Posts Tagged ‘Attitude’

Another Acceptance post

Pixabay: mstlion

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Acceptance was difficult for me. Struggling to accept who I was, became extremely arduous.

How do you accept a damaged self image, an abusive childhood, in this moment? I struggled.

I avoided, tried to fix me and suffering ensued.

As most humans, I thought change was needed, I could achieve something to gain happiness in the future.

Happiness only happens in one time zone, NOW!

Happiness is impossible to experience in the future.

So we trade our only chance for happiness in for some euphoric prize in the future.

Realize this is a mirage created by our “Ego” craving control of our body.

Accept all of you, grow gratitude and giving, then let go and enjoy the moment, it is all there is.

Whether we accept ourselves totally or live a life of worry or doubt, death visits all of us.

We are here to pursue happiness.

Happiness contains acceptance, gratitude, giving and a focused empty mind.

It’s about fully entering into our experience—residing in the physical reality of the present moment.

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We should train our soldiers, PTSD WOULD DECLINE

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Matthew Ricard from “Happiness”

After the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1959, Tenzin Choedrak, the personal physician of the Dalai Lama, was first sent to a forced labor camp in northeastern Tibet along with some one hundred others.

Five prisoners, himself among them, survived.

He was transferred from camp to camp for nearly twenty years and often thought that he would die of hunger or of the abuse inflicted on him.

A psychiatrist who specializes in post-traumatic stress and who treated Doctor Choedrak was astonished that he showed not the least sign of post-traumatic stress syndrome.

He was not bitter, felt no resentment, displayed serene kindness, and had none of the usual psychological problems, such as anxiety, nightmares, and so on.

Choedrak acknowledged that he occasionally felt hatred for his torturers, but that he always returned to the practice of meditation on inner peace and compassion.

That was what sustained his desire to go on living and ultimately saved him.

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My two cent: Suicide is extremely rare or non existent for these world class meditators.

Amazing what we can endure if we let our judgments go, then stay present.

Inner peace and compassion sustained this monk for twenty years.

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Let’s practice not being special!

Pixabay: dozemode

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Today, relinquish all desire to be special. Can you tolerate being ordinary or even inept at something new.

Anything we struggle with, is a great proving ground for not being special. Join an expert group you have no knowledge about the subject.

When we are the novice, having nothing to add to the group, how does your “Ego” react.

Does he/she discount this group as not important, or lobby to exit this group. One thing for sure, our “Ego” does not like not being special.

We can learn our “Egos” personality in situations like this.

Observe his/her judgments and bias.

Do you agree with these judgments.

Do your “Egos” judgments harm or benefit your being?

In truth most harm!

Explore your inner world, know when the “Ego” is leading, judging and dominating.

Learn to observe, that is be present as the Aware Presence.

Aware Presence has no memory or thought, it is a neutral observer.

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Emptiness: Ever been told your “Full of it”. Some have added a sh

Pixabay: SnapwireSnaps

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“Emptiness means to be full of everything but empty of a separate existence.”

Thich Nhat Hahn

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My two cents: He is speaking of non-duality, the “Ego” we create (I, me, mine) does not exist.

Marty is the name that identifies me, not who I am. Now, I try to just be present, observing without Marty’s biased judgments.

Incredible how this action changes my thoughts, my enjoyment of life.

When we let this “Ego” recede we become more full of everything.

When the “Ego” dominates our existence life narrows substantially.

Full of Everything means desire and needs are in perspective, gratitude and giving are valued like gold.

Possessions are not an important part of everything.

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Unintended Consequences

Pixabay: Ben_Kerckx

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My healing path was anchored by hours spent each day devoted to meditating. A byproduct of this action, besides healing, was the opening of my compassion center.

This unintended consequence has brought anguish. Suffering a childhood like mine, then to be disowned by my family currently, felt lonely. I mean all you hear from people is family means everything.

I felt somewhat damaged, a little sorry for myself.

Yesterday, outside the grocery, I encountered a homeless man.

I could tell he was a loner, immediately. Somehow, I felt his isolation, his suffering, his fear.

It was cold and he had no family, no one who cares in the world, I almost cried. Now, this was real loneliness. As far as I could see, he had one tooth when I approached.

His gratitude for my small offering touched my soul.

In our society, we have so many homeless now, we look on them as subhuman.

Meditation has curbed my appetite for needing things. Giving and gratitude smother the desire for possessions, power or status.

I have dreams of having Bezos type money and power, then using it to eliminate suffering.

Without forethought, meditation has changed my life is so many unintended ways.

Carry a sandwich, an apple or a small treat to give to those in need.

This act of giving leads to an increase in gratitude and a better chance at being happy.

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Running in Place: “Everyday Zen by Charlotte J. Beck

Pixabay: Rilsonav

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The first stage in practice is to recognize that we’re not running in place, we’re always thinking about how our lives might be (or how they once were).

What is there in our life right now that we don’t want to run in place with? Whatever is repetitive or dull or painful or miserable: we don’t want to run in place with that. No indeed!

The first stage in practice is to realize that we are rarely present: we’re not experiencing life, we’re thinking about it, conceptualizing it, having opinions about it.

It is frightening to run in place. A major component of practice is to realize how this fear and unwillingness dominates us.

If we practice with patience and persistence, we enter the second stage.

We slowly begin to be conscious of the ego barriers of our life: the thoughts, the emotions, the evasions, the manipulations, can now be observed and objectified more easily.

This objectification is painful and revealing; but if we continue, the clouds obscuring the scenery become thinner.

And what is the crucial, healing third stage? It is the direct experiencing of whatever the scenery of our life is at any moment as we run in place.

Is it simple? Yes. Is it easy? No.

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We have a Choice!!!!!!!!

Pixabay: geralt

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Personally, life seemed to unfold much to quick, being abused dominated my existence.

My world was hyper critical, unworthiness permeated my thoughts, my being, my soul.

Always feeling not good enough, damaged my self worth.

My mind would be my worst enemy for 58 years, carrying those early judgments as gospel.

Most of our issues connect with the judgments we grasp.

The thoughts we entertain create our reality.

If I still believed I was flawed at my core, life would be miserable.

How can gratitude and giving thrive in my life?

In this moment right now, my opportunity is as great as anyone on this earth.

Not better, no worse, unlimited like you and me.

It is a choice to let the past go.

A choice to be present, focused and positive.

The choice to take action everyday changes us.

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