Posts Tagged ‘PTSD’

Mindfulness and our Relationship with food, diet.

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“I’ve been on a constant diet for the last two decades.
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I’ve lost a total of 789 pounds.
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By all accounts, I should be hanging from a charm bracelet.”
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ERMA BOMBECK
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“Everything you see I owe to spaghetti.”
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SOPHIA LOREN
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Profound change!

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Excerpt from the “The Mindfulness Code”:
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“The ability to profoundly change from the inside out really does exist.”
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Happiness then, is an inside, internal situation.
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We need to discount the value we place on approval and all external stimuli.
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Thought and judgment carry far less importance and no permanence whatsoever.
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Being empty of thought and judgment, being present and living fully is our goal, our path to a happy existence.
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“The Negativity Bias of Memory: Excerpt From: Hanson, Rick. “Buddha’s Brain.”

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“But here’s the problem: your brain preferentially scans for, registers, stores, recalls, and reacts to unpleasant experiences; as we’ve said, it’s like Velcro for negative experiences and Teflon for positive ones.
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Consequently, even when positive experiences outnumber negative ones, the pile of negative implicit memories naturally grows faster.
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Then the background feeling of what it feels like to be you can become undeservedly glum and pessimistic.
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Sure, negative experiences do have benefits: loss opens the heart, remorse provides a moral compass, anxiety alerts you to threats, and anger spotlights wrongs that should be righted.
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But do you really think you’re not having enough negative experiences?!
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Emotional pain with no benefit to yourself or others is pointless suffering.
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And pain today breeds more pain tomorrow.
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For instance, even a single episode of major depression can reshape circuits of the brain to make future episodes more likely (Maletic et al. 2007).
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The remedy is not to suppress negative experiences; when they happen, they happen.”
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Meditating need not be overwhelming!

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Feel the air flow up your nostrils when you inhale. Slow it down, even it out, be your inhale.
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Yes, the mind, the cognitive engine wants to perform complex thought, wants to judge everyone and everything. The Ego desires control through constant input (thought, judgment).
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It takes practice for the mind to let go, to slow down, to be empty and focused on just an inhale.
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Instead of meditating for long periods, focus on a few breaths at a time.
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Meditating seems like a tremendous task only mastered by devout sages. Our connotation sees a monk hidden away in some cave for decades, practicing religiously.
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Mastering one breath seems a better alternative for us common folk.
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It is the same building block for all the sages and Buddhists monks.
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Taking action, even small action, separates those who succeed from those who suffer.
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Small daily action brings significant changes.
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Disappointments

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If we will be quiet
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and ready enough,
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we shall find compensation
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in every disappointment.
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~Henry David Thoreau~
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Start paying closer attention to how your mind makes contact with an event or an object!

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Turning Tail: Photograph by Lance Isackson, National Geographic Your Shot
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Excerpt from “The Mindfulness Code”:
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“The objective here is to start paying closer attention to how your mind makes contact with an event or an object, how it then interprets and responds with a related emotion, and finally, how that emotion produces a behavior or an action.
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For example, if you interpret your friend as snubbing or ignoring you, then you may feel hurt or angry.
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A possible behavior resulting from that interpretation might be that you no longer contact this friend.
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However, if your interpretation is that your friend is going through a hard time and was lost in his or her own thoughts, you may feel sad or concerned and decide to follow up with a call as soon as you get home.
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The point here is that different minds make different interpretations and evaluations of everyday events.
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By paying close attention to how our brain makes decisions, we can notice hidden patterns and habits and even decide to test an interpretation before absorbing a powerful emotion.”
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Resilience, a byproduct of mindfulness practice

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When life takes the wind
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out of your sails,
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it is to test you
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at the oars.
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~Robert Brault~
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