Posts Tagged ‘C-PTSD’

preparing for the storm of PTSD,,,,,,, polish your focus….

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Mark George Tobey
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The mind craves emptiness, to be void of thought, of judgment, of worry, of expectation, of performance, of fear and self doubt.
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The challenge becomes how to accompish this in a timely, (well as quick as humanly possible) manner.
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The solution (my opinion) lies in a simple, finite, immeditate model used for practice throughout the day in short intervals.
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Our focus, our mindfulness practice, has to withstand the explosion of the fight or flight mechanism, the adrenal stress response.
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In fact, the ability to stay present without grasping that trigger thought, guts the power of PTSD, quickly.
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We need accomplish nothing to heal, we need to let go and stay in this moment and happiness will be spotted from time to time.
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“NEGATIVE TRUMPS POSITIVE”,,, Rick Hanson………

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Mark George Tobey
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“Negative events generally have more impact than positive ones.
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For example, it’s easy to acquire feelings of learned helplessness from a few failures, but hard to undo those feelings, even with many successes (Seligman 2006).
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People will do more to avoid a loss than to acquire a comparable gain (Baumeister et al. 2001).
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Compared to lottery winners, accident victims usually take longer to return to their original baseline of happiness (Brickman, Coates, and Janoff-Bulman 1978).
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Bad information about a person carries more weight than good information (Peeters and Czapinski 1990),
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and in relationships, it typically takes about five positive interactions to overcome the effects of a single negative one (Gottman 1995).”
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Excerpt From: Hanson, Rick. “Buddha’s Brain.”

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Mark George Tobey
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“The brain typically detects negative information faster than positive information.
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Take facial expressions, a primary signal of threat or opportunity for a social animal like us:
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fearful faces are perceived much more rapidly than happy or neutral ones, probably fast-tracked by the amygdala (Yang, Zald, and Blake 2007).
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In fact, even when researchers make fearful faces invisible to conscious awareness, the amygdala still lights up (Jiang and He 2006).
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The brain is drawn to bad news.”
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my two cents:
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PTSD attracts even more negative, fearful, traumatic bad news, predictions, doom around the next bend.
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suggestions for releasing the Ego’s grip! My opinion as always!

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Title: A Woman Reading near a Goldfish Tank
Painted by: Lovis (Franz Heinrich Louis) Corinth
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suggestion 1: The obvious, focus on the breath, letting go, letting the storyline of the Ego’s plight fade.
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2: Look around, find others less fortunate, then accept where you are in life in its entirety. Visit the childrens ward of your local hospital, or venture out to volunteer at a soup kitchen. Look those needy kids and people in the eye, and know how lucky you really are.
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3. Start givng in a personl way to others. It can be as little as a smile and warm greeting or five minutes of listening to anothers words.
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4. Can you stop judging? Can you let judgment fade?
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5. Aerobic exercise past tired, past thought.
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6. Drop some daily desires, let that old loss you feel go, release in into the air from which it was spun.
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7. Accept all of you, less need, less ego.
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8. Smile, life is a journey not a judgment.
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“Primary Neurotransmitters: Buddhas’s Brain,,, Rick Hanson.

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Title: Self portrait in armour, 1914
Painted by: Lovis (Franz Heinrich Louis) Corinth
Year: 1914
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Glutamate—excites receiving neurons.
GABA—inhibits receiving neurons.
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Neuromodulators
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These substances—sometimes also called neurotransmitters—influence the primary neurotransmitters. Because they’re released widely within the brain, they have a powerful effect.
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Serotonin—regulates mood, sleep, and digestion; most antidepressants aim at increasing its effects.
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Dopamine—involved with rewards and attention; promotes approach behaviors.
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Norepinephrine—alerts and arouses.
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Acetylcholine—promotes wakefulness and learning.
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Markers for Melancholy by Jennifer Gibson, PharmD | March 7, 2014

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Christ and Buddha
Paul Ranson
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“Depression involves, in part, dysfunctions in the perception of, response to, and interpretation of emotions. Research is now focusing on biomarkers that are involved in the pathophysiology of depression, which may lead to improved treatments.
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Several parts of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, striatum, and insula, work together to regulate emotions, and people with depression exhibit altered structure and function of these areas. Many direct and indirect factors lead to these alterations, including chronic exposure to stress and genetic influences.
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For the better part of a century, depression has been approached as a deficiency in specific neurotransmitters in the brain. Pharmacological treatments for depression have relied on increasing the release or blocking the destruction of these neurotransmitters, including dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Still, these therapies are only able to induce remission in approximately half of patients with depression, leaving many patients suffering and in need of help.”
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Continued in response section.
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life will gain more meaning the more we let judgment go…

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Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I is a 1907 painting by Gustav Klimt. The first of two portraits Klimt painted of Bloch-Bauer, it has been referred to as the final and most fully representative work of his golden phase.[1]

The painting was appropriated by the Nazis, and its ownership was subsequently contested between the heirs of the original owners and the Austrian state, finally being settled by a panel of Austrian judges in favor of the family members. According to press reports, the work was later sold for US$135 million to Ronald Lauder for his Neue Galerie in New York City in June 2006, which made it at that time the most expensive painting for about 4 months.[2] It has been on display at the gallery since July 2006.
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Frankl: “suffering ceasing to be suffering, he argued at the moment it acquires meaning.”
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We have to let go of judgments, worry, and self doubt to find meaning when life explodes.
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Practice, develop your ability to focus, to let the mind empty, to let thoughts fade, to heal and finally to find happiness.
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Be prepared, life does not slow down because we stumble.
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