Posts Tagged ‘C-PTSD’

Where does mindfulness transport us? The right hemisphere, of course!

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Our right hemisphere (our expansive side) only has knowledge of this present moment.
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It has never known past or future, thoughts or judgments, words or consonants, paragraphs or sentences, unworthiness or doubt.
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Our left side (cognitive engine, ego) is like a literal computer, a virtual filing system of past knowledge and experience (memory).
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It is a champion of judgment, scrutiny and dissociation. It can form our self image, worthy or shameful, positive or damaged, open or closed to the world.
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It operates freely in the past or future, a place where happiness is never found.
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We are practicing mindfulness, building focus, emptying our mind of thought for brief period of time, initially.
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Mindfulness and Happiness exist only in this present moment, now.
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Contextual Therapy:Treating Survivors of Complex Trauma presented by Dr. Stephen Gold.

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“There are elements found in complex trauma not fully captured by the current PTSD diagnosis, namely the experience of captivity (for example, young children typically have no resources for escaping ongoing abuse by parents), the loss of a sense of safety, trust, self-worth and the loss of (or failure to develop) a coherent sense of self.”
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Diagnostic Criteria for Complex PTSD
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History of prolonged subjugation resulting in alterations in
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Affect Regulation (impulsive acting out)
Consciousness (dissociation)
Self-perception (shame, helplessness)
Perceptions of Perpetrator (preoccupation which may take the form of fear/sadness or identifying with and defending)
Relations with others (isolation, search for rescuer, revictimization)
Systems of Meaning (hopelessness)
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Pleasant and unpleasant

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We use mindfulness
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to observe the way
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we cling to pleasant experiences
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and push away unpleasant ones
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Sharon Salzburg
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For concentration to deepen the mind needs to relax. .

  
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Snail a Catherine: Focused and Fearless;
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“THE FIRST FORMAL INSTRUCTION I received for jhana practice surprised me.
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My teacher told me to meditate in any way that supported the development of three qualities: mental brightness, spaciousness, and relaxation.
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I had expected the early instructions to emphasize vigorous focus on a narrow object.
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It soon became clear, however, that demanding effort can create tension; in the wake of tension, aversion and hindrances thrive.
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Conversely, a mind that is relaxed, bright, and spacious contributes to mental and physical ease and encourages a natural release into present-moment experience.
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For concentration to deepen the mind needs to relax.
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It cannot stay on the defensive.”
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Excerpt From: Catherine, Shaila. “Focused and Fearless.”

  
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The characteristic stability of ekaggata transforms the hindrance of desire.
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Desirous energy tends to want more: it lurches to reach for the next good thing or clutch at present experience hoping it will last longer.
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Based in craving, desire is never satisfied, and the mind affected by desire cannot rest.
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No matter how much a person possesses, as long as greed arises the mind is discontent.
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The Buddha remarked that even if the Himalayas were turned into gold, it would not satisfy one man’s greed.
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After one pleasure is attained, the next is sought, perpetuating the fantasy of future fulfillment.
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In contrast, the focused intensity of one-pointedness needs nothing more.
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With ekaggata there is no sense of deficiency, nothing lacking.
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The mind is completely unified and “one with the experience.”
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Attachment: Sheila Catherine

  
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“Find an experience that is pleasant: looking at a sunrise, feeling the smooth fur of a cat, holding a warm cup of tea, or any other such simple thing.
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Practice moving the attention between the object and the pleasant feeling it elicits.
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Shift your attention between the object of pleasure (the visual image, feeling of warmth or softness) and the pleasurable feeling it evokes.
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Practice allowing the attention to settle within the experience of pleasantness without adding attachment.
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If the desire for more arises, notice that attachment.
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Ask yourself—what is this feeling of attachment?
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Does attachment increase the pleasure, or decrease it?
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Many people will recognize attachment by a characteristic feeling of contraction or separation.
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How do you notice attachment to pleasure as distinct from a simple experience of pleasure?
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Updated: A response in Affirmations: How and Why!!!!!

amedo modigliani

This is a response from Browneyegirl: The awareness to know, then face your vulnerabilities with this process is the best I have ever read.
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“I create my own affirmations by looking inside of myself and thinking about what my fears, worries, and concerns are. Once I know what they are I create an affirmation to fill in that space, and eventually I am whole again in that area. For example, about my fears regarding my abuser, I feel trapped, threatened, and hurt. I explored those feelings further as they came up anytime HE came up in my head, and eventually, I created this affirmation, “ I forgive you for what you have done to me and I am safe.”
When I say this to myself, I usually end up imagining I am on an island, with a willow tree and a small cottage. For me that image provides a sort of sanctuary for my spirit and soul.”
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