Archive for the ‘Chronic Pain’ Category

Chronic pain: rewritten as a resource for the top of blog page…

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things i never heard from my pain specialists.. doctors and pain psychologists/// Why????
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chronic pain differs from acute pain; that unlike acute pain, chronic pain doesn’t represent harm.
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Pain has to go through the mind: the anterior cingulate cortex, which registers pain’s unpleasant character.”
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simply becoming mindful of one’s emotional response to pain decreases its unpleasantness and improves functioning, and because meditation had been shown to reduce the unpleasantness of acute pain by almost 60 percent (making meditation by some measures superior even to morphine)
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Research shows, for example, that how we interpret the meaning of pain has a dramatic impact on our ability to tolerate it.
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No one ever told me, throwing away my opioids, undertaking intense aerobic exercise till exhaustion would transform my pain.
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No one informed me that any attention I gave my pain would increase it.
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No one ever imagined pain could be impacted, diminished, changed, and altered for me.
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After the operations, nerve killings and meds, after the doctors handed my body back over to me, I was left with enough pain to ruin my existence.
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My pain has changed from dominating my life with suffering to an annoyance (I do not suffer now).
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Bringing my pain out to play while exercising, altered my relationship with it. Now I know that this change happened in the anterior cingulate cortex area of the brain.
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Aerobic exercise, meditation and attitude can devour a big portion of your suffering/
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Accepting Emotional Pain ///undefeated mind

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Though the experience of physical pain and emotional pain are clearly different, functional imaging studies show that, with few exceptions, the regions of the brain that these types of pain activate are identical.
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These include not only the regions responsible for giving pain its unpleasant character, but also those responsible for regulating its size, location, and intensity (perhaps partially explaining the startling finding that Tylenol, a centrally acting pain reliever, alleviates not only the pain of a smashed finger but also the pain of hurt feelings.)
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No wonder, then, that physical and emotional pain produce the same reaction: a strong desire to avoid the things that cause them.
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The Undefeated Mind: Meditation and Pain People

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Ayle Permata Sari
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Because studies had shown that simply becoming mindful of one’s emotional response to pain decreases its unpleasantness and improves functioning, and because meditation had been shown to reduce the unpleasantness of acute pain by almost 60 percent (making meditation by some measures superior even to morphine), she first began teaching him how to meditate.
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In my opinion and much stated beliefs:
Any attention we give our pain, increases it, period.
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Chronic pain can be compressed, changed, altered with effort, aerobic exercise and attitude. more to follow:
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.. this is the mindfulness based therapy I used for pain and PTSD

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Undefeated Mind:
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“Acceptance and commitment therapy proposes that by fully surrendering to pain, the sufferer can paradoxically prevent himself from being defeated by it.
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Such acceptance, his therapist had said, while having little power to decrease his pain, might have great power to decrease his suffering.
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For one thing, accepting his pain might enable him to stop making futile efforts to avoid it and perhaps to start doing things he wanted, like going back to work.
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Also, she suggested, clinging to the possibility that he might still avoid his pain could also be engendering fear—fear that he might not avoid his pain—which could actually be intensifying the unpleasantness of his pain”.
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This works for trauma fears also.
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even more pain

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“This seems to be true even when pain represents both benefit and harm, as anesthesiologist Henry Beecher found during World War II when he observed that 75 percent of soldiers with severe battlefield injuries—broken bones and torn limbs—reported experiencing only minor pain (even going so far as to decline morphine) because of what their injuries signified: they were going home.
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Studies have further shown that expecting pain to be severe worsens our experience of it, and expecting it to be mild improves it.
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Further, being psychologically braced for pain also lessens its unpleasantness.
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This is true regardless of its cause, whether it’s from a medical procedure done for our benefit, or from torture (even though pain caused with the intent to harm has been shown to hurt more than pain caused incidentally or accidentally).”
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more pain: Undefeated Mind

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“Even if the physical sensation of pain remains constant, our “affective reaction” to it—how much it makes us suffer—will vary tremendously depending on several factors.
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Research shows, for example, that how we interpret the meaning of pain has a dramatic impact on our ability to tolerate it.
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In one study, subjects reported pain they believed represented tissue damage to be more intense than pain they believed didn’t, possibly explaining why women rate cancer pain as more unpleasant than labor pain even when their intensities are the same.
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Not only that, but when we focus on the benefit of pain (when one exists), we’re actually able to reduce its unpleasantness.

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Another study showed that women in labor who focused primarily on their impending delivery rated the unpleasantness of their pain half that felt by women who focused primarily on their pain.”
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Part two pain…complexities!!!!

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We know this is how the brain experiences pain because of imaging studies and because patients who’ve had damage to the anterior cingulate cortex feel the sensation of pain but not its unpleasantness.
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That is, they feel pain but aren’t bothered by it (interestingly, in some people, morphine has the same effect).
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When the anterior cingulate cortex isn’t functioning, pain is still experienced but seems to lose its emotional impact and thus its motivating force.
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This finding, that the sensation of pain and the unpleasantness of pain come from distinct neurological processes that occur in different locations within the the brain, explains how a single pain stimulus can cause such subjectively different pain experiences.
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