Posts Tagged ‘C-PTSD’

The Emotional Life of Your Brain: How Its Unique Patterns Affect the Way You Think, Feel, andLive–and How You Can Change Them by Richard J. Davidson

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You know it’s a good book when you start highlighting the introduction.
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“The smallest, most fleeting unit of emotion is an emotional state.
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Typically lasting only a few seconds, it tends to be triggered by an experience—the spike of joy you feel at the macaroni collage your child made you for Mother’s Day, the sense of accomplishment you feel upon finishing a big project at work, the anger you feel over having to work all three days of a holiday weekend, the sadness you feel when your child is the only one in her class not invited to a party.
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Emotional states can also arise from purely mental activity, such as daydreaming, or introspection, or anticipating the future.
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But whether they are triggered by real-world experiences or mental ones, emotional states tend to dissipate, each giving way to the next?
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Life is a river,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

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A river
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runs rapidly,
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then —–Slows——-
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m-e-a-n-d-e-r-s
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a while,
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in places,
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like life,
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downstream
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always
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a mystery.
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Acceptance
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Slows
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the current
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of emotion
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of doubt
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and worry.
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Allowing us to
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Use our oars
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to direct,
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Our attention
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On this journey.
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External versus internal

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Matthieu Ricard: “happiness”
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We look for happiness outside ourselves when it is basically an inner state of being.
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If it were an exterior condition, it would be forever beyond our reach.
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Our desires are boundless and our control over the world is limited, temporary, and, more often than not, illusory.
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We forge bonds of friendship, start families, live in society, work to improve the material conditions of our existence—is that enough to define happiness?
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No.
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We can have “everything we need” to be happy and yet be most unhappy; conversely, we can remain serene in adversity.
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It is naive to imagine that external conditions alone can ensure happiness.
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That is the surest way to a rude awakening.
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Self image and happiness,,,,

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My opinion: Hard to find happiness with an unworthy self image.
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Damn near impossible to find true happiness with an unworthy self image.
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When you feel vulnerable, anxious, how does it impact your self image.
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Sit down and review how your self image inflates and deflates with external stimulus and then internal judgment about our self image.
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Know this pattern, know the self image can be complete, full, content, and happy everyday.
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It is plastic remember, pliable.
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Starts with awareness, then acceptance, then action in the face of unworthiness.
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Find another gear!

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Life is like a ten-speed bicycle.
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Most of us have gears we never use.
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-Charles Schulz-
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Those gears become available when we let go enough.
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Risking Your Life without a Second Thought: Intuitive Decision-Making and Extreme Altruism

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“When faced with the chance to help someone in mortal danger, what is our first response?
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Do we leap into action, only later considering the risks to ourselves?
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Or must instinctive self-preservation be overcome by will-power in order to act?
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We investigate this question by examining the testimony of Carnegie Hero Medal Recipients (CHMRs), extreme altruists who risked their lives to save others. We collected published interviews with CHMRs where they described their decisions to help.
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We then had participants rate the intuitiveness versus deliberativeness of the decision-making process described in each CHMR statement.
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The statements were judged to be overwhelmingly dominated by intuition; to be significantly more intuitive than a set of control statements describing deliberative decision-making; and to not differ significantly from a set of intuitive control statements.
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This remained true when restricting to scenarios in which the CHMRs had sufficient time to reflect before acting if they had so chosen.
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Text-analysis software found similar results. These findings suggest that high-stakes extreme altruism may be largely motivated by automatic, intuitive processes.”
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“Risking Your Life without a Second Thought: Intuitive Decision-Making and Extreme Altruism” by David G. Rand and Ziv G. Epstein in PLOS ONE, October 15 2014 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109687
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Letting go of thought daily has similar miraculous benefits for us!
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A viewers response on letting go: .. … …. ..letting go of judgement is the biggest though, especially self judgement

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With an average of 60,000 thoughts a day passing through our noggin, a maximum of 123 a second under stress, so letting go seems more important, more pertinent, than personal achievement or glory.
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Our goal is to let go enough, to get below this chatter, all this distraction, all this robbing of life and eventually happiness.
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Yes, letting go is a big theme, a direction to covet, pursue, enjoy.
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Letting go takes no extra time, actually it grants us time to be aware, to be able to pursue happiness after healing.
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