Happiness: Matthew Ricard ; pleasure

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Unlike pleasure, genuine flourishing may be influenced by circumstance, but it isn’t dependent on it.
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It does not mutate into its opposite but endures and grows with experience.
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It imparts a sense of fulfillment that in time becomes second nature.
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Authentic happiness is not linked to an activity; it is a state of being, a profound emotional balance struck by a subtle understanding of how the mind functions.
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While ordinary pleasures are produced by contact with pleasant objects and end when that contact is broken, sukha—lasting well-being—is felt so long as we remain in harmony with our inner nature.
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One intrinsic aspect of it is selflessness, which radiates from within rather than focusing on the self.
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One who is at peace with herself will contribute spontaneously to establishing peace within her family, her neighborhood, and, circumstances permitting, society at large.
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In brief, there is no direct relationship between pleasure and happiness.
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This distinction does not suggest that we mustn’t seek out pleasurable sensations.
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