Posts Tagged ‘Anxiety’

Write it down! This is an easy task.

5F5B0C1A-F2E7-4E53-A9A9-97F2EBA5AF64

.

.
When we find ourselves occupied by doubt, worry, fear, jealousy, anger or anxiety, write it down.

 

 

Thoughts coupled with emotion can grow to enormous size inside our minds.

 

 

The abstract cognitions of a fear based disorder become a volatile accelerant.

 

 

Writing them down on paper contains their power and impact.

 

 

A fear or trigger becomes smaller, more finite when viewed on paper.

 

We see them outside our body and mind for the first time.

 

 

They are connected to a real mechanism, secreting cortisol and adrenaline to reinforce their power.

 

 

PTSD, anxiety and depression are fueled by thinking. Dissociative thinking, dwelling in the past and future.

 

 

Unworthy thoughts multiply inside past and future storytelling.

 

 

Our only safe harbor is this present moment, no matter how mundane or boring we perceive it.

 

 

Write down your fears, worries and anxieties.

 

 

See them as finite, impermanent and old habit.
.
.
.

Why is change so difficult???????????

.
.
Where does all the resistance come from? Why do we isolate, avoid unpleasant situations and people. Why do we chase and covet pleasant situations, people who approve of us, accomplishment, power, status and security?

 

Seems a decent strategy to avoid pain and soak up accomplishment in the short-term. Counterintuitive, knowing this strategy leads to suffering.

 

We have practiced habits, patterns of behavior, some subconscious in origin. We have created an “Ego” to mirror our habitual patterns. Our identity is wrapped around this “Ego”. Be it a banker, athlete, monk, priest, accountant, home maker, actor, philanthropist, etc.

 

 

Inside this cocoon, we judge ourself, find a place where we believe we fit, belong. When we enter a room, our “Ego” scans the occupants and decides if we are superior or inferior, then ranks our status.

 

 

Yes, this is superficial and kind of crazy. First, the “Ego” is a mirage, we are not what we think or judge. Second those occupations are what we do, not who we are.

 

 

Our mind is the issue, also the solution.

 

 

Fear of the unknown and this “Ego” are the main culprits keeping us from changing. We would rather suffer a known situation than risk changing, even when there is a possibility of success.

 

 

The “Ego” covets complete control. Healing means the “Ego” loses more and more control. In reality the “Ego” does not know what is good or bad for us. The “Ego” only, desires complete control.

 

 

Remember he/she generates 60,000 thoughts daily to influence where we place our attention.

 

 

You will definitely encounter your own “Ego” if you take this healing journey. He/She is not evil, he/she is only a follower not our captain.

 

 

Training the mind to empty and focus takes power from the “Ego”.
.
.
.

7 Ways Meditation Helps the Brain By Mike Bundran

 

.

.

“Meditation and brain research continue gaining popularity worldwide. New studies emerge revealing new benefits of meditation. For some, it’s just ancient benefits now confirmed by science.

 

 

The practice seems to have incredible neurological benefits. For instance, it changes the grey matter volume and enhances brain connectivity. How true are these claims?

 

 

Here are some of the most amazing studies showing the potential impact of meditation on our brains.

1. Preserves the aging brain

Long-term meditators have more preserved brains as compared to non-mediators with age according to UCLA. The study found that long-term meditation participants had more grey matter volume than non-mediators. However, older mediators had smaller volume loss than young meditators. Nonetheless, it wasn’t as pronounced as that of non-mediators.

The study also found that the effect was not just located on the part of the brain associated with meditation. Instead, it was widespread throughout the entire brain.

 

 

2. Reduces mind-wandering and self-referential thoughts

Mind wandering is usually associated with worrying, ruminating and being unhappy. Most people want to dial it down. A study by Yale University discovered that mindfulness meditation reduces the brain network responsible for self-referential thoughts and mind-wandering. Although mind-wandering is often associated with creativity, too much of it is a stress-increaser.

 

Continue reading

Updated: Inner Peace and Loving Kindness

287000C2-308D-4F29-9747-2135963E4C2E

.
.
Inhale:   I give myself inner peace.

 

 

Visualize inner peace entering your lungs, being absorbed, soothing your being.

 

 

Hold on to the pause, feel your lungs expanded, full.

 

 

Exhale:    I give myself loving kindness.

 

Feel the energy around your solar plexus.

 

Repeat, inhale, hold, exhale, hold.

 

Focus,  let go of thought, enjoy this exercise.

 

Meditate using this technique.
.
.
.

“People exposed to chronic or repeated traumatic events may also lose faith in humanity or have a sense of hopelessness about the future.” By Matthew Tull

6FE1B897-E8C6-40E7-9067-918E09D0675B

.

.
My two cents: I was ashamed to admit my feelings of hopelessness to myself or anyone else. It felt like a glaring character flaw, a damaged human being to me.

 

My childhood was dominated by hopelessness in the face of my narcissistic caregiver. There was no way to win, to be left alone, to escape the abuse.

 

To a child a parent can be a giant, a monster. My abuse started at an early age before my brain had a chance to develop.

 

Hopelessness and helplessness can be awakened by stress, loss and tragedy.

 

My wellbeing depends on my awareness and mindfulness skills.

 

Dissociation in its most basic description, is leaving this present moment to think about the past or future

 


Dissociation leads me towards hopelessness, inflames doubt, worry, fear, anxiety and anger inside me. Triggers explode if our PTSD is active.

 

Staying present extinguishes that flame.

 

Visually, I have learned to look and see without judgment as I focus intently on my breath.

 

One path leads to suffering, the other brings you to this present moment.


This present moment is all we have, then we move to the next moment, nothing more.
.
.
.

Meditation is not passive!!!

131145EC-5BC2-40D2-B1B3-9CC900C417EB

.
.
“The practice of meditation is not a passive,

 

navel-gazing luxury for people looking to escape the rigors of our complex world.

 

Mindfulness and meditation are about deeply changing ourselves

 

so that we can be the change that we see needed for the world.”

 

—Larry Yang
.
.
.
Meditation done properly is a Roto-rooter, an excavation tool unearthing vulnerabilities and trauma..

 

Healing, finding inner peace, is the path less traveled.

 

 

We have to earn our inner peace!
.

.
.

 

 

Researchers Discover ‘Anxiety Cells’ In The Brain; January 31, 2018

B9EE26AD-FE70-481C-A6F9-FA3CF8FA1D5F

Scientists zeroed in on specific neurons in the brains of mice to gain insights into how anxiety is triggered and suppressed.
SPL/Science Source
.
.
Scientists have found specialized brain cells in mice that appear to control anxiety levels.

 

The finding, reported Wednesday in the journal Neuron, could eventually lead to better treatments for anxiety disorders, which affect nearly 1 in 5 adults in the U.S.

 

“The therapies we have now have significant drawbacks,” says Mazen Kheirbek, an assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco and an author of the study. “This is another target that we can try to move the field forward for finding new therapies.”

 

But the research is at an early stage and lab findings in animals don’t always pan out in humans.

 

The discovery of anxiety cells is just the latest example of the “tremendous progress” scientists have made toward understanding how anxiety works in the brain, says Joshua Gordon, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, which helped fund the research.

 

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: