Posts Tagged ‘breath’

We heal by not ____________

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We heal by NOT thinking about our Trauma!
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We heal by NOT reacting to our Trauma.
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Dissociating is the king of our sysmptoms, thinking about past abuse or future danger dominates life.
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Healing happens when we do not react to our fight or flight mechanism.
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Healing happens when we can stay focused and present, when PTSD or Anxiety ignites our nervous system.
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The quickest way is using Meditation/Mindfulness to focus and integrate calmly and confidently.
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When we become friends with our nervous system, triggers exploding like volcanos become cap pistols.
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Explore your inner world, get to know you.
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Nothing to accomplish, nothing to fight or conquer, perfection is already inside.
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Not identifying with the Thinker: The Heart of Meditation

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“The third kind of detachment is subtler. . .

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It involves letting go of our attachment to being the thinker,

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the one who identifies with the thoughts and desires, . .

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the one, in fact, who constantly, if unconsciously, chooses to think. . .

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Instead we identify ourselves with the witness,

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the watcher of thoughts. . .

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We don’t try to cast out thoughts. . .

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We let them be there,

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but we pull back from them. . .

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We identify with the one

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who watches the thoughts”. . .

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My two cents:  We pull back from our ego, allowing the watcher, the witness, our true self, our intuition to lead.

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The Thinker needs to be top Banana , pun intended.

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. . Want to change your life drastically with the least amount of effort and time?

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Spend 15 minutes a day perfecting a very specific way of focusing on the breath.
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It takes a very specific, intense focus, maybe using multiple senses.
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Our goal is to allow the mind to empty.
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The mind and body repair and energize when focused and empty!
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This ability to let thought and emotional judgment pass on through changes life drastically.
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Changes the immune system, digestive system, nervous system, plus our emotional regulation.
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The mind is trained best with simple, concrete, immediate, and repetitive actions.
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Sit today, practice, fight for your wellbeing, focus like your life depended on it.
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Your emotional wellbeing does!
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As the picture says, this path can be rough going, surrendering to our fears.

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Letting go is an art form

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Learning to let go
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should be learned
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before learning to get.
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Life should be touched,
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not strangled.
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You’ve got to relax,
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let it happen at times,
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and at others
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move forward with it.”
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― Ray Bradbury
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The Trap of Self-Improvement

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In the healing work of self-compassion, it’s important to avoid the trap of getting caught up in self-improvement.
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When you have a pervasive sense of unworthiness, this can be tricky.
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The identity of unworthiness is formed of self-blame and a deluge of self-judgments offered by an inner critic who wants nothing to do with self-compassion.
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It’s far more interested in masochistic endeavors like self-improvement projects that it’s never satisfied with.
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But this just gets you more stuck in feeling deficient for several reasons, the foremost being the very idea that there’s a faulty and unworthy self that needs to be improved.
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As discussed, Buddhist psychology asserts that the very concept of a static and enduring self is the most profound of delusions and the source of endless suffering.
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Believing that you can fix the unworthy self just leaves you trapped in the never-ending pursuit of being “good enough” through better workshops, new therapies, or a better diet or exercise program.
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In many ways it’s no different from always striving for more money or more things.
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It’s just another variation on eternally wanting something more or better.
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Linda Graham: Bouncing Back

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“We can begin cultivating this mindfulness by focusing our attention on one specific object of awareness — in Eastern wisdom traditions, usually the breath.
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Research has shown that even this introductory level of mindfulness practice can increase the cell volume of the anterior cingulate cortex (the brain structure that focuses our attention) and other associated brain structures.
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That makes sense; the more we use any structures of the cortex, the more they can grow new cells.
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Studies show that violinists who have mastered rapid fingering in the left hand have greater cell volume in the area of the motor cortex responsible for that dexterity.
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Taxi drivers in London, who are required to memorize the city’s many circuitous streets and alleyways and then use that information day after day, show a measurable increase in the volume of the area of the brain responsible for directional orientation.
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In the same way that working out our muscles at the gym actually builds them, focusing our attention strengthens the structures that our brain uses to focus that attention.
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This helps us see clearly what’s going on and then see our choices about what to do about what’s going on.
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Research also shows that mindfulness practices, even at this introductory level, increase the volume of the insula and improve its function of interoception — awareness of what’s going on in the body.
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Better interoception strengthens our capacities for self-attunement, self-awareness, and self-empathy: it helps us track how physically comfortable, how emotionally nourished, and how relationally supported we feel.
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This in turn increase the confidence in ourselves that increase resilience.
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We can strengthen the structures in the brain that help us become more present, engaged, and confident in our lives, simply by paying attention to our breathing.”
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Ricard: desire again

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Bright Eye
Photograph by Joe Motohashi, National Geographic Your Shot
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“Everyone would agree that desire is natural and plays an essential role in helping us to realize our aspirations.
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But desire is only a blind force that in itself is neither helpful nor harmful.
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Everything depends on what kind of influence it has over us.
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It is capable of either providing inspiration to our lives or poisoning them.
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It can encourage us to act in a way that is constructive for ourselves and others, but it can also bring about intense pain.
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When desire becomes a possessive and pervasive craving, pain results.
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Desire then forces us to become dependent on the very causes of suffering.
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In that case it is a source of unhappiness, and there is no advantage in continuing to be ruled by it.
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The antidote to a desire that causes suffering is inner freedom.”
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