Posts Tagged ‘MINDFULNESS’

Opportunity

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Opportunity is missed by most because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.
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– Thomas Alva Edison –
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Matthieu Ricard states that happiness is not a given right, it must be earned through hard work.
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Change does not happen without perseverance, courage, and daily effort.
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It is how we journey that matters.
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Sunday question: is there a chance for Happiness with our behavior (lifestyle)?

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Matthieu Ricard states, the purpose of life is to be “Happy”.
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Three things need to happen.
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First: Doubt, worry, fear and unworthiness are reduced to minimal levels.
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Second: Desire and need are replaced by gratitude and giving.
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Third: We live in the moment, the only place happiness exists.
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We explore life, let go, empty the mind, then bask in the expanse of now.
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When we shower first thing in the morning, observe who and what your mind gravitates toward.
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If it searches for ways to avoid the day, sees gloom and doom, then happiness will be a stranger.
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If opportunity and brilliance await you in the shower, happiness is at hand.
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Happiness endures hardships and daily loss.
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Check out the truly happy around you.
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Their lives are not void of loss or tragedy.
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Happiness endures.
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That is what I have witnessed and experienced.
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How about you?
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Linda Graham: Bouncing Back; Somatic threshold

  
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“He suggests that when confronted with anything new, our responses range from the survival reactions of fight-flight-freeze, which halt any positive activation, all the way to adaptive activation and the free-flowing expression of creativity.
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Somewhere on that continuum there is a somatic threshold that we feel viscerally, where our body and brain chemistry stops us from going forward even though consciously — mentally, emotionally, and spiritually — we are ready to dive in.
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It can take the form of writer’s block; cold feet on the morning of the wedding; or the last-minute justification of “I don’t know anybody at the party, and I’m to tired anyway.
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This somatic marker is the disruption of the dopamine circuit, which is telling us, “Uh-oh, this is not what was expected.”
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That’s true: it’s not. It’s new.
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But that doesn’t necessarily mean we should stop abruptly.
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When we deliberately face our fear of doing something new or risky, or confront deep doubts about ourselves as human beings, we come to the somatic threshold that might block us from moving forward.
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As the meditation teacher Jack Kornfield says, we can read that anxiety not as a warning to retreat to the familiar and comfortable but as a signal that means “About to grow!”
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By facing the fear and intentionally crossing the threshold into action, we are deliberately choosing to evoke new experiences that recondition the anxiety in our nervous system.
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By pairing an old pattern of fear or block with a new, more positive pattern of courage and action, we contradict the old and rewire it.
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This is reconditioning at its finest.”
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Dopamine: Part two!

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“Mindfulness is the key here — awareness that always involves discernment of the wholesome from the unwholesome and the effect of our choices on our resilience.
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Dopamine operates on the basis of expectation.
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When the brain experiences what it expects to experience —
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when we turn on the kitchen faucet and water comes out —
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dopamine levels stay steady.
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If something unexpected happens —
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we turn on the faucet and no water comes out —
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the expectation is disrupted.
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The disruption switches off the dopamine and
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generates a slight unease in the body.
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A mistake has been detected.
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The brain directs us to stop moving forward until we know things are okay.”
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Linda Graham: Bouncing Back! Dopamine!!!

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“But there is also another powerful neurotransmitter whose effects we can harness to cross that threshold in the brain: dopamine.
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Dopamine is the neurotransmitter of pleasure and reward.
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With the release of dopamine in the brain stem we feel good, .
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we feel alive and energized,
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and we want more.
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Dopamine is actually partly responsible for the way we get into ruts, doing what makes us feel comfortable, getting better at what we’ve always been good at.
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The neurochemical reward we get from repeating successful patterns of behavior can hold us back from trying new strategies, from discovering new ways of being and coping.
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The release of dopamine can lead to addictive behaviors, too: wanting more of what made us feel good before, even if it’s not good for us.
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Maybe shopping makes us feel happier, so we run up charges on our credit card until our debt is out of control, or we try to relieve our stress with too much social drinking.”
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Updated: This is What we Hook up to, When we practice the Breathing Track or Mindfulness or Meditation!

The differences between the left and right hemispheres of the brain are vast.  Thoughts come from the left, computer like hemisphere, along with judgments, worry, guilt and shame.

Words and numbers are seen as pixels by the right side and no judgment, worry, guilt or shame exist.  They would be pixels anyway.

When we ride our Breathing Track, we hook up to the right side.  Our emotional regulation center also resides here. Some call it emptiness or without thought.

Jill Bolte Taylor is a neuroanatomist who suffered a stroke that gave her a much deeper understanding of her field of study.  Her left hemisphere shut down and she became the only human to ever be total right side functioning.  Here is how perfect and huge the right side holds for us.

Bill Bowen, the developer of psychophysical psychotherapy, has studied resilience and the creative process for thirty years.

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Linda Graham: Bouncing Back;
.
.
“He suggests that when confronted with anything new, our responses range from the survival reactions of fight-flight-freeze, which halt any positive activation, all the way to adaptive activation and the free-flowing expression of creativity.
.
.
Somewhere on that continuum there is a somatic threshold that we feel viscerally, where our body and brain chemistry stops us from going forward even though consciously — mentally, emotionally, and spiritually — we are ready to dive in.
.
.
It can take the form of writer’s block; cold feet on the morning of the wedding; or the last-minute justification of “I don’t know anybody at the party, and I’m to tired anyway.
.
.
This somatic marker is the disruption of the dopamine circuit, which is telling us, “Uh-oh, this is not what was expected.”
.
That’s true: it’s not. It’s new.
.
But that doesn’t necessarily mean we should stop abruptly.
.
.
When we deliberately face our fear of doing something new or risky, or confront deep doubts about ourselves as human beings, we come to the somatic threshold that might block us from moving forward.
.
.
As the meditation teacher Jack Kornfield says, we can read that anxiety not as a warning to retreat to the familiar and comfortable but as a signal that means “About to grow!”
.
.
By facing the fear and intentionally crossing the threshold into action, we are deliberately choosing to evoke new experiences that recondition the anxiety in our nervous system.
.
By pairing an old pattern of fear or block with a new, more positive pattern of courage and action, we contradict the old and rewire it.
.
This is reconditioning at its finest.”
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