Archive for the ‘Assorted’ Category

Eckhart Tolle, ,,, ,, a pair of wild cards, well quotes metaphorically speaking, jokers are wild, no?

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“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”
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“Rather than being
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your thoughts
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and emotions,
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be the awareness
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behind them.”
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Letting go practice, it sounds like to me.
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The ASU study’s findings about stress hormones, such as cortisol (3-D rendering seen above), are important as they pertain to women, since women are twice as likely to develop disorders from stress and trauma that affect memory, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

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Excerpt: Peggy Coulombe – Arizona State University..
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“When a person experiences a devastating loss or tragic event, why does every detail seem burned into memory whereas a host of positive experiences simply fade away?
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It’s a bit more complicated than scientists originally thought, according to a study recently published in the journal Neuroscience by ASU researcher Sabrina Segal.
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When people experience a traumatic event, the body releases two major stress hormones: norepinephrine and cortisol. Norepinephrine boosts heart rate and controls the fight-or-flight response, commonly rising when individuals feel threatened or experience highly emotional reactions. It is chemically similar to the hormone epinephrine – better known as adrenaline.
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In the brain, norepinephrine in turn functions as a powerful neurotransmitter or chemical messenger that can enhance memory.
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Research on cortisol has demonstrated that this hormone can also have a powerful effect on strengthening memories. However, studies in humans up until now have been inconclusive – with cortisol sometimes enhancing memory, while at other times having no effect.
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A key factor in whether cortisol has an effect on strengthening certain memories may rely on activation of norepinephrine during learning, a finding previously reported in studies with rats.
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Conducted in the laboratory of Larry Cahill at U.C. Irvine, Segal’s study included 39 women who viewed 144 images from the International Affective Picture Set. This set is a standardized picture set used by researchers to elicit a range of responses, from neutral to strong emotional reactions, upon view.
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What Segal’s team found was that “negative experiences are more readily remembered when an event is traumatic enough to release cortisol after the event, and only if norepinephrine is released during or shortly after the event.”
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“This study provides a key component to better understanding how traumatic memories may be strengthened in women,” Segal added, “because it suggests that if we can lower norepinephrine levels immediately following a traumatic event, we may be able to prevent this memory enhancing mechanism from occurring, regardless of how much cortisol is released following a traumatic event.”
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Further studies are needed to explore to what extent the relationship between these two stress hormones differ depending on whether you are male or female, particularly because women are twice as likely to develop disorders from stress and trauma that affect memory, such as in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).“
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Mindfulness our “Pixie Dust” . … . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .“Jake and the Neverland Pirates” .

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One area I have gained considerable expertise recently is children’s programs, “Frozen”, “Jesse” for the six year old, Thomas and friends and “Jake and the Neverland Pirates”.
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One of the characters “Izzy” has pixie dust (mindfulness) for emergencies.
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She sprinkles a little around and off they go, safe, secure, to live happily ever after.
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Mindfulness is our pixie dust, our way of making it through a sudden death of a close friend, an accident that paralyzes a colleague, a diagnosis of cancer for a family member, or any of the other unfair, unexplainable events of life.
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The ability to sprinkle a little mindfulness, a little letting go, a small release of that tight, tense, anxious, grasping of sorrow Saves us at times.
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Practice on easy days preparing for the cloudy, stormy days.
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John Wooden, “Failing to prepare, is preparing to fail”.
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How can you top that, excuses melt in its blaze of pragmatism.
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We never arrive,,, if it is a journey, Not a destination, a geographical place, a position, a place of power, an accomplishment…

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We never arrive, never have it all figured out, never know what is around the bend, never quite reaching that level of success, status, or peace of mind to be truly happy.
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How do we live then?
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Mindfulness allows us to let all those quandaries fade, attention is their food, sustenance for their survival.
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Maybe life is not supposed to be figured out, cognitively dissected, maybe it is to be lived full out, in this moment, entirely.
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Maybe.
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the futility of following the “Ego”, Trying to satisfy that which does not exist.

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“Shortly after every standing ovation,
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the sense of inadequacy returns
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and follows us as inexorably
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as a shadow.”
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How can we fill, the unfillable, the non existent, an invention, a made up person?
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Phillip Seymour Hoffman had many standing ovations, millions of dollars of reward, iconic worship, fan adulation but his coiffures emptied as fast as they filled.
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Can we visualize the “Ego” as a container, empty continuously, constantly, pulling to get more liquid, to be filled,,, to be full,,to be…

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At times, we chase pleasure, fulfill desires, covet satisfaction above all else.
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In spite of all this effort, energy, emotional upset, the chalice of the “ego” never fills, or is ever full enough because it is a delusion, a shadow, a ghost of thought.
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Next time you leave this moment, to dissociate, to wander aimlessly, visualize this container.
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Be aware of the futility of your quest.
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Wide open part three, Adequacy versus inadequacy,,,,,…..

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.The chalice of the ego looks like this.
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If you feel inadequate, for example, you may seek a sense of adequacy from people or things, from what you’ve done, or from your appearance, your talents, or your performances.
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This never works out.
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A sense of adequacy doesn’t come from any of these things; it comes from who you are.
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This is why so many of us feel deficient and unworthy no matter what we do.
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We perform.
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We get wonderful things.
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We may even succeed in proving our adequacy to others, but we never quite prove it to ourselves.
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Shortly after every standing ovation, the sense of inadequacy returns and follows us as inexorably as a shadow.
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(the ego is never equal to anyone, always superior or inferior, so,applause or momentary success does not fill the sieve container of the “Ego”)
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The sense of inadequacy also follows us into our love relationships, where we tend to play out our role in some of the most dramatic ways.
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Surely the one who loves us will give us what we always longed for.
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Surely this person’s love will be enough, and through it, we will finally be enough.
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This never quite works out either, even when our partners do their best to assure us that we’re okay, or even far more than okay.
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In fact, the distortions of our self-authorship often manifest more dramatically in these relationships than anywhere else, due to the extraordinary perceptual distortion known as projection—attributing your own thoughts and judgments to others.
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Part two: .. Living with the heart Wide open again. “——-Self authorship”—- * * *

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Self-authorship begins very early in life in our responses to our caregivers.
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If we are raised in a safe and secure environment in which we feel accepted and validated, we tend to have more self-compassion and less self-criticism (Neff and McGehee 2008).
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But if our caregivers are more critical or aggressive or we feel unsafe with them for any reason, we tend to become more self-critical and insecure as we grow older (Gilbert and Proctor 2006).
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We see ourselves in the mirrors of others’ eyes and behaviors, and our stories reflect what we see there.
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Who you believe you are began in your early relationships with your caregivers, and it was in these exchanges that you decided if you were worthy or unworthy, adequate or inadequate.
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Your story has developed within this original theme from then on.
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If you feel inadequate, for example, you may seek a sense of adequacy from people or things, from what you’ve done, or from your appearance, your talents, or your performances.
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This never works out.
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Part one:… Living with the heart Wide open,,,,, ,stories,,,arbitrary,,,self criticism….

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“The stories you repeat make up your personal history and identity.
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They include the place and time you were born, the way it was in your family, the things that happened to you, the things you did, the things others did, your first love, and your first betrayal.
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It goes on and on—as long as you repeat it.
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When you really look at your self-stories, you may discover that they’re repetitive and even arbitrary, depending on your mood.
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It’s likely that the details don’t even match up with those in the stories of your parents or closest siblings.
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A good question is “Who would you be without your story?”
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Seeing yourself without your story is an excellent way to let go of taking things personally (which can be very helpful with shame and inadequacy).
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Pragmatic mindfulness: Awareness edition…… Former WWE champ Daniel Bryan catches suspected burglar… … .house selection?

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If our profession is burglary, house selection is key, awareness that is. An attempt at sarcasm, humor.
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PHOENIX – A former WWE champion known as Daniel Bryan chased two burglary suspects he saw exiting his Phoenix home this week and subdued one until officers arrived, investigators said.
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According to police, Bryan Danielson and his wife, Brianna, drove into the carport of their Arcadia home and saw a door to the house start to open.
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That’s when Danielson and his wife, a fellow former WWE star known as Brie Bella, ran inside to check on their dog, Josie.
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“They’re actually lucky that I got them instead of Brie (wife), because she probably would have been a little more violent.”
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Danielson and Cesar Sosa, 22, got into a struggle, but the former champ subdued him until officers arrived, Phoenix police Sgt. Tommy Thompson said. The second suspect got away.
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The former champ said he didn’t have to apply the “Yes! lock” — his signature move– to get Sosa to surrender, but he did put him in a rear naked choke hold.
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“Unfortunately, he wasn’t in very good shape,” Danielson said. “So, it didn’t take much.”
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