Archive for the ‘Assorted’ Category

Dealing with Panic, worry and doubt

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When panic arrives surrender to it!

Avoiding triggers at all cost describes most of our behavior. Unfortunately this fuels depression, anxiety and PTSD.

Fear can grow to massive proportions inside our head.

Our panic (Fear) for the most part is irrational.

We can only quarantine ourselves and abide by the guidelines, after that more worry and doubt harms us.

We have an opportunity in this crisis to change our relationship with worry, doubt and fear.

For once my daughter asked why I am so calm during this pandemic?

I am usually the one with my mind working overtime, worrying every minute, consumed.

Practice has enabled me to let the extra worry and doubt go.

It takes no more time, in fact it creates time wasted worrying.

It is simple as possible.

Specifically we accept, then surrender to our worry and panic when it arrives.

We slow our nervous system using the breath, then focus on calming the heart, listening for the quietest sound.

Negative thoughts and emotions are the Enemy.

We battle them by withholding attention, time in our consciousness.

Unless we are aware of these negative thoughts and emotions proliferating, we suffer.

Paying attention takes no more time and costs nothing.

Awareness is always first, followed by acceptance then surrendering everything we fear and deny.

Lots of free time and opportunity.

Choices we make will determine the next few months.

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Abandon what is not yours?

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Excerpt from “Focused and Fearless”

Some people fear that letting go could diminish the quality of their lives, health, abilities, achievements, or personal property.

To this, the Buddha said, “Whatever is not yours, abandon it; when you have abandoned it, that will lead to your welfare and happiness for a long time.”

This invites a profound reflection on what one can authentically claim as one’s own.

As we discern the impermanent, conditioned character of all material and mental processes, we eliminate perceptions, sensory experience, and material things as fields for possession.

On the surface it seems like we are asked to give up everything, but simultaneously comes the realization that there is actually nothing possessed and consequently nothing that can actually be given up.

The great abandonment is to let go of the concept of ownership.

Letting go in meditation is the relinquishment that involves no loss.

Recognizing impermanence leads to the realization of the pure and ungraspable nature of things.

Knowing this basic fact of things, one has nothing to fear.

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PTSD and this Pamdemic!!!!!

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PTSD does not like more fear, quarantine or a pandemic!!!

Having idle time can be disastrous for PTSD, anxiety or depression.

Our biggest challenge, do not dissociate into the past or future. That means stop ruminating (thinking).

If we need to think, we direct our thought and leave out I, me Mine sentences. Be neutral as possible for a month.

We need to work on being grateful, then humble. Have goals like these to emulate.

Let the “I”, our “Ego” take a back seat. Limit his/her time in control of your mind.

Refuse to entertain judgments for a month. We can make decisions later, let go of all the extra worry this pamdemic has delivered.

If we do not accept this pandemic, surrender to these restrictions, the victim inside us will prosper.

Our “Ego” wants to blame, feel victimized and helpless.

Remember we all wither and die, so revisit your goals in life.

Some people are going to die. If it is us, do we want to suffer more because how we think?

I live with my daughter and three grandkids. My goal is to be positive and supportive of them.

We lead by example not words or thoughts.

We can not let negative thoughts, worry or doubt camp inside our mind.

We need not be perfect, but have the ability to let go of the noise and come back to now, when needed.

Accept the anxiety, sit quietly and breathe into it.

Observe it and watch it fade. Feel your body settle, cortisol and adrenaline dissipate.

This is our challenge with PTSD.

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Do not let them camp out in your head!

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We go to great lengths to protect our possessions. We close and lock our doors and windows, maybe add a security system for extra protection.

With all this energy and concern, why do we not guard our mind with the same diligence.

This is one of my bad habits from childhood. An outside threat can dominate my thoughts, occupy my mind in totality.

My childhood abuse heightened my sense of self, needing to be perfect, thoughts would consume my being.

Any criticism or threat was elevated to a level of near annihilation within minutes. Sensitive, I have to admit and it is embarrassing to realize its impact.

My fears drugs were always present, so criticism easily excited my being.

Now, I refuse to let my attention be consumed by another’s actions.

Yesterday, a neighbor emailed a nasty message about my screaming grandkids.

Quarantine is causing some to lose their cool.

Now, attacking my grandkids is one of the few attachments, I care deeply about.

In the past this situation would consume my thoughts.

Life would revolve around this upset.

I have learned that letting this situation camp out in my mind, is an invisible prison I have inhabited way too much.

I have learned to keep my mind clear of this poison.

Let others own their own problems.

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I visualize slowing my ♥️ heart way down

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At times my meditation focuses on the physical impact of the breath. I let thoughts and emotions fade on their own without attention.

Slowing the breath, slows the heart rate and blood pressure, calms the nervous system. Muscles relax, gravity increases as we let go.

I know this is the safest, most secure place I can be. My inner guide has more control during my meditative sits.

Surrendering has become second nature when I meditate.

I try to stop my heart by being as quiet as possible. All my focus centers on my body sensations and sounds.

My hearing searches for the sound of the heartbeat, the sound of an inhale and exhale.

I hear an orchestra playing inside my head at times, listening inside my eardrums. The body makes sounds, listen intently, concentrate.

The inner world is mysterious.

My words can not relay the power held within this world.

It must be experienced.

Sit quietly today, explore your inner world.

Hard to say, you have no time to try during this quarantine.

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The faster the mind goes, the more awareness is lost!

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Notice the speed of your mind, the speed at which thoughts arrive, the speed of your nervous system and the strength of our emotions.

This maybe an extended quarantine, so having the ability to let the noise, worry and fear go, is of great benefit.

Have gratitude, many , many more people are suffering around the world.

I have doubt, worry and fear but I refuse to give it more attention. Limit the noise, these distractions.

Realize worry and doubt compromises our wellbeing, weakens our immune system and lets our “Ego” control the mind.

These are simple battles that change our mindset.

Discount any strong emotions for a month, play defense.

Defense is making no decisions, giving no weight to negativity or chaos.

We just let the noise go, then follow our senses to this present moment.

In this moment, right now, I can be happy or at least enjoy the beautiful tree blooming.

If we let worry nullify nature and any positivity, we will suffer.

We need to stay present so much more now. Refuse to ruminate about the past or worry about the future.

Until new information comes out in this pandemic, no need for me to think about it.

When something changes, I will adapt but as of now, Surviving means letting go and being present.

These are simple actions that change everything.

We do not have to be perfect but we can catch ourselves lost in worry, then adjust and let go.

Think of ways to helps others, spreading kindness in creative ways.

We have the internet to reach out and spread kindness.

Many choices during this pandemic.

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Anxious people are drawn to the calm, the strength.

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Example: On successful professional sports teams, there is a leader, an Individual who others look up to. This person controls the emotional well being of that team.

In times of extreme stress he/she demonstrates confidence, calm and strength. Other players perform much better having this leadership to lean on.

Are you the leader in your family, in an online community or giving support through your blog.

Anxious people are drawn to the calm, the strength.

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Nando Parrado and Roberto Canessa (sitting) with Chilean arriero Sergio Catalán

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Adversity (pandemic) is part of life, either accept the challenge or be a victim.

This choice decides if we suffer or thrive under these extreme circumstances.

I look what other humans have done in dangerous situations.

The wreck was located in the remote Andes Mountains in far western Argentina, near the border with Chile. The broken fuselage came to rest at an elevation of 3,570 metres (11,710 ft). Three crew members and more than a quarter of the passengers died in the crash, and several others soon died due to the frigid temperatures and their serious injuries.

Area of the crash. The dotted green line is the survivors’ descent route. They trekked about 38 km (24 mi) over 10 days.

Authorities immediately began searching for the aircraft, and flew over the crash site several times, but could not see the white fuselage against the snow. Search efforts were canceled after eight days.

During the next 72 days, 13 more passengers died. The remaining survivors reluctantly resorted to cannibalism.

Nando Parrado and Roberto Canessa climbed a 4,650 metres (15,260 ft) mountain peak without gear and hiked for 10 days into Chile. On December 23, 1972, 72 days after the crash, 16 survivors were rescued.

The captain of that rugby team lead them until the search was called off, then he faltered. Everyone involved in the plane crash gave up except one, Nando Parrado.

A new leader, a visionary with a spirit to never give up emerged (Nando). It happens and sometimes these leaders seem as followers on the team until adversity uncovers their strength and ability to survive.

His mantra, “As long as I have a breath, I will die one step closer to my father.” None of the others had the insight and courage to know hiking out was the only way to live.

Filmed from rescue helicopter

They were never going to try to hike out. Death was only a few weeks away and they were frozen by fear and exhaustion.

They were brave and did things to survive, Nando just rose up and did something impossible to all others.

“A Miracle in the Andes” it has been labeled forever.

16 people were saved because of ones mans determination and courage. It was impossible what he and Roberto Cannessa accomplished. Seasoned mountaineers with gear could hardly navigate their journey.

Remember it was in the 90’s when they departed Montevideo. Dressed for summer, they ended up stranded in the high Andes.

Now our challenge is this pandemic.

How will you look back on your time in quarantine?

Were you a mess or did you project calm and strength to those around you?

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