Posts Tagged ‘MINDFULNESS’

Possessing an Undefeated Mind: not from failing but from never giving up!

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Woman III is a painting by abstract expressionist painter Willem de Kooning. Woman III is one of a series of six paintings by de Kooning done between 1951 and 1953 in which the central theme was a woman. It measures 68 by 48 1⁄2 inches (1.73 by 1.23 m) and was completed in 1953.
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“This, then, is what it means to possess an undefeated mind: not just to rebound quickly from adversity or to face it calmly, even confidently, without being pulled down by depression or anxiety, but also to get up day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year, decade after decade—even over the course of an entire lifetime—and attack the obstacles in front of us again and again and again until they fall, or we do.
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An undefeated mind isn’t one that never feels discouraged or despairing; it’s one that continues on in spite of it.
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Even when we can’t find a smile to save us, even when we’re tired beyond all endurance, possessing an undefeated mind means never forgetting that defeat comes not from failing but from giving up.”
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This Buddhist doctor has heart and willpower, I like it. Could this definition of not giving up, have helped Robin Williams?
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Learning by Watching…. . . Toddlers show intuitive understanding of probability.

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This is a screenshot from a video of the experiment in which a 2-year-old watched a researcher play a game in which there were two winning strategies, but one worked more consistently than the other. When given her own turn to play (as seen in screenshot), the toddler picked the better strategy. Credit Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences/University of Washington..
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Excerpt:
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“When it was their turn to play the game most of the children (22 out of the 32) picked the more successful block, demonstrating that they were able to use the difference in probability to their advantage.
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“Our findings help explain how young children learn so quickly, even in an uncertain and imperfect world,” said Meltzoff, a UW professor who holds the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Endowed Chair. “Remarkably, they learn about causality even if the people they are watching make mistakes and are right some but not all of the time.”
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This intuitive grasp of statistics and weighing likelihoods of a cause-and-effect scenario show that toddlers don’t need to have to go through trial and error to learn – they can just watch what other people do.”
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Full article: http://neurosciencenews.com/neurodevelopment-math-skills-toddlers-1261/
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Happiness is not something we wish for! My opinion.

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Le Rêve (French, “The Dream”) is a 1932 oil painting (130 × 97 cm) by Pablo Picasso, then 50 years old, portraying his 22-year-old mistress Marie-Thérèse Walter. It is said to have been painted in one afternoon, on 24 January 1932. It belongs to Picasso’s period of distorted depictions, with its oversimplified outlines and contrasted colors resembling early Fauvism.

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Happiness is not something we wish for, not something we work for, not something we go to school for years to accomplish, not anything in the future.
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Pursuing happy is comparable to herding cats.
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Happiness can be experienced only in this moment, that eliminates 99% of the things we chase.
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Hard for anyone to experience happiness right now, it takes acceptance and letting go of loss and suffering, right now.
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You can study, read, and think about it, however none of that will lead to happy.
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hardship and happiness? Unlikely partners or impossible partners?

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Having hardship, enduring it with a smile, staying present, living life as fully as possible, contains more happiness than a pampered life of the rich and famous.
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Hardship does not eliminate happiness, it offers an opportunity to enjoy a much deeper version of happy.
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My opinion. Some of the most difficult lives have been the most satisfied.
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Loss,,,,, mostly man made….

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“And avoiding the pain of loss is more important than experiencing the joy of gain.”
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Salesman are taught to develop emotional loss in their customers, which their products alleviate.
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Remember we create 99% of our loss by developing desires, creating emotional needs, grasping, yearning to be something else, better, richer, more powerful, happier.
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It never happens!
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Loss Aversion: the undefeated mind

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“Which brings us to the second reason happiness is difficult to achieve: it requires not only the presence of joy (meaning a positive emotional state), but also the absence of suffering.
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Unfortunately, we often fail to appreciate these things as separate and focus most of our efforts on finding things that bring us joy rather than on preparing ourselves to withstand hardship.
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We may think things that bring us joy—a good job, money, a loving spouse, and so on—simultaneously immunize us against suffering, but if anything they actually make us more vulnerable to suffering by providing us more attachments to lose.
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And avoiding the pain of loss is more important than experiencing the joy of gain.
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At least, that’s how many of us behave when forced to choose between the two, a phenomenon psychologists term loss aversion.
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In the world of day trading, for example, most experts agree the best way to make money is by selling losing trades quickly and letting winning ones ride.
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But in one study, 62 percent of traders on average did just the opposite, selling their winning trades quickly and letting their losing ones ride.
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Why?
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Because their desire to avoid the pain of loss, which they could only do by holding on to losing trades long enough for them to become winners and selling their winning trades before they became losers, was greater than their desire to experience the joy of gain (by riding out winning trades until they’d peaked).”
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My current read: “The Undefeated Mind”. ….just wonderful so far, happy…

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Author:
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Alex Lickerman, MD, is a physician and former director of primary care at one of the world’s most prestigious universities, the University of Chicago. He is also a practicing Nichiren Buddhist and leader in the Nichiren Buddhist lay organization, the Soka Gakkai International, USA (SGI-USA).
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Dr. Lickerman is a prolific writer, having written for medical textbooks, national trade publications, and even for Hollywood with an adaptation of Milton’s Paradise Lost. He has extensive speaking experience, having given lectures at high schools, colleges, and medical conferences, and was recently selected by the Consumers’ Research Council of America as one of America’s top physicians in their publication Guide to America’s Top Physicians. Dr. Lickerman’s blog “Happiness in this World.”
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“Alex Lickerman mines life’s greatest challenges with an artist’s eye, a scientist’s rigor and a Buddhist’s wise hand. The result is a book that I could not stop reading. Alex’s unique gifts as a writer, doctor and scientific thinker make for an epiphany-studded quest to tame his own mind and to commune with the minds of others. He has produced a book that is profound, compassionate, and triply inspiring.”

–Kaja Perina, editor-in-chief, Psychology Today

“Buddhism and Western medicine would seem an incongruous mixture, but in the hands of Alex Lickerman they meld seamlessly into a recipe for overcoming life’s hardships—indeed, for turning them into advantages. An accomplished physician, Lickerman has no truck for the supernatural, but recognizes that the tenets of Nichiren Buddhism have been honed over centuries to help alleviate life’s inevitable sufferings. The Undefeated Mind is a deeply engaging story of how Lickerman has fused modern medicine with ancient wisdom to heal his patients both physically and psychologically—lessons that apply to all of us.”

–Jerry Coyne, professor of Ecology and Evolution at University of Chicago and author of Why Evolution is True

“Eastern religious practices such as chanting are often brushed aside as ‘mysticism’ by Western science. In this highly original book based on extensive case studies, Lickerman effectively bridges these two great traditions, providing novel insights along the way on how we can all triumph over the psychological impact of adversity and live joyfully, even in this ‘vale of tears.'”

–V. S. Ramachandran, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition at University of California San Diego and author of the New York Times bestseller The Tell-Tale Brain

“Dr. Lickerman’s wisdom and compassion are evident on every page of this outstanding book. Inspired by his many years of practice in the Nichiren Buddhist tradition, Dr. Lickerman, a practicing physician, sets forth nine principles for developing an ‘undefeated mind.’ An undefeated mind is not a passive mind that is sometimes associated with Buddhism. It is a mind that never gives up the search for solutions to life’s inevitable obstacles. It is a mind that knows that peace and happiness are attainable even in the midst of hardships, such as rejection, illness, and loss. It is a mind that treats adversity as an opportunity for growth.

By sharing personal stories of how he and his patients have benefited from these nine principles, Dr. Lickerman turns them into easy-to-apply tools that everyone can put to use immediately.

Incorporating the nine principles of The Undefeated Mind into your everyday life will open the door to limitless compassion for others and to unshakeable happiness for yourself. This profound book has the power to change your life.”

—Toni Bernhard, author of How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers

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