Posts Tagged ‘chronic pain’

Opioid lawsuit targets rich family behind drug that fueled US crisis Sackler family, which owns Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, accused of fueling addiction while boosting profits

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The Guardian:
Joanna Walters and agencies
Tue 12 Jun 2018

 

The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.
The prescription painkiller OxyContin at a pharmacy. The lawsuit takes the unusual step of personally naming the company executives.

 

The state of Massachusetts on Tuesday sued the maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, which has been blamed for spawning America’s opioids crisis, naming leading executives and members of the multibillionaire Sackler family that owns the pharmaceutical company.

The lawsuit accuses the company, Purdue Pharma, of spinning a “web of illegal deceit” to fuel the deadly drug abuse crisis while boosting profits.

Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died
Maura Healey, state attorney general
Purdue Pharma is already defending lawsuits from several states and local governments, but Massachusetts is the first state to take the unusual step of personally naming the company’s executives in a complaint, the state attorney general, Maura Healey, said. It names 16 current and former executives and board members, including the chief executive, Craig Landau, and eight members across three generations of the Sackler family that wholly owns Purdue.

The lawsuit alleges Purdue deceived patients and doctors about the risks of opioids, pushed prescribers to keep patients on the drugs longer and aggressively targeted vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and veterans.

“Their strategy was simple: the more drugs they sold, the more money they made, and the more people died,” Healey said on Tuesday.

Purdue, based in Stamford, Connecticut, issued a statement saying it vigorously denied all the allegations and looked forward to presenting “substantial defenses” to the claims in the lawsuit.

“We share the attorney general’s concern about the opioid crisis. We are disappointed, however, that in the midst of good faith negotiations with many states, the commonwealth [of Massachusetts] has decided to pursue a costly and protracted litigation process. We will continue to work collaboratively with the states toward bringing meaningful solutions,” it stated.

Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.
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Maura Healey, the Massachusetts attorney general, has sued the maker of OxyContin over the deadly opioid crisis.

 

Purdue, along with some other painkiller makers and drug distributors, is currently facing more than 300 lawsuits from city and county authorities across the country. The lawsuits have been corralled into one multi-district case in a federal court in Ohio. The judge in that case has been pushing for a huge, quick settlement to compensate victims and assist in what the government has admitted is a public health crisis, in the way the so-called “Big Tobacco settlement” happened against cigarette companies in the 1990s. But some experts are calling for the case to go to trial in order to oblige the pharmaceutical companies to produce more evidence in the discovery process.

 

 

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THE PAIN PARADOX from “Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness”. Part 2

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Yet doctors were also open to the idea. Each of them had patients they couldn’t cure and who were resistant to conventional treatment approaches. Doctors and their patients had little to lose.

 

The first MBSR studies thus began with those who were suffering from chronic pain.

 

Kabat-Zinn wanted to see whether they could mobilize their own internal responses to the suffering they were experiencing.

 

 

We invited them, paradoxically,” he said, “to put the welcome mat out for whatever sensations they were experiencing,

 

 

just to see if they could attend to them moment by moment and ‘befriend’ the actuality of their experience, even briefly.”

 

 

The results were successful. Patients found that their relationship to pain shifted positively when they practiced mindfulness.

 

At times, their pain even disappeared.

 

 

Patients also reported discovering that the vexing sensations that lived inside them were transient and shifting.

 

Rather than being constant throughout their day, the pain was shifting over time—a huge realization for those who felt perpetually burdened by their bodies.

 

 

Mindfulness was helping people relate to their pain differently.

 

 

For some, it was even opening a door to a freedom they had forgotten or had previously not known.
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THE PAIN PARADOX from “Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness”. Part 1

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There is one more idea in Buddhism and MBSR that shapes our orientation to mindfulness: the notion that our avoidance of suffering can exacerbate it.

 

Mindfulness experts John Briere and Catherine Scott referred to this as the pain paradox—the observation that our natural tendency to escape, deny, or withdraw from pain only intensifies and prolongs the distress.

 

 

What we resist, the saying goes, persists.

 

 

This paradox was key to Kabat-Zinn’s introduction of MBSR to the medical community.

 

When he originally approached doctors with the idea of having patients meditate, Kabat-Zinn was advocating for a fundamentally different approach to suffering—one that lay at the heart of the Buddhist tradition he’d trained in.

 

From the perspective of mindfulness,” he wrote, “nothing needs fixing.

 

Nothing needs to be forced to stop, or change, or go away.”

 

 Perhaps not surprisingly, this idea raised eyebrows.

 

Western medicine was built largely on helping alleviate people’s pain, offering interventions such as medication or surgery.

 

Mindfulness ran completely counter to this paradigm. How could paying closer attention to one’s pain alleviate it?

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A jock prepares to battle PTSD, it is a game, life that is!.

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I have evaluated C-PTSD from a jocks point of view, evaluated it as an opponent, explored its strengths, and discovered it’s weakness.
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If we were game planning, preparing for a contest against PTSD, daily practice would be similar to a professional baseball hitter or a pure shooter in basketball, ,,,,,”Repetition”……
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In spring training, we would hit baseballs in the batting cages until we blistered, bled, then sprayed them with tuff skin so they would callous over. We were set for another season after this yearly ritual.
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Hitting in time moved from a conscience skill to inhabit the body, fluidly unfolding when needed without thought. I could damn near hit with my eyes closed, it became so ingrained in my habitual practice. I had swung a baseball bat a zillion times in a hitting environment.
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Thought would destroy what I had built. So I would empty my mind before I would enter the batters box, another level of consciousness took over. Exactly how we tame PTSD.
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This is what 10 breaths will be for us. We will develop 10 breaths, 10 cycles of inhale, pause, exhale, pause, lasting 10 to 15 seconds a piece, two minutes total, of slow focused “bulletproof”, breaths.
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In two focused minutes, traumas story line fades, thought disintegrates and PTSD gives way to this present moment.
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Our game plan attacks trauma, our opponent where he is weakest, most vulnerable, a trigger exploding.
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We are developing ten solid breaths while we visually explore our environment, listening intently to all sounds, engaging all senses and repeating affirmations if needed.
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Manually we trace our breath on the breathing track, inhale 4 plus seconds, pause 2 plus seconds, exhale 4 plus seconds, puase 2 plus seconds.
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We do not have to meditate during this stressful explosion, just focus and stay present for two minutes.
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We prepare as a jock during practice, under calm conditions for game time performance.
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We are heading towards trauma, not fleeing, in time we will hunt him/her down with our ten breath weapon.
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Now,,,, Now!!!!!!!

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“Falling from a Star”
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If I could impart one word describing happiness and healing, only one, it would be “Now”.
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Now is the only moment where healing and happiness are joined as twins.
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Now is the only time, I can take a breath, filling life’s immediate need for oxygen, being alive.
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Now, each breath is precious, I strive with maximum effort to stay right here without distractions of doubt and worry.
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Now is the only time I can let go of my fears and take action, real action.
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Now, is when I experience happiness.
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How about you?
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One last thought.
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Happiness abounds when now is combined with giving!!!
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Joy versus Happy part two:: a little long but what a resource!

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“Falling from a Star”
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“The word joy is equally vague, since, as the psychologist Paul Ekman has shown, it is associated with feelings as varied as the pleasures of the five senses:
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amusement (from the the chuckle to the belly laugh);
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contentment (a calmer kind of satisfaction);
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excitement (in response to novelty or challenge);
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relief (following upon another emotion, such as fear, anxiety, and sometimes even pleasure);
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wonder (before something astonishing and admirable,
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or that surpasses understanding);
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ecstasy or bliss (transporting us outside ourselves);
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exultation (at having accomplished a difficult task or undertaken a daring exploit);
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radiant pride (when our children earn a special honor);
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elevation (from having witnessed an act of great kindness,
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generosity, or compassion);
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gratitude (the appreciation of a selfless act of which one is the beneficiary);
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and unhealthy jubilation, schadenfreude (in relishing someone else’s suffering, such as through revenge).
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We might also throw in rejoicing (in someone else’s happiness),
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delight or enchantment (a shining kind of contentment),
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and spiritual radiance (a serene joy born from deep well-being and benevolence),
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which is indeed more an enduring state of being than a fleeting emotion.
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Chronic pain: rewritten as a resource for the top of blog page…

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things i never heard from my pain specialists.. doctors and pain psychologists/// Why????
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chronic pain differs from acute pain; that unlike acute pain, chronic pain doesn’t represent harm.
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Pain has to go through the mind: the anterior cingulate cortex, which registers pain’s unpleasant character.”
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simply becoming mindful of one’s emotional response to pain decreases its unpleasantness and improves functioning, and because meditation had been shown to reduce the unpleasantness of acute pain by almost 60 percent (making meditation by some measures superior even to morphine)
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Research shows, for example, that how we interpret the meaning of pain has a dramatic impact on our ability to tolerate it.
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No one ever told me, throwing away my opioids, undertaking intense aerobic exercise till exhaustion would transform my pain.
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No one informed me that any attention I gave my pain would increase it.
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No one ever imagined pain could be impacted, diminished, changed, and altered for me.
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After the operations, nerve killings and meds, after the doctors handed my body back over to me, I was left with enough pain to ruin my existence.
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My pain has changed from dominating my life with suffering to an annoyance (I do not suffer now).
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Bringing my pain out to play while exercising, altered my relationship with it. Now I know that this change happened in the anterior cingulate cortex area of the brain.
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Aerobic exercise, meditation and attitude can devour a big portion of your suffering/
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