Posts Tagged ‘Attitude’

Updated: Desire versus Gratitude: Which is dominant in your life?

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Xkeken Cenote, Mexico
Photograph by John Stanmeyer, National Geographic

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Let us take stock, how many things are we grateful for and how many things do we desire?
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What dominates our waking moments, desires or gratitude?
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Fact: Less desire and more gratitude is optimal!
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How much time do we spend on each endeavor?
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How much emotion is involved with desire, with gratitude?
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Do we feel loss when certain desires go unfulfilled?
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Are we missing things, small mundane things that warrant gratitude, thankfulness?
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All the sages say that gratitude leads to giving, more compassion and a happier existence.
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Updated: Shaila Catherine: part 1, Emotions

Blue Starfish

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“Emotions are dynamic processes that are in a state of flux.
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If you don’t refuel them through obsessive thinking, they will change and fade.
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We learn to be present to the full range of emotions by feeling their changing energetic expressions in the mind and body.
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For example, anger might bring heated, agitated explosive feelings radiating from the chest; sadness might carry a sinking vulnerable quality in the belly; fear might create an unstable quivering sensation in the knees or throat.
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Attending to the physical manifestations of emotions keeps attention focused on the process long enough for you to learn directly about how these difficult states impact your mind.
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Updated:Focused and Fearless: Relinquishment; The path of release!!!!!

a bed of golden, red and maroon coloured autumn fallen leaves

a bed of golden, red and maroon coloured autumn fallen leaves

Pics from http://www.freeimages.co.uk/linktous.htm
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“Let go of every fixation.
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Ultimately this is a path of release.
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The mind may attempt to construct itself on any foundation:
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through attachment to blissful jhanic states;
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by becoming “the one who lets go”;
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by being “the meditator who understands change.”
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Observe and laugh at the antics of the mind.
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Coax it to release its hold, even its attachment to good things.
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Uproot any place you find yourself stuck in, whether it be with the pleasures of the tranquil mind of jhana or in the clarity of insight.
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Resist the urge to keep score of your insights.
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Assessing your meditation practice only fuels grasping.
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Willingness to let go is indispensable.
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Every stage of this path requires a complete relinquishment of both the struggles and the delights, pleasant experiences and painful ones.
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Even the states of samadhi that you diligently cultivate must, in the end, be relinquished.
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choices

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You cannot control the results,
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only your actions.” .
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Allan Lokos
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My two cents: We control only two things attitude and effort.
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Place all your energy in these two areas and life will be much better.

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Attitude. Part one, it is important along with a mindful,practice !!!

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Attitude can overcome incredible challenges. The Human spirit can accomplish things we believe impossible. Look at how the mind, willpower can change a life.

“D. Danner and his colleagues studied the longevity of a group of 178 Catholic nuns born in the early twentieth century.
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They lived in the same convent and taught at the same school in Milwaukee.
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Their case is particularly interesting because the outward circumstances of their lives were remarkably similar: the same daily routines, same diet, no tobacco or alcohol, same social and financial status, and, lastly, same access to medical care.
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These factors eliminated many variables caused by environmental conditions.
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The researchers analyzed the autobiographical account that each nun had written before taking her vows.
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Psychologists who knew nothing about these women assessed the positive and negative sentiments expressed in their writings.
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Some had repeatedly mentioned that they were “very happy” or felt “great joy” at the thought of entering monastic life and serving others, while others manifested little or no positive emotion.
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Once the nuns were classified according to the degree of joy and satisfaction expressed in their brief bios, the results were correlated with their longevity.
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It turned out that 90 percent of the nuns placed in the “most happy” quarter of the group were still alive at eighty-five, as opposed to 34 percent of those in the “least happy” quarter.
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An in-depth analysis of their writing allowed the elimination of other fact that might have explained the disparate longevity figures:
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no link was established between the nuns’ longevity and the strength of their faith, the intellectual sophistication of their writing, their hopes for the future, or any other parameter that was considered.
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In a word, it would seem that happy nuns live longer than unhappy nuns. “
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Updated: Imagine how you would feel if the affirmation were absolutely true in your present reality. .

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“First, you need to do more than say the words.
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Remember I mentioned that the subconscious learns the most from emotion?
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That’s why you need to feel the words.
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Imagine how you would feel if the affirmation were absolutely true in your present reality.
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Allow yourself to physically feel this emotion.
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When it comes to manifesting something into the physical world using affirmations, it helps to close your eyes and visualize with strong images.
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In fact, any sensory input you can garner will help–smells, tastes, sounds and textures.
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In doing so, you activate the parts of the brain that experience that reality.
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The connections made in the brain when you have that experience become strengthened. .
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Your brain is literally making it a habit to have that experience.
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The deeper and longer you feel, the greater and faster your results.”
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Sounds like visualization.
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A MASTERY THAT SETS US FREE: “Why Meditate”

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As we shall see, the way we deal with thoughts in meditation is not to block them or feed them indefinitely, but to let them arise and dissolve by themselves in the field of mindfulness.
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In this way, they do not take over our minds. Beyond that, meditation consists in cultivating a way of being that is not subject to the patterns of habitual thinking.
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It often begins with analysis and then continues with contemplation and inner transformation.
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To be free is to be the master of ourselves.
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It is not a matter of doing whatever comes into our heads, but rather of freeing ourselves from the constraints and afflictions that dominate and obscure our minds.
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It is a matter of taking our life into our own hands rather than abandoning it to the tendencies created by habit and mental confusion.
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Instead of letting go of the helm and just allowing the boat to drift wherever the wind blows, freedom means setting a course toward a chosen destination—the destination that we know to be the most desirable for ourselves and others.
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