Archive for the ‘Assorted’ Category

Happiness

IMG_0348

.
.
Happiness in my opinion, is a way of living, feeling, doing, that accompanies us, on our daily journey.
.
If we are able to let go of our fears, guilt and doubt, life opens up with happy becoming visible.
.
Mindfulness allows us to build a powerful focus on the breath, training the mind, to let go of anything cognitive.
.
Without judgment, happiness can be a companion on this journey.
.
Without judgment, thoughts fade, emotions evaporate, the brilliance of now, explodes, and opportunity abounds.
.
The ego’s lair is the dog house on a colossal mansion estate, the true self and real power of our being.
.
Realize and escape from the small, confined space of the ego.
.
Free yourself from these barriers, let go, risk, live fully, smile, laugh.
.
.
.
.

Shaila Catherine

FullSizeRender 10

.
.
“Find an experience that is pleasant: looking at a sunrise, feeling the smooth fur of a cat, holding a warm cup of tea, or any other such simple thing.
.
Practice moving the attention between the object and the pleasant feeling it elicits.
.
Shift your attention between the object of pleasure (the visual image, feeling of warmth or softness) and the pleasurable feeling it evokes.
.
Practice allowing the attention to settle within the experience of pleasantness without adding attachment.
.
If the desire for more arises, notice that attachment.
.
Ask yourself—what is this feeling of attachment?
.
Does attachment increase the pleasure, or decrease it?
.
Many people will recognize attachment by a characteristic feeling of contraction or separation.
.
How do you notice attachment to pleasure as distinct from a simple experience of pleasure?
.
.

Ricard: “Happiness”

IMG_0375

.
.
Authentic happiness is not linked to an activity; it is a state of being, a profound emotional balance struck by a subtle understanding of how the mind functions.
.
.
While ordinary pleasures are produced by contact with pleasant objects and end when that contact is broken, sukha (happiness) —lasting well-being—is felt so long as we remain in harmony with our inner nature.
.
.
One intrinsic aspect of it is selflessness, which radiates from within rather than focusing on the self.
.
.
One who is at peace with herself will contribute spontaneously to establishing peace within her family, her neighborhood, and, circumstances permitting, society at large.
.
.
In brief, there is no direct relationship between pleasure and happiness.
.
.
This distinction does not suggest that we mustn’t seek out pleasurable sensations.
.
.
There is no reason to deprive ourselves of the enjoyment of a magnificent landscape, of swimming in the sea, or of the scent of a rose.
.
.
Pleasures become obstacles only when they upset the mind’s equilibrium and lead to an obsession with gratification or an aversion to anything that thwarts them.
.
.
.

Ricard: HAPPINESS AND PLEASURE: THE GREAT MIX-UP

IMG_0341.PNG

.
.
.
The most common error is to confuse pleasure for happiness.
.
.
Pleasure, says the Hindu proverb, “is only the shadow of happiness.”
.
.
It is the direct result of pleasurable sensual, esthetic, or intellectual stimuli.
.
.
The fleeting experience of pleasure is dependent upon circumstance, on a specific location or moment in time.
.
.
It is unstable by nature, and the sensation it evokes soon becomes neutral or even unpleasant.
.
.
Likewise, when repeated it may grow insipid or even lead to disgust; savoring a delicious meal is a source of genuine pleasure, but we are indifferent to it once we’ve had our fill and would get sick of it if we continued eating.
.
.
It is the same thing with a nice wood fire: coming in from the cold, it is pure pleasure to warm ourselves by it, but we soon have to move away if we don’t want to burn ourselves.
.
.
Pleasure is exhausted by usage, like a candle consuming itself.
.
.
It is almost always linked to an activity and naturally leads to boredom by dint of being repeated.
.
.
Listening rapturously to a Bach prelude requires a focus of attention that, minimal as it is, cannot be maintained indefinitely.
.
.
After a while fatigue kicks in and the music loses its charm.
.
.
Were we forced to listen for days on end, it would become unbearable. .
.
.
Furthermore pleasure is an individual experience, most often centered on the self, which is why it can easily descend into selfishness and sometimes conflict with the well-being of others.
.
.
In sexual intimacy there can certainly be mutual pleasure through giving and receiving pleasurable sensations, but such pleasure can transcend the self and contribute to genuine happiness only if the very nature of mutuality and generous altruism lies at its core.
.
.
You can experience pleasure at somebody else’s expense, but you can never derive happiness from it.
.
.
Pleasure can be joined to cruelty, violence, pride, greed, and other mental conditions that are incompatible with true happiness.
.
.

Pleasure and Happiness

FullSizeRender 2

.
.
“Pleasure is the happiness of madmen,
.
.

.
while happiness is the pleasure of sages,”
.

.
.
Jules Barbey d’Aurevilly
.
.
.

Simple: simplicity is the path

FullSizeRender 7

*
*
*
Simplicity is the word of the day.
*
*
When judgments rush in, simply let them go, return focus on the breath for a cycle or two.
*
*
Simple in awareness, unencumbered by complex cognition, life unfolds in vivid color.
*
*
Simple in deed. Let go of thought when working. Enter the task at hand. Immerse yourself in the minutia, the inner workings of this skill.
*
*
If preparing a meal, become the knife. Cut deliberately, cut to make the best meal with the current ingredients. Enter the task.
*
*
Slow the pace, enter the task, be present, vividly aware,,alive. All senses engaged, smell,,listen, touch, see, let go.
*
*
Practice.
*
*
Be the Karate Kid, wax on wax off.
*

*
It is not the complexity of the mind that finds happiness, it is inside the simplicity of being below thought, emotion, and judgment, that makes life and happiness available.
*
*
Athletes, artists, etc. have accomplished this by entering skills a million times. Example: hitting a baseball, shooting a basketball, playing a piano until it becomes part of the body, getting lost in creative sculpting or painting.
*
*

The Heart of Meditation: Techniques

IMG_0340

.
.
We use techniques in meditation for a very simple reason: most of us, at least when we begin meditation, need support for our mind.
.
.
A technique provides a place for the mind to rest while it settles back down into its essential nature.
.
.
That’s all a technique is really, a kind of cushion for the mind.
.
.
No meditation technique is an end in itself, and no matter which technique you use, it will eventually dissolve when your meditation deepens.
.
.
.

%d bloggers like this: