Triggers part two,,2,,

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Let’s be realistic about our expectations. Our healing path will have set backs, frustrating results, intense anxiety mixed with fear.

 

Our trauma (PTSD) has access to our fight or flight mechanism. A trigger thought, a sound or smell ignites our fight or flight mechanism. We are preparing for a lethal threat from the past, but none currently exists.

 

PTSD is a mirage, a stored implicit memory of trauma. The physical changes and drugs our body secretes are real.

 

There is no real danger, just our own defense mechanism. Hopefully, this wisdom helps us resist avoiding, ruminating or freezing (shutting down).

 

In my mindfulness group, if someone is triggered, I trace five slow, intense breaths with them. Eyes open, I sit across from them, tracing the breathing track together.

 

I reassure them of their safety, using slow breaths to dissipate the cortisol and adrenaline. They are instructed to let go of the storyline and absorb the cortisol with their slow exhales.

 

It may take five or more breaths. They realize you can impact PTSD fear and anxiety.

 

It surprises them when things calm a bit. The intense fear and anxiety can be influenced.

 

PTSD loses some power each time we focus, let go and breathe deeply.

 

Our fearful thoughts and judgments soften and fade.


Each time we let the storyline go, we inch closer to wellbeing.

 


This is when PTSD is at its strongest, triggering the fight or flight mechanism. We fear triggers so much we avoid people and situations that ignite our trauma.

 


This is also the time when PTSD is at its most vulnerable.

 

If you can entertain the thought that PTSD is a bluff, that no real power or danger is present, healing is possible.

 


If we can stay present, focused, PTSD loses power.

 

 

You will discover no real danger exists inside our defense mechanism.

 

 

With practice we can learn to accept the anxious, scary mechanism as normal.

 

 

My fight or flight mechanism does not fire around my triggers anymore.

 


You can also integrate your trauma and calm your nervous system!

 

 

Start at the bottom right corner. Trace upwards your slow deep inhale. Next we pause to let oxygen absorb into the lungs. Feel the energy, the pressure holding this breath in.

Then slow downward exhale, focus and feel your body absorb this anxiety. Next the final pause to balance the breath.  Feel the calm let the storyline go.

Repeat.

 

 

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Adrenal stress response or fight, flight or freeze mechanism:

Tunnel Vision: One’s field of vision narrows and tunnels into the perceived threat. Auditory Exclusion: The hearing tends to shut off. Loss of fine motor skills: Often only gross motor functions are possible under the adrenal state. Tai-chi-Psyche: Everything seems to move in slow motion. Increased heart rate, blood pressure and respiration. Coagulants and pain killers are also dumped into the bloodstream.

 

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