Posts Tagged ‘C-PTSD’

Abusive childhoods have a big, nasty inner Critic!!!!!!

47591FF0-09C7-4702-97A8-FDD8A17E3F56

.

.
.
Bring your inner critic out before you sit (Meditate).

 

 

Listen to the criticism, hear without grasping, feel without internalizing.

 

 

Hug your inner critic, he/she is just trying to protect us, he/she believes.

 

 

Let the storyline alone, envision inner peace filling your lungs, soothing the inner critic.

 

 

We are not destroying the inner critic, we are engulfing him/her in an approval bath.

 

 

Soothe your inner critic with inner peace, approval and acceptance.

 

 

Put your hand over your body part that identifies with your inner critic (solar plexus, stomach, throat, or between the shoulder blades).

 

 

You are fine, secure, safe and perfect.

 

 

My inner critic has the angry, emotional voice of my father.

 

 

I understand his judgment was not accurate, kind or humane.

 

 

In this moment, right now, I bathe in inner peace and acceptance.

 

 

No dialogue or thought is involved in this specific practice.
.
.
.

Insight

DB08C388-9717-40BD-BCA3-FAD49E9360EF

.

.

It is only with the heart that one can see rightly:

 

what is essential is invisible to the eye.

 

– Antoine de Saint Exupery –

– .

– .

– .

Our search for wisdom should start with ourself first,  discovering our inner world, our nervous system, our vulnerabilities and our strengths.

 

Close your eyes, focus intently on the breath, observe all sensations of the body without commentary or judgment.

 

It is hard to release our cognitive bias and free ourself.

.

.

 

THE PAIN PARADOX from “Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness”. Part 2

A23844CC-6DC4-44E4-8ABD-24E28AC5C93B

.
.
Yet doctors were also open to the idea. Each of them had patients they couldn’t cure and who were resistant to conventional treatment approaches. Doctors and their patients had little to lose.

 

The first MBSR studies thus began with those who were suffering from chronic pain.

 

Kabat-Zinn wanted to see whether they could mobilize their own internal responses to the suffering they were experiencing.

 

 

We invited them, paradoxically,” he said, “to put the welcome mat out for whatever sensations they were experiencing,

 

 

just to see if they could attend to them moment by moment and ‘befriend’ the actuality of their experience, even briefly.”

 

 

The results were successful. Patients found that their relationship to pain shifted positively when they practiced mindfulness.

 

At times, their pain even disappeared.

 

 

Patients also reported discovering that the vexing sensations that lived inside them were transient and shifting.

 

Rather than being constant throughout their day, the pain was shifting over time—a huge realization for those who felt perpetually burdened by their bodies.

 

 

Mindfulness was helping people relate to their pain differently.

 

 

For some, it was even opening a door to a freedom they had forgotten or had previously not known.
.
.
.

THE PAIN PARADOX from “Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness”. Part 1

6AED47A3-A91F-45F2-9B38-9CF55C710AC1.
.
There is one more idea in Buddhism and MBSR that shapes our orientation to mindfulness: the notion that our avoidance of suffering can exacerbate it.

 

Mindfulness experts John Briere and Catherine Scott referred to this as the pain paradox—the observation that our natural tendency to escape, deny, or withdraw from pain only intensifies and prolongs the distress.

 

 

What we resist, the saying goes, persists.

 

 

This paradox was key to Kabat-Zinn’s introduction of MBSR to the medical community.

 

When he originally approached doctors with the idea of having patients meditate, Kabat-Zinn was advocating for a fundamentally different approach to suffering—one that lay at the heart of the Buddhist tradition he’d trained in.

 

From the perspective of mindfulness,” he wrote, “nothing needs fixing.

 

Nothing needs to be forced to stop, or change, or go away.”

 

 Perhaps not surprisingly, this idea raised eyebrows.

 

Western medicine was built largely on helping alleviate people’s pain, offering interventions such as medication or surgery.

 

Mindfulness ran completely counter to this paradigm. How could paying closer attention to one’s pain alleviate it?

.

.

 

Please stay on the Trail: Thoughts have enormous power

A35996AF-80CC-4FA2-87FC-FE9DA214FA75

.
.
The trail most seasoned meditators take,   refrains from swimming in the dangerous water (thoughts).

 

Bring awareness to the pattern of your thoughts.

 

Left unattended, thoughts collect emotions, empowering both with energy and duration.

 

How many hours do you spend lost in thought patterns?

 

Inside our default mode, some of those 60,000 daily thoughts are repetitive, unhealthy and self-centered.

 

 

Our meditation/mindfulness practice, our goal is to do the opposite.

 

 

We want as little thought and “Ego” as possible during the day.

 

 

We want to direct our thoughts when needed, acting as a gatekeeper to cut off any rumination.

 

Thought is where the war of PTSD, depression, anxiety and many other disorders are fought.

 

Pay attention to the patterns of your mind.

 

 

I found that during the morning shower my mind would scan the activity planned for the day.

 

 

Do we look forward to the day, look for ways to navigate the land mines, or do we see doom and gloom.

 

 

This is a choice, the way we perceive life, opportunity or doom and gloom.

 

 

Only entertain positive thoughts, let the unworthy, negative ones fade.

.
.

The Rollercoaster ride of PTSD! My crazy Path! Part 2!

5D421E87-FCFB-4FCF-B51E-D12553297625

.
.
This trigger felt much worse than it actually turned out. I perceived danger, confusion, fear and anxiety. My Trauma thoughts always  catastrophizethe the event. What if this happens continually, I will suffer for the rest of my life!

 

 

Trauma is a huge bluff!!! BLUFF, BLUFF, BLUFF, BLUFF.

 

Besides our fight or flight mechanism firing, bp, heart rate and respiration rising along with loss of fine motor skills, nothing happens. My fight or flight mechanism is dormant when a trigger fires now. This is what we consider fear, the feeling of being afraid is linked to this mechanism. It prepares us for a lethal threat.

 

PTSD has stolen the code, the switch which initiates a trigger, spreading anxiety and fear, flooding our system with cortisol. It is memories of past danger that is the culprit. I know I am safe when a trigger erupts now. More important my body knows it from my exploration of my inner world.

 

That is one of the goals of a meditation practice.

 

When we dissociate, get lost in trauma thought, the default mode kicks in. We become focused on “I”, me, mine, their unworthiness, suffering and helplessness. Trauma is fueled continually in this default mode.

 

Playing defense helps me tremendously. I do not ruminate or grasp these thoughts. They are left alone to fade from consciousness. It is like a tug of war. Grab that rope even with one hand and the rest of your body is a prisoner.

 

My answer to this trigger was first to ignore the intrusive, negative, unworthy thoughts. Next I focus on my breath, my model, and brought approval and inner peace to the anxious feelings in my solar plexus.

 

Next, I meditated in half hour sets in the morning and night, bringing security and inner peace to my inner world. That soothed me and allowed me to use exposure therapy. I went back to similar spots where I was triggered.

 

This calmed the catastrophizing thoughts.

 

Now, a day later I am much better. Focused and more centered. It is not the end of the war but I won this battle.

 

You can also. Build your tools while things are calm.
.
.

 

Updated: This is What we Hook up to, When we practice the Breathing Track or Mindfulness or Meditation!

Bouncing Back”– Rewriting your Brain for Maximum Resilience: Linda Graham
.
.
“Left hemisphere: Verbal processing: Language, Speech, Symbols
.
Right Hemisphere: nonverbal processing: visual images, body movements, emotions, experiences in relationship
.
.
Left hemisphere: linear processing (one bit of data after another in sequence)
.
Right hemisphere: holistic processing (seeing the big picture)
.
.
Left hemisphere: logical, rational processing: abstract reasoning and analysis, cause and effect.
.
Right hemisphere: emotional processing, including processing of facial expressions in fusiform gurus,
.
.
Left hemisphere: Sense of social and emotional self”
.
.

.

Jill Bolte Taylor is a neuroanatomist who suffered a stroke that shut down her left hemisphere.    The right side of brain is massive.

%d bloggers like this: