Personalities: ……… Complex PTSD personality is , irrational, illogical!!!!!

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No, triggers are not logical, they do not make any sense, they are highly irrational, illogical, obtuse and mostly harsh towards us, me and you.
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Trauma makes no sense, in fact, it’s highly outrageous in the fears it honors.
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Confusion is the consequence we are left with.
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Let it go, maybe, you will never understand why.
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Giving thought to this quandary makes us suffer more.
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One more time, we heal by letting go, staying present and most of all by not thinking, giving energy, to negative thought, ruminating.
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MIT Wristband Could Make AC Obsolete

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Wristify, as they call their device, is a thermoelectric bracelet that regulates the temperature of the person wearing it by subjecting their skin to alternating pulses of hot or cold, depending on what’s needed.
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The prototype recently won first place at this year’s MADMEC, an annual competition put on by the school’s Materials Science and Engineering program, netting the group a $10,000 prize, which they’ll use to continue its development.
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It’s a promising start to a clever approach that could help alleviate a serious energy crisis.
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But as Sam Shames, the MIT senior who helped invent the technology, explains, the team was motivated by a more prosaic problem: keeping everyone happy in a room where no one can agree where to set the thermostat.
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Shames runs hot. His mom runs cold.
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He figured there must be a way for them to coexist peacefully. So he started researching, digging into physiology journals to get a better understanding of how we experience temperature. One paper held the key to the Wristify concept.
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It detailed how locally heating and cooling different parts of the body has all sorts of effects on how hot or cold we are–or, more accurately, how hot or cold we think we are.
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“There’s a big perceptual component to it,” Shames says.
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External versus internal

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Matthieu Ricard: “happiness”
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We look for happiness outside ourselves when it is basically an inner state of being.
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If it were an exterior condition, it would be forever beyond our reach.
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Our desires are boundless and our control over the world is limited, temporary, and, more often than not, illusory.
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We forge bonds of friendship, start families, live in society, work to improve the material conditions of our existence—is that enough to define happiness?
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No.
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We can have “everything we need” to be happy and yet be most unhappy; conversely, we can remain serene in adversity.
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It is naive to imagine that external conditions alone can ensure happiness.
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That is the surest way to a rude awakening.
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Self image and happiness,,,,

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My opinion: Hard to find happiness with an unworthy self image.
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Damn near impossible to find true happiness with an unworthy self image.
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When you feel vulnerable, anxious, how does it impact your self image.
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Sit down and review how your self image inflates and deflates with external stimulus and then internal judgment about our self image.
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Know this pattern, know the self image can be complete, full, content, and happy everyday.
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It is plastic remember, pliable.
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Starts with awareness, then acceptance, then action in the face of unworthiness.
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Three quotes for Sunday,,,,, Plan to be aware and take action …..

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What good is sitting alone in your room?
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Come hear the music play.
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Life is a Cabaret, old chum.
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Come to the Cabaret.”
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Fred Ebb and John Kander
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“There are many things in life
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that will catch your eye,
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but only a few
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will catch your heart . . .
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pursue those.”
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Author Unknown
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“I find it fascinating
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that most people
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plan their vacations
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with better care
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than they do their lives.“
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Jim Rohn
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Find another gear!

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Life is like a ten-speed bicycle.
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Most of us have gears we never use.
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-Charles Schulz-
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Those gears become available when we let go enough.
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Risking Your Life without a Second Thought: Intuitive Decision-Making and Extreme Altruism

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“When faced with the chance to help someone in mortal danger, what is our first response?
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Do we leap into action, only later considering the risks to ourselves?
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Or must instinctive self-preservation be overcome by will-power in order to act?
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We investigate this question by examining the testimony of Carnegie Hero Medal Recipients (CHMRs), extreme altruists who risked their lives to save others. We collected published interviews with CHMRs where they described their decisions to help.
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We then had participants rate the intuitiveness versus deliberativeness of the decision-making process described in each CHMR statement.
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The statements were judged to be overwhelmingly dominated by intuition; to be significantly more intuitive than a set of control statements describing deliberative decision-making; and to not differ significantly from a set of intuitive control statements.
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This remained true when restricting to scenarios in which the CHMRs had sufficient time to reflect before acting if they had so chosen.
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Text-analysis software found similar results. These findings suggest that high-stakes extreme altruism may be largely motivated by automatic, intuitive processes.”
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“Risking Your Life without a Second Thought: Intuitive Decision-Making and Extreme Altruism” by David G. Rand and Ziv G. Epstein in PLOS ONE, October 15 2014 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109687
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Letting go of thought daily has similar miraculous benefits for us!
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