Where would we be without our risk takers…. still. I would let my partner go first with this trial…

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27. W.H. Murphy testing the bulletproof vest in 1923. Colorized recently.
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I would trade off for discovering popcorn, how did someone discover popcorn, any how.?
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Look at the effort, ingenuity, discipline and risk taken by business men for profit; now compare that with the effort to sit quietly and discover ourselves, be happy, be at peace.
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We are to busy to stop, to find what happy is all about.
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We board a train destined for suffering instead, misguided in youth, reinforced through middle age and rigidly adhered to as a senior citizen.
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Where is the passion to live in this moment, to train the mind to be empty, focused, calm.
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Unintended consequence of cultivating compassion,,, giving unleashes an inner power, an inner guide,,, a savant of sorts…

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Just as a virtual classroom on the internet is limitless, opportunity for each one us is limitless, growth limitless, happiness limitless.
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Our capacity to cultivate compassion is limitless, as its power, I am finding out.
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My compassion, my openness, my ability to experience more of life has freed me some, knocked down the barrier walls of doubt and unworthiness.
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Organically a shift is underfoot, changes for myself arrive out of nowhere.
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The importance of upgrading my blog surfaced, brilliantly shining after I stopped and helped that family of five kids.
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Why or where it comes from, I do not know, but it arrives complete and perfect so far.
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Compassion has brought awareness to many more changes, like stepping to the side of a situation, looking at my issues from a different perspective, different view, egoless to some extent.
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I am adopting a position of the glass not being half full or half empty, to the glass just being there.
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Cultivate your compassion with some giving, in some personal way to another.
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Nothing happens without effort, action.
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Letting go Monday, morning all???.

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Today, we are practicing, implementing, “letting go”, “letting go”, “letting go”, over and over.
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First thing in the shower, our first encounter with the cognitive draw to worry, let it go greets us.
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The kids are screaming, a stressful project is due, the bills are late, let go that judgment about you, about life, about the future, about your worthiness.
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A car just cut you off, take a breath, let it go, smile, let it go, it is a victory, you are on your way, keep it up.
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Even if we get drawn in, we vacate the judgment and let go as soon as possible, no judgment, just an intention to be present, here and now.
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This is how life totally changes, letting go like this, practicing, stumbling, going slow, then accelerating, then trash compacting judgment and worry.
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Eckhart Tolle, ,,, ,, a pair of wild cards, well quotes metaphorically speaking, jokers are wild, no?

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“Worry pretends to be necessary but serves no useful purpose”
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“Rather than being
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your thoughts
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and emotions,
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be the awareness
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behind them.”
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Letting go practice, it sounds like to me.
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The ASU study’s findings about stress hormones, such as cortisol (3-D rendering seen above), are important as they pertain to women, since women are twice as likely to develop disorders from stress and trauma that affect memory, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

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Excerpt: Peggy Coulombe – Arizona State University..
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“When a person experiences a devastating loss or tragic event, why does every detail seem burned into memory whereas a host of positive experiences simply fade away?
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It’s a bit more complicated than scientists originally thought, according to a study recently published in the journal Neuroscience by ASU researcher Sabrina Segal.
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When people experience a traumatic event, the body releases two major stress hormones: norepinephrine and cortisol. Norepinephrine boosts heart rate and controls the fight-or-flight response, commonly rising when individuals feel threatened or experience highly emotional reactions. It is chemically similar to the hormone epinephrine – better known as adrenaline.
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In the brain, norepinephrine in turn functions as a powerful neurotransmitter or chemical messenger that can enhance memory.
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Research on cortisol has demonstrated that this hormone can also have a powerful effect on strengthening memories. However, studies in humans up until now have been inconclusive – with cortisol sometimes enhancing memory, while at other times having no effect.
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A key factor in whether cortisol has an effect on strengthening certain memories may rely on activation of norepinephrine during learning, a finding previously reported in studies with rats.
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Conducted in the laboratory of Larry Cahill at U.C. Irvine, Segal’s study included 39 women who viewed 144 images from the International Affective Picture Set. This set is a standardized picture set used by researchers to elicit a range of responses, from neutral to strong emotional reactions, upon view.
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What Segal’s team found was that “negative experiences are more readily remembered when an event is traumatic enough to release cortisol after the event, and only if norepinephrine is released during or shortly after the event.”
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“This study provides a key component to better understanding how traumatic memories may be strengthened in women,” Segal added, “because it suggests that if we can lower norepinephrine levels immediately following a traumatic event, we may be able to prevent this memory enhancing mechanism from occurring, regardless of how much cortisol is released following a traumatic event.”
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Further studies are needed to explore to what extent the relationship between these two stress hormones differ depending on whether you are male or female, particularly because women are twice as likely to develop disorders from stress and trauma that affect memory, such as in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).“
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Mindfulness our “Pixie Dust” . … . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .“Jake and the Neverland Pirates” .

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One area I have gained considerable expertise recently is children’s programs, “Frozen”, “Jesse” for the six year old, Thomas and friends and “Jake and the Neverland Pirates”.
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One of the characters “Izzy” has pixie dust (mindfulness) for emergencies.
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She sprinkles a little around and off they go, safe, secure, to live happily ever after.
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Mindfulness is our pixie dust, our way of making it through a sudden death of a close friend, an accident that paralyzes a colleague, a diagnosis of cancer for a family member, or any of the other unfair, unexplainable events of life.
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The ability to sprinkle a little mindfulness, a little letting go, a small release of that tight, tense, anxious, grasping of sorrow Saves us at times.
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Practice on easy days preparing for the cloudy, stormy days.
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John Wooden, “Failing to prepare, is preparing to fail”.
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How can you top that, excuses melt in its blaze of pragmatism.
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We never arrive,,, if it is a journey, Not a destination, a geographical place, a position, a place of power, an accomplishment…

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We never arrive, never have it all figured out, never know what is around the bend, never quite reaching that level of success, status, or peace of mind to be truly happy.
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How do we live then?
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Mindfulness allows us to let all those quandaries fade, attention is their food, sustenance for their survival.
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Maybe life is not supposed to be figured out, cognitively dissected, maybe it is to be lived full out, in this moment, entirely.
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Maybe.
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