Posts Tagged ‘ACCEPTANCE’

There was no sense of a self owning them.”

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“As I noticed feelings and thoughts appear and disappear,

 

 

it became increasingly clear that

 

 

they were just coming and going on their own. . . .

 

 

There was no sense of a self owning them.”

 

– Tara Brach
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Incredibly there are 60,000 thoughts that enter our consciousness everyday, about one a second.

 

Common sense tell us that during this last minute (60 seconds), we did not grasp 60 thoughts.

 

Why do we choose negative ones more often?

 

The “Ego” chooses thought, while our true self chooses to be empty in this present moment.

 

 

Being lost in thought constantly, fuels depression, anxiety, PTSD and suffering.
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We need to release the thinker at times!!!!!!!

 

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When triggered, depressed, anxious, angry, stressed or fearful, we must limit its duration! These emotional sates can consume life, every waking moment.

 

The longer we grasp them, the stronger the neural pathway that forms.

 

We have many tools. First we need to let go of the storyline attached to these negative emotions.

 

If we have practiced meditating, we are able to focus on the breath, allowing these emotions to fade from our consciousness. Our breathing is the easiest and quickest way we can calm down.

 

 

I used gratitude to replace negative emotion. I gave thanks for small things, a hot shower, friends, my health, my practice, my tools for healing, etc. I found my gratitude dwarfed that emotion.

 

 

Distraction or entering a task can bring many benefits. I go hike in nature, strenuously. What my eyes see, my nose smells and skin feels is witnessed without judgment. This brings me achievement and exhilaration to body and mind.

 

 

Every time a negative storyline arrives with negative emotion, insert your affirmation. In this moment, right now, I accept all of me. I am perfect as my true self, seeing unlimited opportunity available, today.

 

Prepare a meal or do the laundry. Enter the task, be the knife slicing the vegetables. Slow down, let thought clear, just be in the moment.

 

 

Give and give some more. Giving, maybe just a smile and kind greeting. Care about someone beyond your own ego. Feel their pain, their need! Offer some small comfort.
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The Ego inflates or deflates

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“As long as we have practiced neither concentration nor mindfulness,

 

 

the ego takes itself for granted and remains its usual normal size,

 

 

as big as the people around one will allow.”

 

Ayya Khema
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The ego inflates or deflates with external stimulus, feedback.

 

 

The drive for approval and the avoidance of criticism charts the “ego’s” path.

 

 

 

Thoughts, cognitions, and emotional judgments increase the ”ego’s” presence.

 

 

Meditation/Mindfulness let’s the “ego” fade into the background.

 

 

Make sometime for the mind to be focused, empty and calm.
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New York Post: Americans are more depressed and miserable than ever!

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There’s nothing here to smile about.

 

For the first time on record, there was not a single state in America that saw an improvement in its residents’ levels of overall well-being, according to data released Tuesday from Gallup and digital health company Sharecare, which included 160,000 interviews from residents of all 50 states. Well-being — which measures everything from mental, physical and financial health to having solid relationships and a sense of purpose in your life — is a way of looking at the quality of Americans lives.

 

Furthermore, “the 21 US states that saw their wellbeing drop in 2017 shattered the previous record set in 2009 amidst the Great Recession when 15 states had lower well-being than the year before,” note Gallup and Sharecare, which began looking into well-being in 2008. This is “particularly notable given that Americans’ confidence in the economy and perceptions of the job market are substantially better in 2017 than they were in 2009.”

 

One thing that is driving down our well-being is our declining mental and emotional health, says Dan Witters, research director of the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index.

 

“It’s an unprecedented worsening … This is nothing like we have ever seen before,” he says.

 

Indeed, depression levels are “the highest we have ever measured,” says Witters. In 2017, nearly one in five (18 percent) of Americans said they had been professionally diagnosed at some point as being depressed. And the numbers of people who said they had recently found little interest or pleasure in doing things increased seven percentage points from the year prior, meaning that 17 million more people now say this. Plus our quality of relationship closeness has worsened.

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How to Identify and Cope With Your PTSD Triggers By Matthew Tull, PhD

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PTSD triggers may be all around you. Even though it may sometimes feel like PTSD symptoms come out-of-the-blue, PTSD symptoms rarely spontaneously occur. Instead, whether you are aware of it not, PTSD symptoms are often triggered or cued by something in our internal (anything that happens within your body such as thoughts or feelings) or external (anything that happens outside your body, such as a stressful situation) environment.

 

Because certain thoughts, feelings, or situations can bring up uncomfortable PTSD symptoms, such as memories of a traumatic event or feelings of being on edge and anxious, one way of coping with these symptoms is by increasing your awareness of these triggers. You can prevent or lessen the impact of certain PTSD symptoms by identifying what specific types of thoughts, feelings, and situations trigger them, and then, take steps to limit the occurrence or impact of those triggers.

 

Kinds of Triggers

Triggers can fall into two categories: Internal Triggers and External Triggers. Internal triggers are things that you feel or experience inside your body. Internal triggers include thoughts or memories, emotions, and bodily sensations (for example, your heart racing). External triggers are situations, people, or places that you might encounter throughout your day (or things that happen outside your body).

 

Listed below are some common internal and external triggers.

Internal Triggers
Anger
Anxiety
Sadness
Memories
Feeling lonely
Feeling abandoned
Frustration
Feeling out of control
Feeling vulnerable
Racing heartbeat
Pain
Muscle tension

External Triggers
An argument
Seeing a news article that reminds you of your traumatic event
Watching a movie or television show that reminds you of your traumatic event
Seeing a car accident
Certain smells
The end of a relationship
An anniversary
Holidays
A specific place
Seeing someone who reminds you of a person connected to your traumatic event
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Gratitude and paying attention?

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I don’t have to chase extraordinary moments to find happiness.

 

 

It’s right in front of me

 

if I’m paying attention

 

and practicing gratitude.

 

– Brené Brown
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Sounds like awareness and gratitude are important.

 

I would add some giving to complete the menu.
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Why do people staring at me impact my life so negatively?

 

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I share this with a feeling of extreme embarrassment.

 

 

It seems so mundane, so ridiculous on paper, but in real life, it is my invisible prison.

 

 

Why does this seem to have such a negative influence, such an enormous power, such a quick, catastrophizing affect.

 

 

A childhood filled with constant criticism, extreme physical violence and harsh abuse, lives just beneath the surface of my consciousness.

 

 

I was a thing to my father, like the owner of a fighting pit bull. My worth was how good I made him look playing sports.

 

 

I had a big nose as a kid, which made me a target for ridicule, shame and unwanted attention.

 

 

Add this experience to my fathers abuse and my trauma manifests as social anxiety.

 

 

These two situations dominated my childhood, nowhere was I safe.

 

 

Catastrophic loss seems possible for me, when it explodes.

 

 

My C-PTSD came from this sick childhood.

 

 

Cognitively, I know all of this is irrational, transparent and impossible.

 

 

Knowing does not eliminate hypervigilance, anxiety, fear or shame!

 

 

They run on their own without conscious influence or control.

 

 

If I spend time thinking about any of this, it grows.

 

 

My job is to Meditate, slow the mind, focus it, and then let all these judgments and thoughts pass on by.

 

 

The most I have to fear is my own reaction to this stimuli.

 

 

No matter what, living fully and happily is my goal, not isolation or hiding for safety.

 

 

Thoughts? I have decided to share my journey in more detail as ptsd resurfaces in my life.
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