Posts Tagged ‘action’

The Connection Between PTSD and Suicide By Matthew Tull, PhD Updated September 02, 2019

Artur Borzecki Photography/Getty Images

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“In the United States, more than 40,000 people commit suicide each year. Although women attempt suicide more so than men, men are more likely to succeed in killing themselves during a suicide attempt. In addition, people who have experienced a traumatic event and/or have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be more likely to attempt suicide.

Trauma, PTSD, and Suicide

In a survey of 5,877 people across the United States, it was found that people who had experienced physical or sexual assault in their life also had a high likelihood of attempting to take their own life at some point:

Nearly 22% of people who had been raped had also attempted suicide at some point in their life.

Approximately 23% of people who had experienced a physical assault had also attempted suicide at some point in their life.

These rates of suicide attempts increased considerably among people who had experienced multiple incidents of sexual (42.9%) or physical assault (73.5%). They also found that a history of sexual molestation, physical abuse as a child, and neglect as a child were associated with high rates of suicide attempts (17.4% to 23.9%)

People with a diagnosis of PTSD are also at greater risk to attempt suicide. Among people who have had a diagnosis of PTSD at some point in their lifetime, approximately 27% have also attempted suicide.

There Is Hope: Seeking Help

Experiencing a traumatic event and/or developing PTSD can have a tremendous impact on a person’s life. The symptoms of PTSD can make a person feel constantly afraid and isolated. In addition, depression is common following a traumatic event and among people with PTSD.

A person may feel as though there is no hope or escape from their symptoms, leading them to contemplate suicide.

It is important to realize that even though it may feel as though there is no hope, recovery and healing is possible. If you are having thoughts of ending your life or if you know someone who is having these thoughts, it is important to seek help as soon as possible.”

Does your life with Chronic Pain feel like this?

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My chronic pain was like the wind, invisible, powerful and relentless at times.

How was I going to battle such a ghost. I named my pain Mr P. after the old Happy Days show, Mr. C.

Mr. P. Was my nemesis when I hiked. Mr. P. wanted to stop my legs from moving, from confronting my fear, from taking control of my mind back.

My mindset was centered around my greatest strength, my willpower, determination. Always incorporate your strengths as part of your solutions.

My mindset as usual, a jock accepts the challenge before him/her. No way was Pain going stop my legs from moving!

My exercise routine became an emotional battle between pain and my will.

In a way it was exhilarating. I convinced myself not many humans could hike in such pain day after day.

We jocks always imagined being at bat with the bases loaded, two outs bottom of ninth, game seven of World Series. This was my chronic pain version.

Visualization is powerful. I would imagine myself in “The Last of the Mohicans” running with Hawkeye, running for our life.

Music gave me a beat that I could synchronize my legs with. My legs would move to a beat when they were exhausted, ready to quit.

Chronic pain became a friend. Adversity makes us stronger.

Chronic pain strengthened my meditation practice. I truly learned how to focus and dissipate my pain level.

Pain constricted, became much more bearable, then faded as months passed. Aerobic exercise and meditation were my tools.

I would set in the middle of my pain with my breath, no judgments just observing.

My breath could dissipate my pain. My familiarity allowed me to sit calmly inside my pain. My pain received no energy from fear, attention or thought.

After a few years I had compartmentalzed my chronic pain.

Acute pain is a different animal.

Pain eats energy but does not touch my soul, or my enthusiasm for life.

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Effort and Attitude

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If we must judge ourselves, base your assessment on the effort you give.

Do you give all out effort, try to practice and live fully?

If so relax and enjoy the journey.

Results are external and out of our control.

We control our effort and attitude.

Be present, be positive and look for opportunity.

Let go of the rest.

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Healing is not a spectator sport

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If we want to heal, daily work is necessary.

All my reading and blogging blessed me with a direction and tools, not healing.

Healing came with application and daily practice.

Simple, small, concrete tasks repeated daily, benefitted me the most.

Having a purpose was extremely important.

Believing I could heal or at least battle everyday with a good attitude was important.

Being humble was part of my journey.

Letting go of the narrative about I, me, mine needing importance and approval was important.

I had to train my mind to focus and let go.

This is the path to freedom.

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Healing takes action not thought

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“Rule of survival: Pack your own parachute.”

 

T.L. Hakala
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My two cents: We are responsible for our own happiness or suffering.

 

 

Taking responsibility for healing or happiness comes with daily effort and action.

 

 

Thinking about healing or being happy does not influence our condition.

 

 

Doing nothing brings suffering. PTSD grows as time passes, gains strength and becomes more debilitating. Depression grows with isolation and inaction.

 

 

Action is closer to life, sedentary closer to death.

 

 

Change is inevitable, so adapting, taking action is part of living fully.

 

 

Have a daily practice plan (action not reading or thinking) whether you devote 15 minutes or 60 minutes a day.

 

Add strenuous aerobic exercise to flush the toxins, to secrete endorphins to soothe our pains and to bring accomplishment to both mind and body.
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Giving is more valuable than gold: It can be Contagious

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Look at all the divisiveness and hate in our country.  How do we navigate in this climate?

 

Quit thinking and analyzing, take action, give without regard for reward.

 

Make a difference for a one  human being today, a stranger, a needy elderly person, lonely,  craving a little kindness.

 

Travel the mundane parts of life, armed with gifts for all those you meet, paying special attention to those in need.

 

It may only be a smile coupled with a kind greeting.

 

Donate a few minutes to help, to give, to be compassionate.

 

Achievement can not match giving for power or longevity.

 

Kindness is permanent, free and available to all of us.

 

Do not overlook the needy, the homeless, we share this journey together, not in competition.

 

Let go of that ego, let that compassionate true self emerge.

 

Continue reading

My mindfulness group starts to improve before my Eyes!

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(Start at bottom right at the dot, then trace upward with the inhale for 3 seconds,,then pause for 2 seconds, then exhale for 3 seconds,,closing with a 2 second pause, 10 second breaths)
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Kelly from group writes:
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“Marty i am here to tell you. Sitting with your breath is so sweet and simply that at the start i thought you were nuts. but i was desperate to change. I followed thru and i am here to tell you. I am doing things i never thought i would do. I am sleeping but. I was driving down the freeway and not having a panic attack. My agoraphobia is improving and i am feeling freedom. I feel this inner peace i never thought possible. some days i think oh my i need to hurry do something and get that panic feeling. Then i stop and say no that is your ego. You need to breath. Thank you so very much for teaching me how to save my life and the future of my children.”
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Kelly is one of two in the mindfulness group, who has experienced this improvement in a month. I thought this impossible.
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The girls have reached empty at an accelerated rate.
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Why?
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The difference: Both have been taught to use the breathing track, instead of counting their breaths. First with eyes open, physically tracing the model as we breathe, feeling the breath curve around the transitions.
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It is a symphony of sorts, a melody of balance that soothes our nerve endings.
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All the abstract has been eliminated, counting ceased, goals vacated, we focus and follow our breath on the model.
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The only other ingredient is sound, hearing. They have been taught to seek out the lowest decibel sound in the room, then to venture underneath, slowing the breath.
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The goal is to be able to hear the sound of the inhale.
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Kelly and Mechelle have learned to let go, let thought fade and thus empty the mind, incredibly quick.
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When the mind is focused and empty, present in this moment, our organism repairs itself and then the mind expands. Our organism balances mind and body and thrives in this space.
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Things we thought impossible are completed without effort at times.
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Another experienced meditator in the group, Tom, mentioned that it took him two years to reach where the girls have reached in a month. It is not only my observation but his also.
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I have witnessed the greatest results from desperate people, needing to change, going to take action in some direction.
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Healing seems to happen when desperation brings action.
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