Posts Tagged ‘C-PTSD’

Dissolve your problems: “Breath to Breath”

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If you’ve sat with the breath for even a few minutes, you’ve seen that this practice is an open invitation for everything inside you to come up.

 

You see your wild mind, which we all have, and which can be quite overwhelming at first. 

 

It has been there all along, of course, but this concentration has brought it into relief.

 

The ultimate goal—though this is no easy thing and takes time to develop—is to allow everything to come up, with all its energy: 

 

all of, for instance, your anger and loneliness and despair, to allow these things to arise and be transformed by the light of awareness. 

 

There is tremendous energy in these states, and much of the time we suppress them, so that we not only lose all the energy that is in them but also expend a great deal keeping them down. 

 

What we gradually learn is to let these things come up and be transformed, to release their energy. 

 

You don’t solve your problems in this practice, it is sometimes said, you dissolve them. 

 

But the wild mind that we all confront when we start discourages many practitioners. 

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Can the mind steady with Practice?

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Know that with practice there comes a time when the mind steadies,

 

relaxes,

 

and concentration becomes undivided.

 

Buddha

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My two cents:  Meditation/Mindfulness is an accumulative practice.

 

The more you practice, the better your focus and benefits becomes.

 

It takes daily action for a period of time to see the mind steady, relax and focus.

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Surrender: a great tool for healing, wellbeing (Happiness)

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Healing was incremental for me, each plateau reached through concerted action over months. Nothing came easy or quick.


Complex PTSD from a childhood does not heal miraculously, quickly or easily. The mind was not fully developed when trauma entered its world. Hard to tell what is normal and what is the aftermath of abuse.


Aerobic exercise, therapy, reading, meditating, practicing acceptance, applying mindfulness and persistence each brought benefits for me. Sometimes all hope seemed lost but something inside refused to give up.


This trait is very important. Lots of setbacks, even perceived losses on this journey. That inner guide can be our savior in our low moments.


Meditating and mindfulness carved out a small secure space for me to survive. This space grew incrementally as I healed.


It was like climbing a ladder, each successive rung revealed more of the horizon, more of the path.


Acceptance was difficult, releasing the shame and guilt reached a sticking point. My fear, worry and confusion kept me paralyzed for months.


I still had resistance, actually I was terrified, enforced with cortisol by my fight or flight mechanism exploding. The drugs are real, the storyline is the mirage.


Being vulnerable, that is surrendering completely in the face of my trauma, broke the traffic jam. It was scary not to resist, to be so vulnerable, so defenseless.


With arms outstretched, totally open, I pictured my heart as a butterfly net.


I had found the next step, being vulnerable, surrendering to my fears.

 

This exposed my fears so I could observe them.


Try surrendering the next time you meditate.
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Anger: part two, 2

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The prefrontal cortex shuts down when we are angry. Anger then, should be used only when a real threat is present.


Anger is jet fuel for trauma (PTSD) and other anxiety disorders.


Get real angry and watch your hypervigilance, panic attacks, avoidance and dissociation increase to frightening levels. Watch your fight of flight mechanism fire with full force when you are angry.


We fear being vulnerable. Anger feels powerful, vulnerable does not.

 

Guess which one is better for us?


Expressing our anger is a choice.


In the right circumstance anger can save our life or people around us.


Most of the time our anger is connected to feelings of being hurt, marginalized, overlooked, targeted, mistreated or vulnerable. Anger isn’t just an emotion, it’s a constellation of emotions.


I have explored my anger, followed it back to my childhood abuse. Anger remained stuck in my childhood and scared the hell out of me.


Mastery of emotions is beyond my skill level, however I express my anger very rarely now.


Where I place my attention each day decides my attitude, my fate.
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This emotion is different: Anger; part one

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5 Ways Anger is Not Like Other Emotions By Jonice Webb PhD ~

 

“Anger is not just any old emotion. It’s special.

In fact, it’s so special that a 2017 survey by the Mental Health Foundation of 2000 people found that 28% are sometimes worried about the level of anger that they feel.

First, let’s outline what makes anger different from other emotions, and then we’ll talk about how you can use this information to become happier and healthier in your life.

5 Ways Anger is Special

 

* It’s Motivating: Anger’s purpose is to push you to protect yourself. Anger gives you energy. It’s activating, and it drives you to engage, not withdraw, as most other emotions do.

 

* It Never Stands Alone: Anger is always a result of feeling something else. You feel hurt, marginalized, overlooked, targeted, mistreated or vulnerable. Anger isn’t just an emotion, it’s a constellation of emotions. There are always layers of feelings underneath it, feeding it.

 

* It Seeks a Target: Other emotions can simply be. Anger cannot. Like an arrow shot from the bow, it looks for a target. This is what makes anger so easy to misdirect. It may erupt at the wrong person, in the wrong way and at the wrong time so very easily.

 

* It Can Be Turned Inward or Outward: Sometimes directing our anger at its true target can be acutely uncomfortable, and sometimes we aren’t aware of the true target. This is when we are at risk for turning our anger inward, directing it at ourselves.

 

* It’s Capable of Damaging Your Health: Research has shown that anger prone individuals and people who express their anger as rage are more at risk for heart attacks and cancer.

Anger is a powerful, protective, complex emotion.

Yes, it has potential to do great damage.

But used properly, it also has potential to help you mightily.“
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PTSD and Civil War Veterans


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Veterans of the Civil War were perhaps the first to draw attention to the possible psychological consequences of combat. At the time, veterans with psychological problems, including criminality, alcoholism and addiction, violent behavior, and suicide were attributed to “nervous trouble”, “nostalgia”, “soldier’s heart”, and other vaguely defined conditions which are now known as post-traumatic stress disorder.

 

In this work, the authors, respectively the Senior Fellow and the Chairman of the Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, devoted to the advancement of persons with disabilities, examine the effects of the war on a sampling of Union veterans, both black and white, with particular attention to the suicides now recognized as a frequent result of PTSD.

 

Their results, bolstered by an impressive mass of statistics, indicate that veterans had a notably higher suicide rate than men in the same social cohorts who had not served. Moreover, men who had been injured in combat or who had undergone the ordeal of being prisoners of war were even more likely to commit suicide than veterans who had been wounded or imprisoned.

 

While they uncovered these grim statistics, Logue and Blanck also found that veterans were more likely to be unmarried or have marital problems, more frequently suffered insanity commitments, and even were relatively less wealthy than non-veterans, though oddly African-American veterans appear to have been somewhat more prosperous than black non-veterans.

 

Heavy Laden, a volume in the “Cambridge Disability Law and Policy Series”, is an important read for students of veterans affairs, throwing fresh light on the problems that still affect those who served.
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Kindness by MARK TWAIN

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Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.

 

— MARK TWAIN

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Kindness starts within, fills the host, then flows outward.

 

Surround yourself with loving kindness, bathe in it’s soothing warmth.

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