Is risk part of living

 

 

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“It is only by risking ourselves from one hour to another that we live at all.”

 

—WILLIAM JAMES
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My two cents: Richard Pryor did a joke about overcoming the “Ultimate Test”, living forever, which he says no one has ever succeeded.

 

We all die, same hour, same minute, same second, whether we worry constantly or enjoy the journey!

 

 

It is our choice!

 

 

Not risking will not grant you one more minute on this planet.

 

 

Not risking steals part of life, living.

 

 

i know, not risking is failure.   Maximum attitude and effort  is living.

 

 

What lesson will your actions impart to your children?
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Focus on letting go

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Let go, let it fade, be present.

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A gift for our children ____________?

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The gift is a mindfulness practice.

 

 

A place to establish self confidence, humility and inner peace.

 

 

Mindfulness improves emotional regulation, offers them a safe place to handle stress, pain, thoughts, peer pressure, child abuse, etc..

 

 

It is a vacation, an oasis away from judgments and negative thoughts during our awkward adolescent development.

 

 

ADHD and at risk kids have a practice, a skill to help build focus and help soothe their anxiety, fear, problems.

 

 

Mindfulness lasts a lifetime without a financial cost.

 

 

Practice with your children on this elevated plane, share this spiritual, inner peace journey.
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This is known as dysregulated arousal

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In trauma-sensitive mindfulness, the variable we’re interested in here is arousal—defined as our basic readiness for life. Arousal originates in the brain stem, activates our ANS, and helps us respond to the demands of the world.

 

 

If we need energy to do something, such as get out of bed or pick up our child, arousal increases; when we rest, it decreases.

 

 

Trauma, meanwhile, creates acute arousal.

 

 

With fight or flight, our bodies hit the accelerator. We experience a burst of exceedingly high arousal.

 

If we then freeze, our bodies slam on the brakes.

 

 

With posttraumatic stress, arousal can end up fluctuating wildly between these two extremes.

 

Both pedals effectively remain slammed to the floor.

 

 

This is known as dysregulated arousal—a state where our ability to self-regulate becomes seriously compromised.

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Kindness

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“Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.”

 

-Mark Twain
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My two cents: Kindness needs no thought, no judgment, in fact kindness operates best without thought or judgment.

 

 

Let your heart read people who need a helping hand, a kind gesture, a friendly smile.
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decreased volume of gray matter in the amygdala,

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“Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness”

 

Mindfulness practice has also been associated with decreased volume of gray matter in the amygdala, which decreases reactivity to trauma-relevant triggers.

 

 

 

In an eight-week study, individuals who participated in a mindfulness-based program were reported to have significantly less perceived stress and reductions in the amygdala gray matter density.

 

 

In other studies, meditators have shown decreased physiological reactivity after being exposed to a stressor, and a lower amygdala response to emotional stimulation during meditation.

 

 

Following in the footsteps of these researchers, the group found that these changes transferred to nonmeditative states—that the decrease in amygdala activity occurred following meditation as well.

 

 

More generally, mindfulness meditation has also been shown to activate areas of the prefrontal cortex involved in emotional regulation.

 

 

There are several theories as to why mindfulness decreases amygdala activity and improves emotional regulation, including the idea that our enhanced ability to regulate attention is an important resource when we’re confronted with stressful events.

 

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Abusive childhoods have a big, nasty inner Critic!!!!!!

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Bring your inner critic out before you sit (Meditate).

 

 

Listen to the criticism, hear without grasping, feel without internalizing.

 

 

Hug your inner critic, he/she is just trying to protect us, he/she believes.

 

 

Let the storyline alone, envision inner peace filling your lungs, soothing the inner critic.

 

 

We are not destroying the inner critic, we are engulfing him/her in an approval bath.

 

 

Soothe your inner critic with inner peace, approval and acceptance.

 

 

Put your hand over your body part that identifies with your inner critic (solar plexus, stomach, throat, or between the shoulder blades).

 

 

You are fine, secure, safe and perfect.

 

 

My inner critic has the angry, emotional voice of my father.

 

 

I understand his judgment was not accurate, kind or humane.

 

 

In this moment, right now, I bathe in inner peace and acceptance.

 

 

No dialogue or thought is involved in this specific practice.
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