Trigger warning: from the book “Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness”; the devastation!

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“My damage was internal, unseen. I carry it with me. You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice, until today.”

 

On June 2, 2016, these words were spoken by a 23-year-old woman in a California courtroom. She was addressing Brock Turner, a Stanford University student who was facing sentencing after being found guilty of three counts of sexual assault. The night of the attack, Turner—then nineteen and a member of Stanford’s swim team—had been chased down and apprehended by two international graduate students. They’d witnessed Turner accosting a half-naked, unconscious woman outside of a party on campus—the same woman now standing before him in court.

 

“I stood there examining my body beneath the stream of water,” the woman continued, relaying her experience in emergency care, “and decided I don’t want my body anymore. I was terrified of it . . . I wanted to take off my body like a jacket and leave it at the hospital with everything else.”
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My two cents: I wanted to share how extreme ptsd and anxiety can be.

 

You can heal from this space or from a concentration camp or a war with daily work.

 

 

This work is not for the faint of  heart, it takes courage and discipline to battle this kind of trauma.
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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by Laurie on May 15, 2018 at 12:10 am

    Oh My Gosh!

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