Posts Tagged ‘Aerobic exercise’

What do you do for your mental health, daily?

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People have a hard time letting go of their suffering. Out of a fear of the unknown, they prefer suffering that is familiar.
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Thich Nhat Hanh
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Getting people to take action is the toughest thing a therapist or life coach faces.
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People want a pill to cure them or a therpast to heal them inside that hour session.
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We convince ourself to suffer what habit has taught us over and over.
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Do you work on your mental health?
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Why not?
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Our purpose in life is to be happy, says Matthew Ricard!
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What have you done to cultivate happiness?
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Possessions, approval, success, achievement are just impermanent possessions, surely not happiness.
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Maybe we need to explore our inner world to know what happiness is and where it hangs out.
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Is change so scary or the unknown so terrifying or are we lazy?
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Washington Post: This no mess approach to fighting depression may work

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Funnel Cloud, Minnesota
Photograph by Mitch Dobrowner
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By Nancy Szokan:  February 15, 2016;
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It’s well known that physical activity is a mood elevator. But writing in “The Athlete’s Way” blog on Psychology Today’s website, endurance athlete Christopher Bergland discusses a study indicating that combining movement with the attention-focusing benefits of meditation can be an extra-effective tool in fighting depression.
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The small study, conducted at Rutgers University in New Jersey, was based on a set of assumptions: Healthy brains are constantly producing neurons.
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Brains of people under stress or suffering depression produce fewer neurons.
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Physical activity increases neuron production, as do antidepressant medications.
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(Meanwhile, a certain number of newborn neurons die off.)
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Mental exercise — “effortful learning,” which requires focus — reduces those deaths. People with depression often have problems with focus.
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The researchers tested a novel intervention — it’s called MAP because it involves mental and physical training — aimed at both increasing neuron production and keeping those neurons alive.
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Fifty-two people completed the study — 22 with major depressive disorder, or MDD, and 30 who were not depressed.
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Twice a week, they performed 30 minutes of meditation during which they were directed to constantly focus on their breathing; they began each session seated, but for the last 10 minutes they meditated while walking slowly.
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Then they performed 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on a treadmill or stationary cycle.
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After eight weeks, the researchers found that the MDD patients’ depressive symptoms had been reduced by 40 percent. (The non-depressed participants also said they felt happier.)
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“Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression,” the researchers wrote, “these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective.”
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Or, as Bergland puts it, it’s a “double whammy” against depression, And the best part is, both aerobic exercise and meditation are universally available, nonpharmaceutical and free.
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Shaila Catherine::: Ownership!!!!



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“On the surface it seems like we are asked to give up everything,
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but simultaneously comes the realization
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that there is actually nothing possessed
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and consequently nothing
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that can actually be given up.
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The great abandonment is to let go of the concept of ownership.
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Letting go in meditation is the relinquishment that involves no loss.”
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Meditation also is a safe exposure therapy with no risk of harm or loss.
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Release judgment and ownership will decline.
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Ownership is important to the ego.
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How to Train a Wild Elephant: And Other Adventures in Mindfulness ::Prayer and deep listening

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“True prayer

is not

petitioning,

it is

listening.

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Deep listening.

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When we listen deeply,

we find that even the

“sound” of our own

thoughts

is disruptive,

even annoying.

Letting go

of thoughts,

we enter

a more

profound

inner stillness

and receptivity.

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If this open silence can be held at our core, as our core, then we are no longer confused by trying to sort out and choose among our myriad competing inner voices.”

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If you find yourself stuck, frozen, almost paralyzed with fear and confusion, , ,What can we do?

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We have options.

Action, movement, both physical and mental fuel our recovery.

Momentum is a funny thing. Watch any competitive sport, as pro football, and momentum is an invisible power like the wind.

Momentum benefits the mind and body exponentially, moves a frozen spirit.

First, I can exert all out energy on an aerobic exercise. My visualization enhances my practice. I envision trauma trying to stop my legs from moving. Now, I have placed PTSD as my opponent and we are about to compete, wage war with him.

From this space, a situation where I am exhausted, my ego wants to quit, go home and lay on the couch.

Our response is to walk another 15 minutes. Music blaring, focus on the breath, I envision walking through a brick wall, if needed. The game is afoot.

When this exercise is done, accomplishment and exhilaration invade my body. The mind shares this jolt of energy and positive emotion.

What has been accomplished? Poisons have been flushed, all the joints and organs in the body have been bathed and oiled, the lungs and heart have been strengthened and finally the body has been pushed past exhaustion.

Trauma, also has been dealt a blow. Making trauma my opponent, has placed me in a competitive situation. An antagonistic space, where we are moving, taking action while trauma is around.

This is a huge psychological advantage. When we can befriend our fear (fight or flight mechanism) PTSD dies quickly.
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