Posts Tagged ‘Anxiety’

Meditation is not passive!!!

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“The practice of meditation is not a passive,

 

navel-gazing luxury for people looking to escape the rigors of our complex world.

 

Mindfulness and meditation are about deeply changing ourselves

 

so that we can be the change that we see needed for the world.”

 

—Larry Yang
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Meditation done properly is a Roto-rooter, an excavation tool unearthing vulnerabilities and trauma..

 

Healing, finding inner peace, is the path less traveled.

 

 

We have to earn our inner peace!
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Inner Peace and Loving Kindness

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Inhale:   I give myself inner peace.

 

 

Visualize inner peace entering your lungs, being absorbed, soothing your being.

 

 

Hold on to the pause, feel your lungs expanded, full.

 

 

Exhale:    I give myself loving kindness.

 

Feel the energy around your solar plexus.

 

Repeat, inhale, hold, exhale, hold.

 

Focus,  let go of thought, enjoy this exercise.

 

Meditate using this technique.
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Researchers Discover ‘Anxiety Cells’ In The Brain; January 31, 2018

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Scientists zeroed in on specific neurons in the brains of mice to gain insights into how anxiety is triggered and suppressed.
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Scientists have found specialized brain cells in mice that appear to control anxiety levels.

 

The finding, reported Wednesday in the journal Neuron, could eventually lead to better treatments for anxiety disorders, which affect nearly 1 in 5 adults in the U.S.

 

“The therapies we have now have significant drawbacks,” says Mazen Kheirbek, an assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco and an author of the study. “This is another target that we can try to move the field forward for finding new therapies.”

 

But the research is at an early stage and lab findings in animals don’t always pan out in humans.

 

The discovery of anxiety cells is just the latest example of the “tremendous progress” scientists have made toward understanding how anxiety works in the brain, says Joshua Gordon, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, which helped fund the research.

 

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Ricard: Learning to welcome Difficult Emotions

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“One crucial aspect of working with our emotions is learning to stop viewing them as obstacles to our happiness.
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We almost always judge the emotions that feel bad as bad; we see them as the enemy, as something to be conquered or eradicated.”
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I think our judging happens without thought, as though it is an involuntary reflex, habitually practiced with every external experience.
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We avoid our own body functions, adrenal stress response (fight or flight), difficult emotions, (fear, anxiety, self doubt, anxiety, etc.), pain or unpleasantness.
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Having the ability to experience awkward, unpleasant, or anxious situations without judgment frees us to experience this current moment.
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Go visit an uncomfortable or awkward situation today without reacting, without judging until these emotions subside.
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Let the storyline go and feel the body sensations, intimately, quietly.
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On the surface judging steals our waking time needed to experience happiness, freedom,the present moment, life.
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99% of all judgments impact our chance of being happy negatively.
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Healing, finding happiness is not a birth right, it is earned through daily work.
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From the Book: Coping with Trauma-Related Dissociation:

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Felice Beato.
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“People with complex dissociative disorder were often confronted as children with situations that evoke extreme and overwhelming emotions.
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Generally younger children learn from their caregivers how to understand and regulate emotions.
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People with dissociative disorder often grew up in families in which it was not acceptable to show or discuss certain emotions.
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In some cases it was actually dangerous to express feelings, resulting in punishment, ridicule or complete disregard.
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Parents or caregivers of people with complex dissociative disorder typically had a problem with emotions themselves and were thus unable to teach children adaptive and healthy skills to deal with emotions.
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These children learn to avoid or disregard their own feelings.
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They also have difficulty reflecting, that is, accurate reading other people’s emotions and intentions in the present, generally assuming something negative rather than positive.”
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A viewers asks about dissociation

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Rio commented: “I have made friends with someone who disassociates. There are times when he reaches out for help but I am unable to offer as I don’t know the best type of reply /response. Where can I find out more from the other side of the story.”
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If you make it complex it will be complex and become impossible to alter.
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If you want to use the simplest of building blocks, breathe with him.
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Use my model. Print a copy and trace one breathing cycle with him then another (inhale, pause, exhale, pause).
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Use the words let go, come back to now, see the flowers, smell the coffee, feel the air filling then exiting your lungs.
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You could smack him across the face and tell him to look you in the eye. That would bring him back to the present moment also. Kinda harsh and hard on the friendship, though.
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Three breathes and your friend will be back in the present.
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The task is simple, the application is constant.
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Ask your friend from time to time where he is at? You may find this practice a benefit to your life also.
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The mind can be trained, asked any Buddhist monk.
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If we can realize the goal, … … . .the trophy, the status, all the high strung emotions .. . . .are hollow, impermanent, unimportant?

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Then we
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realize,
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it is
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the journey,
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how
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we play
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the game,
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live
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our life,
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that matters.
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