Name your Chronic Pain, give him/her physical traits, then go to war

48E93662-D1E4-4BED-836E-49858CD39C01

.
.
“For many patients, what’s worse is the invisible nature of their condition.” ‘You can’t see pain, and this is a very big thing for these people,’ says Gustin.
.
.
.
My two cents: I spent a year in a 15 person chronic pain group. Mostly serious spinal injury people taking on average 30 plus pills a day. Collectively, we feared our pain, we suffered without hope of a cure.

 

Opioids worked at first then faded with daily use. As time went on, it took more opioids to accomplish the same relief. Chronic Pain was winning this battle with the group.

 

I thought my pain levels placed me somewhere in the middle of the group. The only solace was being thankful I was not as bad as many in the group.

 

Eventually, I threw my pills away and named my pain. My goal was to battle my pain as the enemy. I found it near impossible to fight an invisible enemy.

 


It was like air, no form, invisible but very powerful. I named my pain Mister ”P”, like Mister Cunningham (Mister “C”) on Happy Days.

 


Most people in the pain group feared their pain, described it as powerful. We were all victims I concluded after a couple of months. I refused to be a victim and rebelled against the group.

 


I did the opposite, I cussed Mr “P” and belittled him during my workouts. Being a former professional baseball player, I used my strengths to fight this demon.

 

 

I walked, bringing Mr “P” out to play. Mr “P” would get aggravated, fire off violently, trying to get me to stop. The battle had commenced.

 

 

My body would rage with my chronic pain as I continued to walk, focused on my pain and my legs. Mr. “P” wanted to stop my legs from moving.


My whole being resisted these impulses.


With the help of some music with a steady beat, heard through small headphones, my legs would not give in. I walked another 15 minutes everyday.

 

After a couple of weeks of this my pain started to compress. Later, I would find out that pain is read two places in the brain. The pain itself and another area which is a coloring agent.


In this part of the brain,  pain can grow or compress and diminish.

 

As my pain diminished, my relationship with pain changed. I did not fear it or think about it anymore.

 

What once controlled my life, became more of an inconvenience, a body function to be managed.

 

Chronic pain is different and can be diminished with work and attitude.
.
.

.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: