Posts Tagged ‘breath’

Dissolve your problems: “Breath to Breath”

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If you’ve sat with the breath for even a few minutes, you’ve seen that this practice is an open invitation for everything inside you to come up.

 

You see your wild mind, which we all have, and which can be quite overwhelming at first. 

 

It has been there all along, of course, but this concentration has brought it into relief.

 

The ultimate goal—though this is no easy thing and takes time to develop—is to allow everything to come up, with all its energy: 

 

all of, for instance, your anger and loneliness and despair, to allow these things to arise and be transformed by the light of awareness. 

 

There is tremendous energy in these states, and much of the time we suppress them, so that we not only lose all the energy that is in them but also expend a great deal keeping them down. 

 

What we gradually learn is to let these things come up and be transformed, to release their energy. 

 

You don’t solve your problems in this practice, it is sometimes said, you dissolve them. 

 

But the wild mind that we all confront when we start discourages many practitioners. 

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What is the mind? : “Meditation for the Love of it”

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According to the tantras, the phenomenon we experience as “mind” is actually a particularly vibrant and subtle kind of energy.

 


An ocean of energy, in fact, in which waves of thoughts and emotions arise and subside.


Your thoughts and feelings—the difficult, negative, obsessive ones, as well as the peaceful and clever ones—are all made of the same subtle, invisible, highly dynamic “stuff.”

 

Mindenergy is so evanescent that it can dissolve in a moment, yet so powerful that it can create “stories” that run you for a lifetime.

 


The secret revealed by the tantric sages is that if you can recognize thoughts for what they are—if you can see that a thought is nothing but mind-energy—your thoughts will stop troubling you.

 

That doesn’t mean they’ll stop.

 

But you’ll no longer be at their mercy.
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Definitions:

* Tantra denotes the esoteric traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism that co-developed most likely about the middle of the 1st millennium AD. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable “text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice”.

 

* evanescent
ev·a·nes·cent: adjective
soon passing out of sight, memory, or existence; quickly fading or disappearing

“a shimmering evanescent bubble”
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Pay attention to what you are doing!

 

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How many times did you hear that as a kid?

 

Sounds like “Awareness” practice to me.


Not paying attention, wastes our abilities and chance at wellbeing.

 

Multitasking is another form of not paying attention.

 

We now know multitasking decrease efficiency and accuracy significantly. Also, multitasking eats energy and attitude.

 


I try to pay attention to my mundane tasks, house chores living with my three grandkids.

 

 

Doing laundry is calming at times. My purpose is allow my grandkids to look clean, neat and their best.

 

 

I slow down focus to hang everything properly, then time disappears as I enter this task.

 

 

A chore has changed, time suspended, we are living life as fully as possible in this mundane moment.

 


Then we move to the next moment, hopefully leaving the thoughts about this task behind.

 


Practice on mundane things first, then tackle the awkward and upsetting situations next.

 

 

Perfection is never a goal, being able to come back to now after we get lost will suffice.

 

 

The election is over, how long will you carry your judgments, your thoughts.   Direct thought to a solution, a plan, then come back to the laundry, now.

 

 

Try staying present more, wandering off, doubting, worrying and obsessing less.
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“Perfect Breathing”: Parallel Tracks

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Another interesting aspect of our brains is the interplay between our emotions and thoughts or tasks that require our attention or concentration.

 

 

Researchers at Duke University discovered that the path that “attentional” thoughts (i.e., threading a needle) take through the brain is different than the path that emotional responses take, although both streams have a common destination: the prefrontal cortex.

 

 

This area of the brain is responsible for moderating conflicting thoughts and emotions and determining the correct behavior or course of action.

 

 

Interestingly the Duke researchers determined that there is an inverse relationship between the attentional and emotional path.

 

 

When the emotional path is active and emphasized, the attentional path is deemphasized and dampened, and vice versa.

 

 

This may possibly explain why people under the spell of surging emotions behave irrationally and oftentimes in ways that are clearly not in their best interest or aligned with their beliefs, ethics, or goals—hence the phrase crime of passion.

 

 

However, we can manipulate this inverse relationship to our advantage.

  Continue reading

Perfect Breathing”: Exercise: Foundation Breath

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The purpose of this exercise is to reacquaint your body with full, natural breathing.

 

This simple technique, practiced regularly, will slowly become the norm, changing only in response to stress, tension, and emotions.

 

When your breathing does change you will be immediately aware, and you’ll be able to consciously and objectively deal with the situation, completely aware and present.

 

Sit comfortably with your back straight, eyes closed, and hands in your lap.

 

Begin with an exhale, then inhale deeply, hold it for a second or two, and exhale first with a short burst (like you were blowing out a candle), and then with a long slow finish as you completely relax your mind and body and empty your lungs.

 

Repeat 3 times or as needed to calm your mind and relax your body.

 

 

Inhale deeply, all the way to the bottom of your spine progressively filling your lungs, bottom, middle, and top.

 

Hold for a moment.

 

Exhale slowly, gently emptying your lungs from the bottom to the top, gently squeezing out all of the air.

 

Hold for a minute and then repeat moves 3 to 6 for five minutes.
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My two cents: The Breath is our focus object, the vehicle we ride on our spiritual journey.

 

More knowledge about the breath seems beneficial for our mindfulness practice.
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Part two: “Altered Traits”: Different methods of meditating

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Seven years after his three-month retreat experiment ended, Cliff Saron tracked down the participants.

 

He found a surprise among those who, during and just after the retreat, were able to sustain attention to disturbing images of suffering—a psychophysiological measure of acceptance, as opposed to the averted gaze and expression of disgust he found in others (and which typifies people in general).

 

Those who did not avert their eyes but took in that suffering were, seven years later, better able to remember those specific pictures.

 

In cognitive science, such memory betokens a brain that was able to resist an emotional hijack, and so, take in that tragic image more fully, remember it more effectively—and, presumably, act.

 

 

 

Unlike other benefits of meditation that emerge gradually—like a quicker recovery from stress—enhancing compassion comes more readily.

 

 

 

We suspect that cultivating compassion may take advantage of “biological preparedness,” a programmed readiness to learn a given skill, as seen, for instance, in the rapidity with which toddlers learn language.

 

Just as with speaking, the brain seems primed to learn to love.

 

“This seems largely due to the brain’s caretaking circuitry, which we share with all other mammals.

 

These are the networks that light up when we love our children, our friends—anyone who falls within our natural circle of caring.

 

These circuits, among others, grow stronger even with short periods of compassion training.
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We heal by not ____________

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We heal by NOT thinking about our Trauma!
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We heal by NOT reacting to our Trauma.
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Dissociating is the king of our sysmptoms, thinking about past abuse or future danger dominates life.
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Healing happens when we do not react to our fight or flight mechanism.
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Healing happens when we can stay focused and present, when PTSD or Anxiety ignites our nervous system.
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The quickest way is using Meditation/Mindfulness to focus and integrate calmly and confidently.
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When we become friends with our nervous system, triggers exploding like volcanos become cap pistols.
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Explore your inner world, get to know you.
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Nothing to accomplish, nothing to fight or conquer, perfection is already inside.
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