one in five (18 percent) of Americans said they had been professionally diagnosed at some point as being depressed. And the numbers of people who said they had recently found little interest or pleasure in doing things increased seven percentage points from the year prior, meaning that 17 million more people now say this. Plus our quality of relationship closeness has worsened.

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A viewer asks: What does this practice entail and what is the ultimate benefit?

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This practice entails a simple, concrete, immediate, and passionate focus on our breath, a repetitive learned skill, a safe way of training the mind.

 

 

It is a very simple, very powerful, mundane looking, daily practice. We need to invest a minimum 20 minutes a day of calm but intense focus practice.

 

 

It is a repetitive practice that builds focus starting with the mastery of one breath. It starts slow and has no time-table or goals.

 

 

I recommend working on one breath, then pause and evaluate. If you start trying to Meditate for ten minute or longer, you will get lost in thought and become frustrated.

 

 

Meditation unfolds best at its own pace without our judgments or bias. No goals, let your journey be thought free, give it a chance to blossom, trust it fully.

 

 

The whole practice is based on one breath, a reason so many overlook simple as weak.

 

 

This practice entails the simplest, easiest and quickest way to heal disorders, to find calm, peace of mind and eventually happiness.

 

 

It is an internal investigation of discovery into our nervous system and inner world.

 

 

We become friends first with our nervous system, as the breath activates our parasympathetic nervous system, the brakes, slowing our mind to focus and be at its most powerful.

 

 

We are most powerful, most capable of extraordinary accomplishment, true happiness or access to our joyful emotions when the mind is empty and totally present.

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