Posts Tagged ‘Attitude’

Childhood Trauma and Stuck Parts

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From Coping with Trauma Related Dissociation:

People with dissociative disorder often have related problems of time distortions. They experience time passing by much too slow or fast; perhaps more time has passed than they thought, or an hour seems like an entire day.

Some parts of the personality are often quite confused about where they are in space and time, believing they are still in the past.

When people with a dissociative disorder are alienated from their body, they may be insensitive to physical pain or lack sensation in parts of their body.

Some people report that they do not always always properly register heat and cold, cannot feel whether they are hungry or tired, or feel numb in their body.

Again, it is typically the case other parts of the self do feel the physical pain., the hunger, or other bodily sensations.

There are many different symptoms of depersonalization, but in every case it seems to be a way of avoidance or attempting to regulate overwhelming feelings or experiences.

Depersonalization symptoms may be temporary or chronic.

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Pain part four: The importance of perception

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From Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness

“Through research on people living with osteoarthritis, Dr Tasha Stanton from the University of South Australia has discovered there are many surprising factors that influence pain, including the way a person perceives their own body.

‘If we give people [with osteoarthritis] pictures of their hand at different sizes and we say ‘please pick out which one best represents your hand’, they will choose the image that is significantly smaller.

‘That suggests that there is alteration in their perception of the size of their body part.

‘But it’s not limited to that—we also see problems with their perception of touch. They are not very good at localising where they are being touched and they are not very good at localising where that body part is located in space.’

Stanton says these tests suggest people with chronic pain process location-specific information differently. She hopes to use this new information to develop new treatments.

‘The tack I have taken has been saying: if we have these altered perceptions in people with pain, what if we actually target these perceptions directly?’

Working with people with knee osteoarthritis, Stanton and her team have devised a series of experimental ‘visual illusions’, in which patients wear video goggles while researchers feed them a ‘live video link’ of their knee.

Patients watch the video in real-time, unaware researchers are covertly changing what’s on the screen in front of them.

‘One of the more potent illusions that we use is called the stretch illusion. They are looking down at their knee and suddenly they see it start to elongate, as if the joint is stretching out and being tractioned.

‘At that exact same time, we give a slight pull on the calf muscle.

‘Both the visual and touch information is telling their brain, “Actually, your knee is stretching out big and long!” And for some people, they are getting pain relief with this type of illusion.’

According to Stanton, the research supports other evidence that suggests that information from one sense—like touch or vision—can modulate information that is coming from another sense.

‘Our brain takes information from all these different senses—from touch, from sound, from vision, from movement—it puts all these things together for us to create a perception or a feeling of our own body.

‘It makes sense, then, for treatments to embrace that multisensory nature.’

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What chronic pain does to your brain: part 2

A model brain bisected IMAGE: THE THALAMUS HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS THE ‘BORDER IN THE BRAIN’ (FLICKR/DJ NEIGHT/CC BY NC ND 2.0)

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Researchers also found people with chronic pain experienced a reduction in the volume of their prefrontal cortex—the region of the brain that is understood to regulate emotions, personality expression and social behaviour.

This results in a further decline in the neurotransmitter GABA.

‘Every emotion and every cognition is amplified. People with ongoing pain, they anticipate pain with a lot of fear and they worry a lot of the time, and they can’t dampen down these feelings because the prefrontal cortex has lost its ability to dampen down these thoughts.’

Anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts can be big problems for those living with chronic pain, says Gustin.

Twenty per cent try to suicide.

A lot of clients who I see, they can’t stop their worrying, they can’t stop their anxiety, and they ask me why.

‘I think showing them that there are subtle changes in the brain—and because of these subtle brain changes, they have these thoughts and they can’t stop it—it helps them to cope with that, because a lot of times they are stigmatised.

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Part one: THE PAIN PARADOX from “Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness”.

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IMAGE: NEUROSCIENCE IS CLOSER THAN EVER TO UNDERSTANDING HOW CHRONIC PAIN AFFECTS THE BRAIN (MEDIA FOR MEDICAL/UIG VIA GETTY IMAGES)
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At least one in five Australians lives with chronic pain, and often the cause is unknown.

 

Scientists are just now discovering the crucial role the brain plays in how pain is experienced, and how it might pave the way for innovative treatment, write Lynne Malcolm and Olivia Willis.

 

The economic and social burden of chronic pain is enormous.

 

While analgesic drugs can provide pain relief for many, their side-effects, tolerance issues and addictiveness mean that scientists are on the hunt for alternative treatments.

 

Every emotion and every cognition is amplified. People with ongoing pain, they anticipate pain with a lot of fear and they worry a lot of the time.

 

DR SYLVIA GUSTIN, NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH AUSTRALIA

 

The challenge of developing such treatments has led to more research on the brain’s role in chronic pain.

 

‘At the moment we have focused our work to two areas in the brain,’ says Dr Sylvia Gustin from Neuroscience Research Australia. ‘One is called the thalamus—the other is the prefrontal cortex.’

 

Described as the ‘border in the brain’, the thalamus acts as the gateway between the spinal cord and higher brain

 

When you sustain an acute injury there is an opening in the thalamus for information to pass through from the affected body part to the brain.

 

‘This is very important because then we need to heal, we need to relax, we need to look after ourselves. After an acute injury is healed, we know that this border should actually close.’

 

When researching people who experience chronic pain, Gustin identified a key neurological difference: the opening in the thalamus remains open long after acute pain is gone.

 

Gustin’s team found a decrease in the volume of the thalamus, resulting in a decrease of a specific neurotransmitter: gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA.

 

‘What this means,’ Gustin says, ‘is that in people with ongoing pain, this border is always open. Every signal gets amplified and it results in the experience of pain.’

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“Nothing to Grasp”

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“I’ve discovered that there is no end to problems.

When we cure one problem, a new one emerges.

But this only becomes a source of suffering if we imagine it should or could be otherwise.

In fact, the turbulent, cloudy weather is as integral to the whole as the clear, sunny weather.”

Joan Tollifson

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My two cents: Saying something is a problem, reeks of a judgmental bias.

Problems are problematic, while challenges have opportunities.

Some people judge a situation as a challenge, an opportunity or a problem.

Seems to me this initial judgment has great influence on our attitude and personality.

Seems to me seeing a situation as an opportunity or a challenge leads to a happier existence.

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WORKING WITH EXPERIENCES from Meditation for the Love of it: Sally Kempton

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Once we write down our experiences, we have the material not only for contemplation but for going even deeper into the experience itself.

Looking at the experiences in my journal, it is clear that though they were very subtle, there was much to contemplate in them: realizations arose in them that created one more tiny shift in the sense of self.

Each time you realize something more about your true subtlety—

say, that your emotions are actually energy,

or that the spaciousness behind thoughts is the real you,

or that you are being breathed by a greater force (rather than being the one who breathes)—

you let go of another atom of attachment to the limited self.

Each tiny realization or insight arising in meditation creates a new pattern in your consciousness that you are free to revisit at any time.

The memory is there, and it is a memory of freedom.

You will deepen the new pattern each time you return to it.

In fact, the experience of one meditation can become a focus for practice in your next meditation.

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Perception becomes Reality

Pixabay: aitoff
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“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

― Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere’s Fan
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“What We Think, We Become. “

Buddha

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