Posts Tagged ‘Attitude’

Be your own Life coach

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Change these behaviors: We eat for a few reasons, to avoid starvation, health and enjoyment. A healthy diet and moderation makes sense.


Three times a week enjoy some rigorous aerobic exercise. At least 30 to 60 minutes a workout. If you have energy yoga or resistance training are wonderful.


Practice meditating a minimum of 15 minutes a day. Bring energy, focus and gratitude to this soothing gift. Apply the awareness you have built during the day.

 

Calm the mind and try to release your stress.

 

Can you inspire yourself? Can you approach these challenges with a deep passion. I chose three areas to work on. You can add finances, shopping, planning, etc.

 

One of the greatest benefits of having a life coach is the demand for action. Many more people would heal if they took daily action.

 


Look at your practice with gratitude. Make a schedule to hold yourself accountable.
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I started a kindness practice

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My visual dates back to the original Star Trek, specifically how they were transported, beamed to and from planets.


That sparkly stuff (astral energy) surrounding them, I envision as kindness.

 

When I meditate, I surround myself with a blanket of kindness.


Compliments, approval, praise and acceptance join kindness in this soothing space.


Being completely kind to ourselves allows us to lead with kindness towards others.


My focus looks for ways to be kind, gentle with myself and others.


If I find myself ruminating, that is lost in thought, my attention switches to kindness.

 

I am actively choosing where to place my attention.

 

What fires together wires together.

 

Where we withdraw attention whithers, where we place our attention gains power.

 

This should be interesting, self soothing is not a familiar action for me.

 


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Another look at Worry


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Worry seems to have its own engine, a way of entering our consciousness without an invitation. It seems to be one of the function of our mind, everyone has worried, some incessantly.


When we worry the mind is engaged cognitively in the past and future, it’s speed increases. Awareness of reality, of this present moment, disappears when the mind speeds up.


Fear enters our consciousness with the possible consequences of our worry. Mental confusion makes it difficult to move, to take action, to let go of this created problem (Worry).

 

Worry seems to be a battle between the what if’s in life and living freely.  Worry in a way is a prediction of future doom created inside our doubts and fears.

 

So for me, my first task when confronting worry, is to slow my mind. I slow my breath, try to slow my heart and focus intently below the thoughts and emotions.

 

I know when my mind is racing, trouble is coming.


We always have our practice to slow us down and bring us back to now.


Worry does not exist with a mind that is present, empty and focused on the senses.

 

Worry will still visit but the stay will be shorter.
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An Affirmation

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In this moment, right now, I accept and approve of myself.

 

I surround myself with a soothing wall of kindness.

 

Life is a gift to be celebrated.
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The power of the Mind

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Nando Parrado: excerpt from a speech;

“I walked them through all the important moments of the ordeal so that they experienced it all just as I had, the wild grief I felt when Susy died, the terror when we heard that the search had been canceled, and the horror of chewing the flesh of our dead friends.

 

I placed them with us inside the fuselage on the night of the avalanche and in the grim days that followed.

 

I led them up the mountain and showed them the devastating view from the summit, then I took them with Roberto and me on the trek, which we were certain would lead us to our deaths.

I didn’t say a word about creativity or teamwork or problem solving.

 

I didn’t mention the word success.

 

Instead, I shared with them what I suddenly realized was the true lesson of my ordeal:

 

It wasn’t cleverness or courage or any kind of competence or savvy that saved us, it was nothing more than love, our love for each other, for our families, for the lives we wanted so desperately to live.

 

Our suffering in the Andes had swept away everything trivial and unimportant.

 

Each of us realized, with a clarity that is hard to describe, that the only crucial thing in life is the chance to love and be loved.

 

In our families, in our futures, we already had everything we needed. The sixteen of us who were lucky enough to return to our lives will never forget this.

 

No one should forget this.”

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Deep Secrets and Inner Child Healing

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Diana Raab

Excerpt:

“When putting the finishing touches on my most recent book, Writing for Bliss, I decided to include a section on inner-child healing. 

 

It wasn’t in my original draft, but I noticed that many friends and colleagues inquired about it, reminding me how healing and transformative it would be to write about and access the wounded child.

 

Around the same time, I’d just read Thich Nhat Hanh’s book Reconciliation, where the wise Buddhist said that inside each of us is a young, suffering child; and that to protect ourselves from future suffering, we all try to forget the pain. 

 

Most often, when we feel pain from a deep place within, it’s our inner wounded child who’s calling. Forgetting the pain results in more pain.

 

Writing about this pain can be one way to heal our inner child and help heal any negative emotions we might be holding on to. 

 

Research has shown that the body holds both emotional and physical pain, and even if we try to ignore that pain and forge ahead with our lives, chances are that it will always be there. 

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Amelia Earhart: the process is its own reward.”

 

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“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure, the process is its own reward.”

– Amelia Earhart
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My two cents: From a distance, it seems she lived her life full-out.


“The process is its own reward”: Life is a journey, taking action is the goal, it is the reward, results are fleeting.

 

The goal is to limit our attachments to possessions, titles, power, and trophies.

 

Some Buddhists give up all worldly possessions and their attachments to them.

 

Maybe we could try to bring more perspective to our attachments.
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