The Body Keeps Score: epigenetics

A Sock Mystery at my house.   Onesies.

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One of the most cited experiments in epigenetics was conducted by McGill University researcher Michael Meaney, who studies newborn rat pups and their mothers.
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He discovered that how much a mother rat licks and grooms her pups during the first twelve hours after their birth permanently affects the brain chemicals that respond to stress—and modifies the configuration of over a thousand genes.
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The rat pups that are intensively licked by their mothers are braver and produce lower levels of stress hormones under stress than rats whose mothers are less attentive.
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They also recover more quickly—an equanimity that lasts throughout their lives.
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They develop thicker connections in the hippocampus, a key center for learning and memory, and they perform better in an important rodent skill—finding their way through mazes.
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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by Jennifertem on October 4, 2017 at 12:24 pm

    Seems early bonding so important in our emotional development.
    I was separated at birth from my mother for one month. Premature in times where not held much. Never felt a closeness until adult.

    ….perhaps same colored socks for boys?

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