Archive for the ‘Assorted’ Category

Frankl finds meaning, can we?

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Pierre-August Renoir (1841-1919)
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Viktor Emil Frankl, M.D. , Ph.D. (26 March 1905 – 2 September 1997) was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor.
Born: March 26, 1905, Leopoldstadt, Vienna
Died: September 2, 1997, Vienna
Nationality: Austrian
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As Frankl
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so poignantly demonstrated,
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the ability to create value
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out of even the most
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horrific circumstances
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is often what
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carries us
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through them,
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suffering ceasing to be suffering,
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he argued,
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at the moment
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it acquires meaning.
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enduring part two….

Diego Velazquez

Diego Velazquez


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“In one study, psychologist Philip Zombardo administered a series of electric shocks to a group of college students to determine their pain tolerance.
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Then he offered a choice to some of them about whether to receive additional shocks while telling them that their continuing participation in the research would greatly advance scientific understanding (the experimental group).
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To the rest he gave neither a choice about receiving additional shocks nor a chance to gain a sense of purpose about receiving them (the control group).
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When he compared the responses of the two groups to subsequent shocks, not only did the experimental group report lower levels of pain, but also measurements of their galvanic skin resistance showed reduced physiologic responses to pain as well.
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Defining and embracing a mission can also greatly increase our sense of self-worth, supplanting the image we have of ourselves as only one among faceless billions with one of ourselves as the important—perhaps even heroic—figures we all have the potential to be.”
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enduring with a purpose,,, the undefeated mind,, part one..

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No. 5, 1948 is a painting by Jackson Pollock, an American painter known for his contributions to the abstract expressionist movement. The painting was done on an 8′ × 4′ sheet of fiberboard, with thick amounts of brown and yellow paint drizzled on top of it, forming a nest-like appearance.[1] It was originally owned by Samuel Irving Newhouse, Jr. and displayed at the Museum of Modern Art before being sold to David Geffen and then allegedly to David Martinez in 2006 (though the supposed sale of this painting to Martinez has been denied by his attorneys).
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“Engaging in work we consider important rather than merely enjoyable also seems to increase our ability to tolerate stress.
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For example, though caring for patients with terminal illnesses is widely considered among the most nerve-racking jobs in all of health care, providers who do it report among the lowest levels of burnout.
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Why?
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In a study of palliative-care nurses, the most commonly reported reason was the heightened sense of purpose they felt in providing comfort to the terminally ill.
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Perhaps even more remarkable is the increased ability to endure physical pain that a strong sense of purpose also seems to grant.”
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helping others enhances our self esteem?.. interesting

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The current record price was paid for The Card Players by Paul Cézanne, which was sold for more than $250 million.
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the Undefeated Mind:
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“When psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky had students perform five acts of kindness of their choosing per week over the course of six weeks, they reported a significant increase in their levels of happiness relative to a control group of students who didn’t.
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But why would creating value for others boost our happiness set-point
beyond the point at which our heredity has set it when things like career advancement, money, and marriage don’t?
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One possibility, I suggested to Steve, is that the more value we create for others, the more value we assign ourselves.
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Helping others, in other words, enhances our self-esteem.
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Giving linked to happiness, creating it sometimes:: the undefeated Mind!

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Portrait of Dr. Gachet is one of the most revered paintings by the Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh. It depicts Dr. Paul Gachet who took care of Van Gogh during the final months of his life. There are two authenticated versions of the portrait, both painted in June 1890 at Auvers-sur-Oise. Both show Gachet sitting at a table and leaning his head on his right arm but they are easily differentiated in color and style. In 1990, the first version fetched a record price of $82.5 million ($75 million, plus a 10 percent buyer’s commission) when sold at auction in New York.[1] When accounting for inflation, this is still the highest price paid for art at a public auction.
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“According to one study that analyzed data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Survey, a collection of statistics representing the largest and longest-standing series of observations on happiness in the world, the trait most strongly associated with long-term increases in life satisfaction is, in fact, a persistent commitment to pursuing altruistic goals.
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What’s more, according to another study, altruism doesn’t just correlate with an increase in happiness; it actually causes it—at least in the short term.”
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Possessing an Undefeated Mind: not from failing but from never giving up!

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Woman III is a painting by abstract expressionist painter Willem de Kooning. Woman III is one of a series of six paintings by de Kooning done between 1951 and 1953 in which the central theme was a woman. It measures 68 by 48 1⁄2 inches (1.73 by 1.23 m) and was completed in 1953.
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“This, then, is what it means to possess an undefeated mind: not just to rebound quickly from adversity or to face it calmly, even confidently, without being pulled down by depression or anxiety, but also to get up day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year, decade after decade—even over the course of an entire lifetime—and attack the obstacles in front of us again and again and again until they fall, or we do.
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An undefeated mind isn’t one that never feels discouraged or despairing; it’s one that continues on in spite of it.
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Even when we can’t find a smile to save us, even when we’re tired beyond all endurance, possessing an undefeated mind means never forgetting that defeat comes not from failing but from giving up.”
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This Buddhist doctor has heart and willpower, I like it. Could this definition of not giving up, have helped Robin Williams?
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Learning by Watching…. . . Toddlers show intuitive understanding of probability.

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This is a screenshot from a video of the experiment in which a 2-year-old watched a researcher play a game in which there were two winning strategies, but one worked more consistently than the other. When given her own turn to play (as seen in screenshot), the toddler picked the better strategy. Credit Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences/University of Washington..
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Excerpt:
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“When it was their turn to play the game most of the children (22 out of the 32) picked the more successful block, demonstrating that they were able to use the difference in probability to their advantage.
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“Our findings help explain how young children learn so quickly, even in an uncertain and imperfect world,” said Meltzoff, a UW professor who holds the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Endowed Chair. “Remarkably, they learn about causality even if the people they are watching make mistakes and are right some but not all of the time.”
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This intuitive grasp of statistics and weighing likelihoods of a cause-and-effect scenario show that toddlers don’t need to have to go through trial and error to learn – they can just watch what other people do.”
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Full article: http://neurosciencenews.com/neurodevelopment-math-skills-toddlers-1261/
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