Posts Tagged ‘AWARENESS’

Find a purpose for each thing you do

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From positive psychology
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Enter your mundane chores. Be the knife that slices the vegetables.  Slow down your pace, increase awareness.  

 

Let thought go, just be in the middle of this task.

 


Find the purpose for doing the laundry, washing the dishes, cutting the grass or going to school.

 

There exists joy in the present moment if we search for it.


Nothing is a waste.
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mindful thoughts


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Take stock of how your mind behaves. What do you think about first thing in the morning?

 

 

Write down your doubts, worries and fears.

 


Write down your strong points, your actions that bring the most peace.

 


Become aware if doubts, worries and fears outnumber your joys and peaceful moments.

 

 

Are you a positive or negative thinker?

 


What influences these choices?

 

 

Get to know your mind, explore!
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Know your mind, explore the inner world

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Where does your mind settle? What entices your mind into thought?

 

Rick Hanson’s says our mind has a negative slant, positive is Teflon, negative is Velcro. We always slow down to see the horrific wreck on the freeway.

 

Our mind unattended finds the negative, quickly!

 

This seems to be the origin of how we waste our lives.

 

We need to limit the time our mind is left unattended, wandering or ruminating in thought.

 

Seems a simple task. Our mind can be our friend or mental torturer.

 

Get to know the patterns of your mind, your daily thoughts, worries, doubts and fears.

 

Our wellbeing grows when we limit dissociation into past or future thought.

 

Do you know your mind or does your mind control you?

 

Do you know your inner world, nervous system?
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Healing from childhood abuse

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Trauma is stored in the right amygdala as implicit memory at the time it occurs.

 

It is stored along side your capabilities at that age.  Abused at five or ten and you feel like a child when trauma erupts. 

 

Part of healing integrates this trauma to the present moment.

 

My trauma is many decades old and my abuser is dead, so real danger is a mirage in real life.

 

The adrenaline and cortisol that jolts my nervous system is real. Our fight or flight mechanism is broken, reading danger everywhere.

 

Our goal is to integrate this implicit memory to now. We are not a 10-year-old anymore and have many more skills and alternatives now.

 

Our trauma happened before our minds developed fully thus confusing development with trauma.

 

Know the mechanism and characteristics of your abuse.  Write your triggers down to limit their power and their ability to impact your nervous system.

 

Develop a plan and a daily practice to confront this disorder.

 

Take action!

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A simple task

 

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In this moment right now, I am Present, I am Aware.

 


I observe my senses, the smells, textures, sounds and sights before me.

 


This is my simple, concrete task for today.
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A Mindfulness Practice, mine has four parts


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Mindfulness for me, has four parts or sides. One part is practice, time on the cushion, as the Buddhist say.

 

This quiet time is where we build our focus. Most people see this as so mundane and boring that daily practice becomes impossible. Many distractions frustrate 90% of those who try. You need a purpose to persevere and start a successful Mindfulness Practice.


The second part is application. After we have built our focus, explored our inner world, the next step is application. Check in as often as you can during the day, where is your focus? Are you lost in thought? Our goal is to spend more time in the present moment, each day growing a little.

 


The third part is dependent on the first two parts. We need strong focus, resilience in our nervous system and courage in this third part.

 

When a trigger explodes (fight or flight firing), our goal is to focus on the breath, feel the body sensation, then let go of the storyline. This does not happen immediately.

 

Maybe with eyes open we trace our breathing model for a few breaths. We try to dissipate the cortisol and adrenaline a little more each time. Confidence is gained each time we face this fear.

 


The last part tries to place ourselves in a space where happiness thrives. We try to observe life in the present moment more and more each day. It is a way of life if practiced with purpose.
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Psychology’s Replication Crisis Is Running Out of Excuses: The Atlantic by ED YONG

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Another big project has found that only half of studies can be repeated. And this time, the usual explanations fall flat.

 

Over the past few years, an international team of almost 200 psychologists has been trying to repeat a set of previously published experiments from its field, to see if it can get the same results. Despite its best efforts, the project, called Many Labs 2, has only succeeded in 14 out of 28 cases. Six years ago, that might have been shocking. Now it comes as expected (if still somewhat disturbing) news.

 

In recent years, it has become painfully clear that psychology is facing a “reproducibility crisis,” in which even famous, long-established phenomena—the stuff of textbooks and ted Talks—might not be real. There’s social priming, where subliminal exposures can influence our behavior. And ego depletion, the idea that we have a limited supply of willpower that can be exhausted. And the facial-feedback hypothesis, which simply says that smiling makes us feel happier.

 

 

One by one, researchers have tried to repeat the classic experiments behind these well-known effects—and failed. And whenever psychologists undertake large projects, like Many Labs 2, in which they replicate past experiments en masse, they typically succeed, on average, half of the time.

 

 

Ironically enough, it seems that one of the most reliable findings in psychology is that only half of psychological studies can be successfully repeated.

 

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