Worry Quote

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“Worry is a misuse of imagination.”

Dan Zadra

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My two cents: Worry can occupy all our senses, rob of us of a chance to live fully.

Worry or not, we die same day, same hour.

Worry has little benefit then!

We can train the mind to let most worry go.

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Sōji-ji — Reading the Sutras

The video I found mesmerizing, and powerful. What focus and energy!

Buddhism now

Soji-jiSōji-ji is one of two daihonzan (Head temples) of the Sōtō school of Zen Buddhism. The other is Eihei-ji.

The chanting is all in Japanese.

Hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

Soji-ji

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Adapt your Affirmation to fit your needs

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In this moment, right now, I accept all of me, my successes and my mistakes, the good and the not so good, and the kind, giving me at my core.

These words resonate for me. Adapt your affirmation with ones that reverberate for you.

I used to say, I accept all of me. That does not resonate like this new one. Accepting my mistakes is the specific word for me.

Abstract (accepting all of me) does not have the impact of specific, emotional descriptions (Mistakes, losses, embarrassment, jealousy, resentment, etc).

What bothers you?

What do you need to accept?

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Why Meditate? Matthew Ricard: A dedication

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May the positive energy created not only by this meditation

but by all our words, deeds and thoughts ——- past, present and future———

help relieve suffering of beings now and in the future.

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Attitude

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Think about the attitude, personality and energy we bring to others.

Think about how differently we treat friends and people we do not like or get along with.

We are responsible for how we interact with others.

Can we give up talking about others, gossiping in a harmful manner.

Kindness to others is a boomerang. Are you seen as a friendly, kind person who has a smile and greeting for others?

Build the “Ego” around being a kind, considerate person to others.

Recognize the importance of giving, connected intimately to the core of happiness.

Can we refrain from being right all the time, can we not respond to criticism?

Can we give up being angry about petty things, using that time to be free and focused.

We can practice meditating, building focus, creating a space between stimulus and response.

Others actions should not automatically elicit an emotional response.

We have control of our reactions and behavior.

Can we take a breath, focus, then let go of anger, resentment, jealousy or depression?

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Ricard again: pursuing a happy life

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“We willingly spend a dozen years in school, then go on to college or professional training for several more; we work out at the gym to stay healthy; we spend a lot of time enhancing our comfort, our wealth, and our social status.

We put a great deal into all this, and yet we do so little to improve the inner condition that determines the very quality of our lives.

What strange hesitancy, fear, or apathy stops us from looking within ourselves, from trying to grasp the true essence of joy and sadness, desire and hatred?”

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My two cents: Do we understand what a “Happy” life looks like?

It is not the pursuit of pleasure, the avoidance of critism or the desire for approval.

Happiness flows out of an internal way of being, a way of being grateful for what you have and a desire to help others on this journey.

Happiness may not be a euphoric, blissful condition, but a moment to moment awareness of our mundane life.

An acceptance of ourselves, totally in this mundane moment, is required.

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Limiting Pains impact

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This came up in the mindfulness group. A painful knee injury was disrupting a life.

First thing we do is use our breath to focus. We take our breath into the center of our pain. In this instance, take your breath inside that knee and hang out for twenty slow breaths.

Without judgment or bias we feel all the pain. We notice it’s strength, it’s qualities, sharp, deep, intense, burning, etc. Does the pain have a color, a shape, a temperament, or an emotional content.

Next, we concentrate on our strongest focus object. For me it is my breath using my model.

Build your intensity, follow your breath, notice how this focus has diminished the quality of the pain. Bringing intense focus elsewhere robs pain of attention, thus lessening its strength.

How we react or refuse to react to our pain impacts its power!

Ask yourself these questions.

Is my pain constant in intensity during the day or does it fluctuates?

Are there things that influence your pain, behaviors, thoughts or emotions?

Am I afraid of my pain? Do I avoid all activities because of pain.

Does pain damage me?

Does pain have emotion. Is it angry at us, punishing us, Mad at us, or is it a neurological reaction.

Pain can be a warning of future damage, if we keep up certain activities. Pain may alert me, my hamstring will suffer damage unless it is rested or given therapy.

Chronic Pain exists but does no damage until it reaches a severe intensity.

My chronic pain does no permanent damage to my being. Chronic Pain does deplete some of my energy daily but that is the extent of it.

I do not fear it or give it any attention. This post has given it more energy than it has received in days.

If you have chronic pain, your ability to limit its impact, directly relates to the quality of life.

Find a way to exercise aerobically to bring out our endorphins.

We can increase or diminish our pain with our attitude and behavior.

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