“The Negativity Bias of Memory: Excerpt From: Hanson, Rick. “Buddha’s Brain.”

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“But here’s the problem: your brain preferentially scans for, registers, stores, recalls, and reacts to unpleasant experiences; as we’ve said, it’s like Velcro for negative experiences and Teflon for positive ones.
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Consequently, even when positive experiences outnumber negative ones, the pile of negative implicit memories naturally grows faster.
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Then the background feeling of what it feels like to be you can become undeservedly glum and pessimistic.
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Sure, negative experiences do have benefits: loss opens the heart, remorse provides a moral compass, anxiety alerts you to threats, and anger spotlights wrongs that should be righted.
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But do you really think you’re not having enough negative experiences?!
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Emotional pain with no benefit to yourself or others is pointless suffering.
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And pain today breeds more pain tomorrow.
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For instance, even a single episode of major depression can reshape circuits of the brain to make future episodes more likely (Maletic et al. 2007).
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The remedy is not to suppress negative experiences; when they happen, they happen.”
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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by thefeatheredsleep on November 12, 2015 at 1:26 am

    Superb

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