Posts Tagged ‘ACCEPTANCE’

We need not win but we must fight

Pixabay: Michalqiao13591

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In my opinion, results are way above our pay grade. Results have many external influences out of our control.

We must find our purpose in life, then expend total effort with a positive attitude through good and not so good times.

For me, sentenced to an abusive childhood, winning was impossible.

An adult, a giant, had robbed me of my childhood and traumatized my being that would last a lifetime.

Winning was impossible. Feeling normal a dream, feeling worthy, my battle.

My fight was for survival until I could get away from the torture.

Now, my attitude and effort fill my being. Feeling worthy grew from an internal way of being, accepting and giving.

I do not judge myself anymore, I meditate, grow my gratitude and compassion daily.

We need not win but we must fight.

It is the journey we need to work on, not goals, status or approval.

Fighting is not aggressive, in fact fighting trauma, depression or anxiety is accepting, being vulnerable to our fears.

Healing is a humbling journey, the fight is accepting all of us, a worthy soul, a kind friend to all.

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How is your Relationship with Anxiety?

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The five major types of anxiety disorders are:

Generalized Anxiety Disorder. …

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) …

Panic Disorder. …

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) …

Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder)

What is your relationship with anxiety? If you have one of these disorders your relationship is different with anxiety.

We always seem to want to eliminate anxiety completely. We grow extremely sensitive and try to avoid any hint of anxiety.

The way to heal is the opposite.

Can you tolerate sitting in the middle of your anxiety, breathing, observing, dissipating.

Yes, we need to sit quietly in the middle of our anxious feelings.

Your breath can dissipate that cortisol and adrenaline.

Resistance, avoidance or denial is jet fuel for anxiety.

Anger enrages anxiety to a higher pitch.

Trying to avoid anxiety leads to suffering.

Is anxiety a terrible thing?

It is part of our minds makeup.

We all have anxiety, it has a purpose.

Anxiety disorders are extremely hard to reach consciously.

PTSD is stored out of conscious reach so anxiety is hard to heal.

Meditation reaches the place where trauma is stored.

When anxiety arrives your choice decides your fate.

Avoid, resist, deny and suffer, accept, breathe, dissipate and enjoy a different outcome.

Healing and happines are an internal way of living.

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A trigger 🔥 fires 🔥 what is our thought process

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A trigger firing brings different emotions, the dominant one is real fear, terror for some, opportunity for a few.

Someone shared that they joined a new mental health group, risking, healing. After a few meetings, her triggers erupted.

She was afraid and thought it was a bad decision. That trigger was a reaction to her taking control of her life.

PTSD is going to resist our efforts to heal, to take back control of our life.

Anxiety, triggers exploding, being afraid is part of the healing path.

Triggers are not to be feared.

They are opportunities to heal.

When PTSD is at its apex of power, violent triggers erupting, it is also at its most vulnerable.

PTSD is a bluff that has the key to our fight or flight mechanism. PTSD has the ability to dump cortisol and adrenaline into our system, preparing for a lethal threat.

We have to know the difference between real danger and PTSD danger.

We breathe, stay focused while this imaginary fear dissipates.

Triggers are the doors to healing.

Become friends with your nervous system, your fight or flight mechanism, your protector.

Anxiety dissipates with extended, focused breaths.

Our breath controls our nervous system.

Our breath is the weapon that when focused intently, can neutralize traumas impact.

We have to keep moving when anxiety makes us cautious.

Takes courage to stay silent, still, focused when chaos wants us to flee in terror.

Meditation sets a collision course with our demons (PTSD).

It is the road to healing.

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Hiding in plain Sight!

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Most people I run across have lost sight of the importance of gratitude and kindness.

We all think we are flawed or we need to change, overcome or cure something to be happy.

Gratitude becomes hidden, buried amongst unfulfilled desires, replaced by Worry, doubt and unworthiness.

Hard to be grateful when we feel loss, hurt, sadness, anger, hate, jealousy or depression.

If we have a disorder like Anxiety, PTSD, depression, bi polar etc., how often do we feel gratitude.

We have a mountain of gratitude, an unlimited amount of kindness available right now.

We search for all these external cures when vast amounts of gratitude and kindness are available right below the surface.

Gratitude for ourselves remains hidden deeper, harder to find.

I know people who shower others with kindness, then ignore giving any praise for themselves.

In fact, many feel unworthy, who shower others with praise and kindness.

How can we be grateful right now?

We have to let all those false judgments about who we are go!

We are present, in this moment, focused and aware, that is enough.

The mind can be trained to focus, to empty itself of ruminating thought and be present in this moment.

All the noise fades into oblivion, and we see what has been in front of us all along, hidden in the confusion of thought and negative emotions.

How will you know if a better way of living is available?

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Where we place our Attention matters

Pixabay.com

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Can you tolerate not expressing negative emotions,

Anger. …

Annoyance. …

Sadness. …

Guilt. …

Fear and anxiety. …

Discouragement and despair. …

Apathy. …

Disappointment and frustration.

How much time would you free up?

Would positive emotions increase?

With no negative emotions getting play time, positive emotions will dominate your personality.

This idea is at the core of mindfulness.

Where we place our attention impacts life in a profound way.

In fact, I believe it is the greatest power of the mind.

A trained, focused mind does not waste energy on negative emotions.

If sadness arrives from life, sadness is felt completely without judgment, then we come back to now.

We live life, narration ceases, judgments are sparse, simple things excite us.

Please share your views and insights.

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Ptsd makes us defensive maybe even in denial

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I deal with people with PTSD, some with childhood Trauma.

Childhood trauma is a special kind of trauma, our brains have not developed, so trauma intertwines itself like an octopus with our mind.

Since trauma was endured over such a long period of time, healing is more arduous and lengthy. Remember trauma is stored with our abilities at the time it occurs.

Some trauma feels like a five year old memory to me.

Understand you have the cognitive abilities of a five year old when in the midst of this trigger firing.

Trying to think your way out will fail. It is a subconscious terrain that houses that memory.

We carry this trauma, reinforce the narrative we create with others. This narrative influences the “Ego” we create.

Think how we define “Who am I” with these influences.

Sometimes our narrative describes us as a victim of circumstance. Any narrative is a mirage.

I damn sure am not a superhero either, or some great savior of mankind.

PTSD sufferers will fight you to keep their narrative. This narrative excludes them from taking responsibility for their life.

What does your narrative say about you?

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Who am I?

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I was given my identity from my parents, my mother said God made me to be a professional baseball player. My father had stronger convictions about who I was.

Of course my “Ego” was created around this edict. “Who am I” was decided for me, “I” did not have a say according to my parents.

Before 30 I was out of professional baseball, who was I now has always been a conundrum for me.

My father treated me differently depending on my performance. Yes, it was complete conditioned love ❤️. A toxic love of brutality and control.

What hapoens when your first caregivers steal your identity?

You wander through life lost, looking for meaning, relevance, identity.

At 67 my “Ego” has dropped that baseball ⚾️ moniker.

It was hard to accept others definition of who you are.

My childhood was stolen. It is our job to limit the impact to just our childhood.

It was only my childhood, I have found out “Who I am “ during my healing journey.

I am not any label and definitely not unworthy.

I am present, aware and focused. That is enough!

I am a giver, a person with large amounts of gratitude, a content, calm, kind man.

That last sentence did not appear without great effort on my journey.

Find your true self through inner exploration and discovery.

Trauma is an invisible prison!

Refuse to label, stay present, alive, and active.

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