The Inner Critic from the book “In Touch”. Part Two

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Judging always creates distance within yourself and between yourself and others.
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For example, if you believe that you should not be experiencing a difficult feeling such as anger, shame, or fear, you will not give your full affectionate attention to it.
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You will ignore it, push it away, or try to change it. The same process of refusal applies to others.
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If you believe that others should not be as they are, you will also try to ignore them, keep them at a distance, or change them.
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On the other hand, if you approach your life with the question, “What is actually happening?” you will have a very different experience.
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Judging always creates alienation. Nonjudgmental, affectionate attention fosters intimacy and understanding.
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Judging is different from discerning. Judging is about determining what is right or wrong, good or bad.
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Discerning is about clear seeing.
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Letting go of our judgments does not mean that we lose discernment. In fact, judging is a distortion of discernment.
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Once we are able to see through the mind’s tendency to judge everything dualistically, in terms of good and bad and right and wrong, we are actually much freer to see things as they are and respond appropriately.
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